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Jonathan Kellerman

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Perverted plutocrats, a Hollywood madam with a narcissism problem, prostitutes with attitude, indulgent rich kids — Jonathan Kellerman's latest novel has so many unpleasant characters it would be wearying to read if the plot didn't move like a bullet train. Kellerman himself is unapologetic. "I like to create twisted characters," he says with a laugh. "It's just what I do: I'm a psychologist. Ever since I've been a kid I've had a fascination with the darker side of things. " The author, 61, is not a dark guy. Wearing faded jeans and a black mock-turtleneck, he's sitting in a room that includes shelves of books, a painting canvas, a pool table and a view of his ample yard and swimming pool.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Perverted plutocrats, a Hollywood madam with a narcissism problem, prostitutes with attitude, indulgent rich kids — Jonathan Kellerman's latest novel has so many unpleasant characters it would be wearying to read if the plot didn't move like a bullet train. Kellerman himself is unapologetic. "I like to create twisted characters," he says with a laugh. "It's just what I do: I'm a psychologist. Ever since I've been a kid I've had a fascination with the darker side of things. " The author, 61, is not a dark guy. Wearing faded jeans and a black mock-turtleneck, he's sitting in a room that includes shelves of books, a painting canvas, a pool table and a view of his ample yard and swimming pool.
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NEWS
May 5, 1999
Bestselling author Jonathan Kellerman will speak at the fifth annual Mental Health Conference and Resource Fair on Thursday at the Hyatt Regency Alicante Hotel in Garden Grove. Kellerman, author of "When the Bough Breaks" and "Billy Straight," will speak after a luncheon at 11:30 a.m. He'll also sign copies of his books after his talk. The event is co-sponsored by the Mental Health Assn. of Orange County, PacificCare and Aspen Community Services. A resource fair will begin at 10:30 a.m.
BOOKS
April 15, 2007
Los Angeles Times/April 15, 2007 *--* Fiction weeks on list 1. The Watchman by Robert Crais (Simon & Schuster: $25.95) 6 A party-girl heiress reluctantly accepts a former cop's protection after witnessing a crime. 2. Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult (Atria: $26.95) A small 4 New England town tries to cope after a troubled teen kills 10 at the local high school. 3. What Is the What by Dave Eggers (McSweeney's: $26) A 14 Sudanese refugee finds safety and a sense of belonging elusive in America. 4.
BOOKS
April 26, 1987 | Dick Lochte, Lochte's mystery, "Sleeping Dog," is a Warner paperback
Jonathan Kellerman's award-winning first novel, "When the Bough Breaks," was about child molestation and family secrets. His second, "Blood Test," was about child abduction and family secrets. "Over the Edge," his third and latest, is about child persecution and family secrets. A pattern seems to be emerging here, and, surprisingly enough, it is a good one for readers.
BOOKS
March 13, 1988 | Mort Kamins, Kamins is a free-lance writer. and
Sexual Perversity in Jerusalem: Once it was war's barbarity that gave the name Butcher's Theater to the hills of Jerusalem. Now, in Jonathan Kellerman's long ambitious thriller, a depraved knife-wielding serial killer--whom the sensationalist press comes to call the "Butcher"--leaves the carved-up bodies of young Arab women around those same hills. Among the many pleasures of this book is Kellerman's rendering of modern Jerusalem in all its fantastic complexity.
NEWS
January 8, 1992 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Imagine that Philip Marlowe--a seeker after truth, worldly wise but noble, undaunted by even the darkest secrets of the heart or mind--has been reincarnated as a Beverly Hills psychologist in the '90s, and you will have a good take on Dr. Alexander Delaware, the shrink-turned-dick in Jonathan Kellerman's latest psychological whodunit, "Private Eyes." It's the sixth outing for Delaware, but there's no flagging of energy or thinning of the blood here.
