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Jonathan Harr

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November 20, 2005 | Jay Parini, Jay Parini, a poet and novelist, is the author, most recently, of "The Art of Subtraction: New and Selected Poems."
IT makes sense that Caravaggio, a master of the Italian Baroque style, has emerged in recent decades as one of the most popular of all Italian painters. He was a sensationalist, in a way: His canvases moved far beyond the idealizations of previous painters in their depictions of religious scenes. They are nakedly realistic, often shocking, and they caused an outcry at the time.
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November 20, 2005 | Jay Parini, Jay Parini, a poet and novelist, is the author, most recently, of "The Art of Subtraction: New and Selected Poems."
IT makes sense that Caravaggio, a master of the Italian Baroque style, has emerged in recent decades as one of the most popular of all Italian painters. He was a sensationalist, in a way: His canvases moved far beyond the idealizations of previous painters in their depictions of religious scenes. They are nakedly realistic, often shocking, and they caused an outcry at the time.
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BOOKS
September 24, 1995 | Mark Dowie, Mark Dowie "Losing Ground: American Environmentalism at the Close of the 20th Century" is published by MIT Press
Among journalists, lawyers and epidemiologists there exists a subspecies known as "cluster busters," practitioners of each trade who appear inexorably at the first sign of a cluster, the slightest rise above normal incidence of a disease or birth defect. The challenge of cluster busting sounds deceptively simple: First prove that there is a cluster (or epidemic), then determine what caused it. The epidemiologist's task is to prove the first; the lawyer, the second, and the journalist, both.
BOOKS
September 24, 1995 | Mark Dowie, Mark Dowie "Losing Ground: American Environmentalism at the Close of the 20th Century" is published by MIT Press
Among journalists, lawyers and epidemiologists there exists a subspecies known as "cluster busters," practitioners of each trade who appear inexorably at the first sign of a cluster, the slightest rise above normal incidence of a disease or birth defect. The challenge of cluster busting sounds deceptively simple: First prove that there is a cluster (or epidemic), then determine what caused it. The epidemiologist's task is to prove the first; the lawyer, the second, and the journalist, both.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2006
RE "The Showoff and the Showman," March 26: For your readers interested in the search behind the discovery of "The Betrayal of Christ," Jonathan Harr's "The Lost Painting: The Quest for a Caravaggio Masterpiece" reads like a detective novel. The reader is led from a dusty basement archive in Italy to a modest seminary in Dublin, where the painting is located. CAROL AHUJA East Highland
BOOKS
July 5, 1998
Virginia Laddey, retired stockbroker: "Possession: A Romance," by A. S. Byatt (Random House). "This book is an entrancing creation; it's a wonderful story, full of passion and poetry, about two scholars who reconstruct a clandestine and torrid affair between two Victorian poets. It's quite exciting and intelligent." **** Michael Tronick, film editor: "Fall from Grace," by Clyde Phillips (Morrow). "It's the 'perfect summer read.'
NEWS
March 30, 2000
In Josh Getlin's recent article about the New Yorker, I am described as a longtime contributor who recently wrote to David Remnick, the editor of the New Yorker, that the magazine has "lost its way," because it has become timelier and quicker to respond to events. This is inaccurate. The statement attributed to me was taken from the last paragraph of an article entitled "Cop-Out at the New Yorker," which appeared in the May 1999 issue of Brill's Content. In that article, I rebuked Mr. Remnick for refusing to print any correction of a serious error the New Yorker had made in January 1999, when it published a piece declaring that there was no scientific evidence to show that trichloroethylene (the chemical made famous by Jonathan Harr's book "A Civil Action," and by the film of the same title starring John Travolta)
NEWS
October 17, 1995 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meet Jan Schlichtmann, personal-injury lawyer on the brink of self-destruction. It is July, 1986, and Schlichtmann's black Porsche 928 has just been repossessed. His luxury condo, with a view of the Charles River, is about to be foreclosed, his office furniture removed for non-payment of rental fees. Nor has he paid the salaries of his loyal staff in months, nor the cleaning bills for his hand-tailored Dimitri suits and silk Hermes ties, now held hostage by the dry cleaner.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"A Civil Action" comes close, achingly close, to greatness. Finely cast, classically shot, written and directed with sureness and skill and based on a book compelling enough to stay on bestseller lists for two years, it's a story told so confidently and well that it seems fated to succeed. But as proficient a job as writer-director Steve Zaillian and his team do, "A Civil Action" has unmistakably unraveled by its close.
BOOKS
June 12, 2005 | James Marcus, James Marcus is the author of "Amazonia."
BookExpo America 2005 got rolling a week ago Friday with neither a bang nor a whimper, but a shriek. As the participants filed into Manhattan's Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, a bagpiper paraded around the lobby, swelling hearts and shredding eardrums. Was this a subliminal wake-up call to the industry itself, which has been struggling with stagnating sales and a multimedia-driven culture? Perhaps.
NEWS
March 17, 1999 | IRENE LACHER
There was a sighting of a rare bird in American musical theater at the Ahmanson on Friday evening--Stephen Sondheim, composer-lyricist extraordinaire. Sondheim is known for shunning the spotlight, and it took more than the usual bait to get him to the theater. Yes, there were stars of TV and stage Kelsey Grammer and Christine Baranski resurrecting Sondheim's ghoulish musical "Sweeney Todd" as part of the "Reprise! Broadway's Best in Concert" series.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1999 | SHAUNA SNOW
STAGE 'Hughie' Replaces 'Tiger': When Al Pacino takes the stage of the Mark Taper Forum in Eugene O'Neill's 1941 play "Hughie" (June 27 to July 25), he'll be reprising a role that he played first at the Long Wharf Theatre in Connecticut and then on Broadway in 1996. This high-profile replacement fills a hole left when South African playwright-actor-director Athol Fugard decided that he will no longer act, prompting the cancellation of his play "The Captain's Tiger."
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