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Jonathan Fielding

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
Los Angeles County has six probable and another eight suspected cases of SARS, although none of the patients has been positively diagnosed with the respiratory illness, according to Dr. Jonathan Fielding, director of the county's Department of Public Health. The county must improve awareness and education about the illness, Fielding said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
County officials said Tuesday they are seeking misdemeanor charges against the managers of a downtown wholesale produce market that was the focus of a KNBC-TV investigation aired last week. Dr. Jonathan Fielding, director of public health, said he asked the city attorney to file charges against Alameda Produce Inc. for alleged violations of state health and safety rules at its 7th Street Produce Market. The firm is owned by developer Richard Meruelo.
HEALTH
September 9, 2002 | JONATHAN FIELDING and VALERIE ULENE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you're afraid of toads because you've heard that touching them causes skin warts, you can relax around the little creatures. Warts are simply an overgrowth of skin cells caused by infection with the human papilloma virus. Toads have nothing to do with their spread--humans do. The virus is spread either through direct skin-to-skin contact, or indirectly, through contact with a surface that has been contaminated with the virus that has been shed from a wart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A bat found recently by students from Calabasas High School tested positive for rabies, the county Department of Public Health said Monday. Students from Agoura High School also cared for sick bats, health officials said. No students were bitten, but all received anti-rabies vaccinations as a precaution. A dozen rabid bats have been documented in the county this year, the officials said. Department director Dr. Jonathan Fielding sent parents a letter warning of the dangers of handling bats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A 60-year-old Los Angeles County woman became the 11th Californian to die from the West Nile virus, officials said Friday. The woman, who lived in the eastern portion of the county, died in late July, but authorities did not confirm the cause of death until additional tests were completed in August, according to Jonathan Fielding, director of public health for Los Angeles County's Department of Health Services. The woman's name and place of residence were not disclosed.
HEALTH
August 15, 2011 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At a time when foodborne outbreaks are in the headlines, a restaurant's health score may seem even more important than its reviews. A big C on the front door won't exactly whet the appetite, but an A gives you a sense of security. Cleanliness matters. A single rag dripping with E. coli bacteria could ruin a beef Wellington, and it only takes one unwashed hand to turn pasta primavera into a norovirus surprise. Restaurant inspections have definitely helped prevent outbreaks across the country, says food safety expert Margaret Binkley, an assistant professor in the department of consumer sciences at Ohio State University in Columbus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Board of Supervisors agreed Tuesday to settle a lawsuit brought by nine gay bathhouses last year that said county requirements imposed on the businesses violated the law. County rules mandated that such businesses obtain county health licenses, pay annual fees of more than $1,000, allow quarterly inspections and provide on-site HIV testing. Business operators "basically agreed to adhere to" county requirements but can complain of potential violations of the law or their rights, said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2009 | Ruben Vives
Public health officials Wednesday reopened Inner and Outer Cabrillo Beach after determining that 3 million gallons of treated wastewater discharged into Los Angeles Harbor from a nearby treatment plant did not contain harmful chemicals or bacteria. Public health officials closed the beach Tuesday after the Los Angeles City Terminal Treatment Plant accidentally discharged wastewater, which already had been treated for harmful waste products, into the harbor. Officials were concerned that some of the water may have flowed to the public beach.
OPINION
November 5, 2005
Re "Addicts Learn to Save Others From Death," Oct. 31 Los Angeles County Public Health Director Dr. Jonathan Fielding's recommendation for a naloxone distribution program should be commended. Putting naloxone into the hands of addicts and training them how to use it is long overdue. Harm-reduction programs such as needle exchanges save lives every day by reducing rates of HIV, hepatitis and penicillin-resistant staph infections. By adding naloxone and training addicts to save lives, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services can reduce the rising rate of deaths from drug overdoses.
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