BOOKS
February 16, 1997 | MARGO KAUFMAN, Margo Kaufman is a regular contributor to Book Review
What makes a mystery a runaway bestseller as opposed to a cult favorite? While there's no accounting for public taste (witness the alarming success of "The Rules" by Ellen Fein and Sherrie Schneider), in reading The Clinic, Jonathan Kellerman's 11th Alex Delaware book, certain elements emerged as basic requirements. As any Realtor knows, location is critical, and after last year's disappointing "The Web," set on a tropical island far too reminiscent of Dr. Moreau's, Kellerman has returned to his home turf: Los Angeles, a city he clearly loves, warts and all, and describes better than any author since Raymond Chandler.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2004 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
For his new thriller, a unique combination of police procedural and coming of age novel, Jonathan Kellerman has sidelined his longtime series hero Alex Delaware in favor of intuitive but emotional LAPD homicide detective Petra Connor. The volatile Petra made her debut six years ago as protagonist of the novel "Billy Straight," then reappeared last year in "A Cold Heart," playing second lead to Alex but nearly nudging the considerably less dynamic doctor from center stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2004 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
For all their writing lives, Faye and Jonathan Kellerman had a glib answer to the incessant question. No, they were not going to combine talents and do a book together. No need for a married couple to play with explosives around the house, they would say. Who knows what kind of sparks they'd touch off by trying to contain two egos in one volume. Besides, they'd say, there's economics to consider. A pair of bestselling authors gets more space on the bookstore shelves if they write separately.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2004 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
For his new thriller, a unique combination of police procedural and coming of age novel, Jonathan Kellerman has sidelined his longtime series hero Alex Delaware in favor of intuitive but emotional LAPD homicide detective Petra Connor. The volatile Petra made her debut six years ago as protagonist of the novel "Billy Straight," then reappeared last year in "A Cold Heart," playing second lead to Alex but nearly nudging the considerably less dynamic doctor from center stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2004 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
For all their writing lives, Faye and Jonathan Kellerman had a glib answer to the incessant question. No, they were not going to combine talents and do a book together. No need for a married couple to play with explosives around the house, they would say. Who knows what kind of sparks they'd touch off by trying to contain two egos in one volume. Besides, they'd say, there's economics to consider. A pair of bestselling authors gets more space on the bookstore shelves if they write separately.
BOOKS
October 20, 2002 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
"Q is for Quarry," Sue Grafton's 17th Santa Teresa caper, begins at Grayson Quarry beside Highway 1 near Lompoc, just north of Santa Teresa, where the corpse of an unknown girl is found in the summer of 1969. The Jane Doe and her killer remain unidentified and the mystery unsolved until a lifetime later when the two police detectives who failed to crack the case get back on the trail. They are both retired and afflicted with the ills of age; reopening the case provides an interest.
NEWS
December 21, 1999 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The "monster" in Jonathan Kellerman's latest Alex Delaware mystery seems easy enough to identify. He's Ardis Peake, who slaughtered a farm family in the San Joaquin Valley town of Treadway 16 years ago. Ever since, he's been locked up at Starkweather Hospital for the criminally insane in East Los Angeles, making no friends, receiving no visitors, twitching with "tardive symptoms" from massive doses of Thorazine, and hardly saying a word. Suddenly, however, Peake begins talking.
NEWS
May 5, 1999
Bestselling author Jonathan Kellerman will speak at the fifth annual Mental Health Conference and Resource Fair on Thursday at the Hyatt Regency Alicante Hotel in Garden Grove. Kellerman, author of "When the Bough Breaks" and "Billy Straight," will speak after a luncheon at 11:30 a.m. He'll also sign copies of his books after his talk. The event is co-sponsored by the Mental Health Assn. of Orange County, PacificCare and Aspen Community Services. A resource fair will begin at 10:30 a.m.
BOOKS
April 15, 2007
Los Angeles Times/April 15, 2007 *--* Fiction weeks on list 1. The Watchman by Robert Crais (Simon & Schuster: $25.95) 6 A party-girl heiress reluctantly accepts a former cop's protection after witnessing a crime. 2. Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult (Atria: $26.95) A small 4 New England town tries to cope after a troubled teen kills 10 at the local high school. 3. What Is the What by Dave Eggers (McSweeney's: $26) A 14 Sudanese refugee finds safety and a sense of belonging elusive in America. 4.
NEWS
December 21, 1999 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The "monster" in Jonathan Kellerman's latest Alex Delaware mystery seems easy enough to identify. He's Ardis Peake, who slaughtered a farm family in the San Joaquin Valley town of Treadway 16 years ago. Ever since, he's been locked up at Starkweather Hospital for the criminally insane in East Los Angeles, making no friends, receiving no visitors, twitching with "tardive symptoms" from massive doses of Thorazine, and hardly saying a word. Suddenly, however, Peake begins talking.
BOOKS
January 24, 1999 | MICHAEL HARRIS, Michael Harris frequently reviews books for Southern California Living
Jonathan Kellerman was a child psychologist before he began writing fiction. The hero of most of his previous 14 suspense novels, Dr. Alex Delaware, is a child psychologist too. So Kellerman would seem to be leading from strength in making the title character in "Billy Straight"--the sole witness to a knife slaying in Griffith Park--a 12-year-old kid. Billy is a runaway.
BOOKS
February 16, 1997 | MARGO KAUFMAN, Margo Kaufman is a regular contributor to Book Review
What makes a mystery a runaway bestseller as opposed to a cult favorite? While there's no accounting for public taste (witness the alarming success of "The Rules" by Ellen Fein and Sherrie Schneider), in reading The Clinic, Jonathan Kellerman's 11th Alex Delaware book, certain elements emerged as basic requirements. As any Realtor knows, location is critical, and after last year's disappointing "The Web," set on a tropical island far too reminiscent of Dr. Moreau's, Kellerman has returned to his home turf: Los Angeles, a city he clearly loves, warts and all, and describes better than any author since Raymond Chandler.
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