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BUSINESS
February 17, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Months after Steve Jobs' death, fans are still flocking to his home, sometimes by the busload, to pay homage to the Apple founder. It's a pilgrimage that thousands have made, some from as far away as Italy and Hong Kong. They also visit Jobs' childhood home in nearby Los Altos, Calif., where he started Apple in the garage, and the Cupertino headquarters of the company that is now the world's most valuable. But his home is the most popular stop on a sightseeing circuit of Jobs' Silicon Valley: The Palo Alto neighborhood where Jobs' silver Mercedes is still parked, still without a license plate, on a quiet street flanked by majestic old trees and historic homes.
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BUSINESS
May 1, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Now that second-quarter earnings and Apple's massive bond offering are behind us, speculation has shifted back to products. And the big product that has tongues wagging is some reportedly radical changes to the operating system that powers the company's iPhones and iPads.  Much of the drama surrounds the fact that Jonathan Ive, Apple's longtime hardware design guru, has also been placed in charge of software design as well. That happened last fall following a management shakeup.  Ive is now s enior vice president of i ndustrial design.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
First, Apple's Jonny Ive, the man credited with being the design genius behind the company's products, got a knighthood. That's Sir Jonny Ive, thank you very much.  Now the British designer has received another honor from his home country: a Blue Peter badge. To which U.S. readers may ask: "What's that?"  QUIZ: Test y our Apple knowledge Good question. "Blue Peter" is a children's TV show that has been running in Britain for about 50 years. The badge is presented to people for inspiring kids.
AUTOS
November 5, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
$250,000 buys a lot exotic curb candy. This kind of cash will net a nice Lamborghini Gallardo. Perhaps an Aston Martin DB9 Volante. A Ferrari 458 Italia is even possible. Or, $250,000 can buy a hand-built pickup truck with gobs more exclusivity than these three, and a cloak of anonymity they don't offer. Icon, the Chatsworth-based shop known for custom replica Broncos, FJ Cruisers and CJ-style Jeeps, unveiled such a truck Tuesday at the 2013 SEMA show in Las Vegas. PHOTOS: Icon's new Thriftmaster pickup Dubbed the Thriftmaster, the truck is a modern -- and powerful -- interpretation of a postwar icon.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2012 | By David Sarno
Apple Inc. is so secretive about its unreleased phones, tablets, computers and -- potentially -- TVs, that you could almost say that the phrase "notoriously secretive" has become an unofficial Apple slogan. But it's not quite true that Apple keeps everything in a lockbox. The flip side of the company's obsession with secrecy is that its leaders have learned how to use the fact vacuum to their advantage. While the company never discloses product details ahead of time, its executives do drop not-too-subtle hints about upcoming gadgets, sparking weeks of speculation until the next morsel is dropped.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
With a new book coming out slagging Apple CEO Tim Cook for not being Steve Jobs ( it's called "Haunted Empire" --get it?), you should expect lots of specious comparisons of the reigns of the two Apple chieftains to reach the popular press. John Gruber at Daring Fireball points out one common misconception in a laudable effort to throttle it in its crib: the notion that since Jobs' death, Apple's " share price has slumped and it has lost its title of the world's most valuable firm.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Yahoo's Marissa Mayer just landed some plum talent from Silicon Valley's design guru: Apple. "I'm happy to join Yahoo! today as Principal Designer. Marissa Ann Louie + Marissa Ann Mayer = Yahoo! - at Yahoo! HQ,” former Apple designer Marissa Louie wrote in a Facebook post. Louie has an impressive track record as a designer at Apple, Ness and elsewhere. Her jump to Yahoo signals the dramatic rise of the designer in Silicon Valley. (Think Jony Ive .) Inspired by Apple, designers -- not engineers -- are the ones with the all-important job of making technology smart, simple to use and elegant.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1998 | CHARLES PILLER
Looking for unmistakable evidence that Apple has awoken from its long slumber to reclaim its identity? The most striking sign I've seen is the industrial design of the iMac, the new machine for the consumer and education market, due out in August. Innovative industrial design--a term that refers to how a machine's parts fit together but primarily denotes the look and feel of a device--has historically been one of the Mac's trademarks.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2009 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and Jessica Guynn
The decision by Apple Inc. boss Steve Jobs to take a medical leave after learning that his health issues were "more complex" than originally thought renews questions about the succession plan of a company whose fate has been closely linked to its charismatic leader. On Wednesday, only a week after assuring investors that he felt fit to lead the Silicon Valley giant, Jobs wrote in an e-mail to employees that he would pass day-to-day management duties to Tim Cook, Apple's chief operating officer, until the end of June.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2012 | By Andrea Chang and Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Tim Cook is no Steve Jobs - and so far, that hasn't been a problem for Apple Inc. It has become the world's most valuable company, adding about $265 billion in value since Cook became chief executive 13 months ago. Shares have soared 76% and profits continue to rise. Investors feel valued with Cook lending them an ear and handing them a dividend. But all that may not be enough. With Apple poised to announce the long-awaited iPhone 5 on Wednesday and reap heavy sales from it, analysts and software developers are looking beyond the product launch to whether Cook can set his own course at the company after the death of its co-founder.
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