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Jonathan Jay Pollard

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OPINION
February 11, 2011 | By Frank Anderson
In January, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu sent a letter to President Obama asking for the early release of Jonathan Jay Pollard, who was convicted of spying for Israel and sentenced to life in prison in 1987. The United States has steadfastly refused? requests for Pollard's release; it has every reason to continue that policy. The Pollard clemency pleas are partly based on the close relationship between Israel and the United States. Under this theory, spying for Israel was not serious because it was on behalf of an ally and a friendly government, rather than an enemy of America.
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OPINION
February 11, 2011 | By Frank Anderson
In January, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu sent a letter to President Obama asking for the early release of Jonathan Jay Pollard, who was convicted of spying for Israel and sentenced to life in prison in 1987. The United States has steadfastly refused? requests for Pollard's release; it has every reason to continue that policy. The Pollard clemency pleas are partly based on the close relationship between Israel and the United States. Under this theory, spying for Israel was not serious because it was on behalf of an ally and a friendly government, rather than an enemy of America.
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NEWS
July 16, 1988 | Associated Press
Jonathan Jay Pollard, a former Navy analyst convicted of spying for Israel, has ended a four-day hunger strike at the federal prison here, officials said. Pollard began the hunger strike because he believed his letters were not being delivered and because he thought attorneys were being barred from visiting him, his father, Morris, said.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2008 | Richard B. Schmitt and Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writers
Federal authorities arrested an 84-year-old former Army engineer Tuesday on charges of passing American military secrets to an Israeli agent in the 1980s, accusations that suggest that one of the most famous spy cases in U.S. history may have been more widespread than previously known. Ben-ami Kadish, a U.S.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
Anne Henderson Pollard, wife of convicted spy Jonathan Jay Pollard, left the federal prison here for a 12-day furlough to spend Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur with her family, a prison spokesman said. Mrs. Pollard was sentenced to five years in prison as an accessory after the fact to her husband's crimes.
NEWS
July 2, 1987
Convicted spy Jonathan Jay Pollard asked a federal judge to reduce his life sentence for selling thousands of pages of classified documents to Israel. In a motion to reduce Pollard's sentence, defense attorney Richard Hibey disputed the government's assertion that the former civilian Navy intelligence analyst had severely damaged national security. Pollard and his wife, Anne Henderson-Pollard, were arrested after they unsuccessfully sought political asylum at the Israeli Embassy in Washington.
NEWS
June 9, 1986
Israel, maintaining that it has given full cooperation in the Pollard spy scandal, reiterated that it is involved in no other espionage activity against the United States. A statement issued after a meeting of the Israeli Cabinet also expressed concern over "unfounded pronouncements" of undisclosed espionage. Former U.S. naval intelligence analyst Jonathan Jay Pollard pleaded guilty last week to charges of conspiring to deliver secret information to Israel.
NEWS
December 12, 1987 | Associated Press
The jailed wife of convicted spy Jonathan Jay Pollard was taken to a hospital Friday after her health deteriorated during her incarceration, government officials. Anne Henderson-Pollard was moved from the Lexington, Ky., hospital prison to the Federal Medical Center in Rochester, Minn. She was later checked into Methodist Hospital, which is affiliated with Mayor Clinic, reportedly for tests related to her condition, known as intestinal dyskinesia, a disease that prevents digestion.
NEWS
April 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The American section of the World Jewish Congress, representing 40 U.S. Jewish groups, called in New York for the commutation of Jonathan Jay Pollard's life sentence for spying for Israel. Pollard's lawyers are expected to ask a federal appeals court in a few months to grant him a new trial. In a statement, the group asked that Pollard's sentence be commuted to time already served--just over six years. Pollard, a U.S.
NEWS
January 16, 1989
Anne Henderson-Pollard, who admitted helping her husband spy for Israel, has been transferred from the Federal Detention Center in Danbury, Conn., to a medical center in Rochester, Minn., for evaluation and possible medical treatment, authorities said. Carol Pollard, sister of imprisoned spy Jonathan Jay Pollard, said her sister-in-law collapsed last week at the Danbury facility and was taken to a local hospital before her transfer.
NEWS
December 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. Richard C. Shelby (R-Ala.), chairman of the Select Committee on Intelligence, is again urging President Clinton not to commute the life sentence of Jonathan Jay Pollard, a former Navy analyst who pleaded guilty in 1986 to spying for Israel. Two years ago, Benjamin Netanyahu, then Israel's prime minister, requested clemency for Pollard during U.S.-brokered Middle East peace talks. Clinton agreed to review the case but, after an outcry by Shelby and others in the U.S.
NEWS
December 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
President Clinton has set a Jan. 11 deadline for law enforcement and national security officials to recommend whether to grant clemency to convicted spy Jonathan Pollard. While Clinton promised Israel he would take a fresh look at Pollard's case, U.S. legal and intelligence communities have bitterly opposed releasing him from prison. Nevertheless, officials said Thursday they would review the matter anew.
NEWS
October 26, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Sunday equated his determined campaign to win the freedom of convicted spy Jonathan Jay Pollard with U.S. efforts to get back American soldiers missing in action. In what amounted to a plea on Pollard's behalf to an American television audience, Netanyahu said on NBC-TV's "Meet the Press" that he hoped "the sense of mercy will prevail." Pollard was a civilian intelligence analyst for the U.S.
NEWS
October 24, 1998 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Eleven years have passed since Jonathan Jay Pollard was sentenced to prison for life, yet the raw sore left by the former Navy intelligence analyst's spying for Israel caused a last-minute snag Friday in the Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. Disagreement still rages over how much Pollard's espionage damaged United States security; Caspar W. Weinberger, defense secretary at the time of his arrest, said a greater harm was difficult to imagine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1996
Re "Navy Analyst Charged With Passing Secrets to S. Korea," Sept. 26: It is appalling. Jonathan Jay Pollard pleads guilty to passing secrets to Israel (secrets the U.S. was under agreement to give to Israel), and he gets a life sentence. Robert Chaegon Kim gives classified documents to South Korea, and "if convicted, could face up to 10 years in prison." Where is the justice? Pollard has already served 10 years. At the very least he deserves to be released. A. HAROLD JANKEN Los Angeles
NEWS
July 28, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jonathan Pollard, imprisoned more than 10 years ago for spying for Israel, will remain behind bars after President Clinton rejected his plea for clemency. Pollard's wife, Esther, declared in Israel that she would stage a hunger strike "until death" for his release. She accused Israel's new prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, of failing to fight hard enough for her husband's freedom. Clinton's decision was a blow to Israeli and U.S.
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
President Clinton rejected a clemency plea from convicted spy Jonathan Pollard on Friday, citing the enormity of his crime, his lack of remorse and the damage he caused to U.S. security. The decision was a blow to Israeli and American Jewish groups, which had campaigned for his release from a life sentence. Pollard has served more than 10 years.
NEWS
January 31, 1996 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
News of a Pentagon memo warning that Israel might be using American Jews to spy on military contractors comes at a bad time for the Israeli government's quiet efforts to win the release of Jonathan Pollard, an American Jew who spied for Israel. The internal memo, asserting that Israel was trying to steal U.S. military and industrial secrets by exploiting "strong ethnic ties" in the United States, raises anew the specter of American Jews with a dual loyalty.
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