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Jonathan Joseph

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BUSINESS
July 3, 2002 | Bloomberg News
National Semiconductor Corp. shares fell 17% after a Salomon Smith Barney analyst said orders for chips used in personal computers and flat-panel displays will slow this quarter. National Semi slid $4.58 to $22.75 on the New York Stock Exchange. Demand is slipping in the chip maker's PC and flat-panel businesses, which together account for 24% of sales, Salomon's Jonathan Joseph wrote in a note to clients.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What would you have if you could combine, say, the virtuosic bass playing of Jaco Pastorius, the fluid vocal style of George Benson and the voice/instrument interplay of Joao Gilberto? Something pretty special, obviously. But take it a step further. Suppose all this was filtered through an African cultural consciousness.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2000 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Intel Corp. rebounded Wednesday from two consecutive disappointing quarters, announcing record profit in its fourth quarter, fueled by strong holiday-season sales of its microprocessors to PC companies. The company's 69-cents-per-share profit solidly beat the 63 cents expected by analysts monitored by First Call Corp. Intel's fourth-quarter profit rose 15% to $2.4 billion, compared with $2.08 billion, or 60 cents a share, a year earlier, excluding expenses for acquisitions.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1997 | GREG MILLER
No. 1, Times 100; No. 1, Absolute Profits; No. 1, Market Value If only the paranoid survive, as Intel Corp. Chief Executive Andrew Grove said in the title of his recent best-selling book, then Intel must be abundantly paranoid. The company dominates this year's Times 100 charts: It leads the state's companies in profit, market value and cash flow and is near the top in sales, work-force size and other categories.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1993 | From Reuters
Buoyed by a boom in personal-computer sales, chip maker Intel Corp. reported Monday that its first-quarter earnings nearly tripled from a year earlier. Intel said it earned $547.9 million in the quarter, or $2.48 a share, up from $184 million, or 86 cents a share, in the first quarter of 1992. Revenue jumped about 63%, to $2.02 billion from $1.24 billion. Intel credited lower computer prices--which have triggered a consumer buying spree--for the rise.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2001 | MAY WONG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Intel Corp. said Tuesday it will delay raises, cut back on hiring and slash spending, joining other high-tech companies in belt-tightening amid a slowing economy and sluggish personal computer sales. The $34-billion chip-making company hopes to save "hundreds of millions of dollars" with the cost-cutting measures, Intel spokesman Robert Manetta said. Layoffs are not part of the plan.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Price cuts for Intel Corp. chips won't be as big next year or come as often as they have, an industry analyst said Monday--even as the chip maker unveiled new technology that will make snails out of today's fastest microprocessors. Intel will trim prices in January by an average of 14%, a smaller margin than its reductions earlier this year and "one of the mildest cuts in memory," analyst Jonathan Joseph of Salomon Smith Barney in San Francisco wrote in a note to investors.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1998 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Semiconductor stocks moved upward sharply Tuesday on news of a report by the Semiconductor Industry Assn. that shows a 4.2% increase in industry revenues in September compared with August. Sales in September totaled $10.22 billion, according to the report, which will be released today. Santa Clara-based Intel Corp., the top maker of microprocessors, rose $4.44 to close at $94.81 on Nasdaq. Micron Technology, a leading memory-chip manufacturer, gained $3.56 to close at $43.75 on the NYSE.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1998 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign that the semiconductor and PC industries could finally be emerging from a prolonged slump, Intel Corp. said Thursday that its third-quarter revenue will rise 8% to 10% over the second quarter, a substantial increase from previously anticipated flat sales. "Intel is certainly the bellwether company in the PC marketplace because they are seeing demand from all the PC suppliers," said Linley Gwennap, a chip analyst with MicroDesign Resources in Sebastopol, Calif.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Intel Corp. plans this month to slash prices on its top-of-the-line Pentium 4 microprocessors by 54% to stimulate underwhelming demand, analysts who spoke with the company said Monday. The news sent shares of the No. 1 chip maker down $1.40 to $30.28 on Nasdaq and dragged down other technology shares as well. More typical price cuts for microprocessors, which are the brains of personal computers, are in the 30% range.
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