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Jonathan Fanton

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The New School for Social Research in New York City filed suit against the National Endowment for the Arts Wednesday--arguing that a requirement that NEA grant recipients pledge not to produce obscene work is an illegal restraint of artistic free expression. In filing the action in U.S.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The New School for Social Research in New York City filed suit against the National Endowment for the Arts Wednesday--arguing that a requirement that NEA grant recipients pledge not to produce obscene work is an illegal restraint of artistic free expression. In filing the action in U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1989 | Compiled by Alma Cook, Times Researcher
The Otis Art Institute of Parsons School of Design held its 33rd annual commencement Wednesday at the Bandshell in MacArthur Park. Degrees were conferred on 157 students. Jonathan F. Fanton, president of the New School for Social Research, parent university to Otis/Parsons, presided over the ceremonies. In his keynote speech, he said: "As artists and designers, you already have the ability to transcend continents and cultures. But . . . you yourselves must grow beyond your own language and the limited perspective of your own culture."
OPINION
April 1, 2005
Re "U.S. Obstructs Global Justice," Commentary, March 29: Jonathan F. Fanton states that "U.S. citizens have nothing to fear from the International Criminal Court. Dictators, corrupt armies and armed groups in failing states do." Maybe I am missing something here. Why should a dictator be afraid of a court that does not have him in its possession? Do you expect Dictator Y to leave his country when summoned? Although this court has the potential to do many things, causing a reigning dictator to lose sleep is surely not one of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
National Public Radio is being awarded the largest grant in its history, $14 million, as part of $42 million in gifts announced today by the philanthropic John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. In its announcement, the foundation lauded NPR as "a reliable source of objective information and thoughtful analysis." The NPR Endowment will get $4 million immediately, and the network's operating budget will receive the remaining $10 million over 10 years.
NEWS
November 5, 1987 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Dawn Teitelbaum didn't have to wait long to hit the big time in her corner of the world. A year and a half after graduating from the Otis Art Institute of Parsons School of Design, the 22-year-old has her poster for "No Man's Land," a critically acclaimed new release starring Charlie Sheen, playing across the country right along with the movie. For Teitelbaum, a 1986 graduate of the school, this is a "major" break, an exciting beginning to a career in graphic design and illustration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1993
The article by Jonathan F. Fanton and Kurt Soderlund (Commentary, Sept. 10) on the conflict between the Armenians of Nagorno-Karabakh and the Republic of Azerbaijan on balance does an excellent job of describing the debilitating effects of the five-yearlong war. Unfortunately, the article is flawed in several areas and requires correction and clarification. The headline, "Learn From Bosnia, Help Azerbaijan," suggests an unwise course of action. In fact, the authors did not espouse helping Azerbaijan as a way to resolve the conflict.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Erik Winfree and Hideo Mabuchi couldn't have less in common. Winfree is a computer scientist designing DNA molecules that can work as living calculators. Mabuchi is a quantum physicist pursuing single atoms through a maze of mirrors and laser beams.
NEWS
September 27, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's determination to build a wide coalition to support the war on terrorists is running into opposition from groups fearful that the United States will promise too much to strategically located but repressive governments, including some traditional state sponsors of terrorism.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI and DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A confluence of seemingly separate events--the Florida obscenity imbroglio over the rap group2 Live Crew and the Washington meltdown of the National Endowment for the Arts--has intensified concern in the arts community over far broader threats to freedom of expression. It is--and always has been--a mistake, so this thinking concludes, to perceive the 2 Live Crew and NEA crises as unrelated entities.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The New School for Social Research in New York has notified the National Endowment for the Arts that it may reject a $45,000 grant, while a Seattle arts group says it will turn down endowment funding--fresh evidence of growing concern in the arts community over content-control restrictions imposed by Congress on the NEA.
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