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Jonathan Kozol

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March 17, 1985 | David G. Savage, Savage is a Times education writer. and
What can those of us who can read do for those who can't? Jonathan Kozol, author of "Illiterate America," would say first: "Become alarmed." He estimates that 60 million Americans are either totally illiterate or can barely read, about one-third of the nation's adults. This "invisible minority" not only suffers exclusion from the benefits, economic and political, of this nation, he says, but also poses a danger to the rest of us.
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August 26, 2007 | Erin Aubry Kaplan, Erin Aubry Kaplan is a contributing editor to The Times' Opinion page.
If only it could have been one book. Such was my wishful thinking, infused with a certain anger, as I read "Letters to a Young Teacher" and "A Class Apart," two up-close accounts of two radically different public school experiences written by, respectively, veteran educator Jonathan Kozol and Washington Post reporter Alec Klein. Of course, I figured just by the titles and authors that I was in for much more contrast than convergence.
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BOOKS
October 6, 1991 | Samuel G. Freedman, Freedman is the author of "Small Victories: The Real World of a Teacher, Her Students and Their High School" (HarperCollins), a finalist for the 1990 National Book Award. He is now writing a book about a black church in Brooklyn
In the republic of pluck and elbow grease, the mythic America that exerts such influence on the actual one, the playing field is invariably level. Class and race matter not. They exist, of course, but only as incidental traits, spices for the melting pot. We want to see our nation as one of those populist bomber crews from a war movie, superficially diverse but ultimately equal. This ideal, however, harbors a dark side.
BOOKS
September 18, 2005 | Sandy Banks, Sandy Banks is a staff writer who has written about education issues for The Times.
IN the same way the searing images of New Orleans' post-Katrina dispossessed -- poor, black, herded together in squalor and left by officialdom to fend for themselves -- brought into focus hidden dimensions of poverty and its nexus with race, social critic Jonathan Kozol's latest book shines a spotlight on poor, minority children, sabotaged and isolated by an educational system tilted to slight them.
NEWS
November 8, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not 12 minutes away on the No. 6 subway line is a land of luxury, limou sines and ladies who lunch. It is not inconceivable that in that section of Manhattan--the Upper East Side ZIP code that was home to Jacqueline Onassis, for just one glamorous example--apartment owners pay annual garage fees in excess of $3,700. Certainly many of the luncheon ladies spend that much at the hairdresser each year.
BOOKS
February 7, 1988 | Garry Abrams, Abrams is a Times staff writer. and
R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr., editor of the conservative magazine, The American Spectator, wrote a column this month to award prizes for the worst books of 1987. The winner for fiction, "Forgotten Voices, Unforgettable Dreams," was a collection of essays by homeless people, described by Tyrrell as "vagrants." Edited by a woman who works with the homeless in New York City, the book didn't measure up to his rigorous standards, Tyrrell said.
NEWS
November 17, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a mystery to many people, particularly those who have pulled themselves up by the bootstraps, why the chronically poor in this country fail to better themselves. The United States is the land of opportunity: Why don't those on the lowest rungs of the social ladder work harder, resist temptation, save their nickels, plan for the long term? If I can make it, say those who have, so can Joe Blow, regardless of race or background, education or environment.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Jonathan Kozol wants his book to change the world. It's not an unusual--if usually hopeless--ambition. But Kozol is actually getting a chance--and a lot of help. Armed with copies of Kozol's "Rachel and Her Children," booksellers will meet with governors of more than 20 states today to urge them to take action against homelessness.
BOOKS
June 25, 2000 | KAY MILLS, Kay Mills is the author of "Something Better for My Children: How Head Start Has Changed the Lives of Millions of Children" and "This Little Light of Mine: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer."
The children of Mott Haven in the South Bronx are "small but mystical and interesting beings" despite the poverty and violence of their neighborhood. They are loving, whimsical, depressed, insightful or cranky, just like kids everywhere. They survive and regularly resurrect themselves. Taller and older but no less mystical and interesting are the teenagers in the program for gifted students at Crenshaw High School in South-Central L.A.
NEWS
November 17, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a mystery to many people, particularly those who have pulled themselves up by the bootstraps, why the chronically poor in this country fail to better themselves. The United States is the land of opportunity: Why don't those on the lowest rungs of the social ladder work harder, resist temptation, save their nickels, plan for the long term? If I can make it, say those who have, so can Joe Blow, regardless of race or background, education or environment.
NEWS
November 8, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not 12 minutes away on the No. 6 subway line is a land of luxury, limou sines and ladies who lunch. It is not inconceivable that in that section of Manhattan--the Upper East Side ZIP code that was home to Jacqueline Onassis, for just one glamorous example--apartment owners pay annual garage fees in excess of $3,700. Certainly many of the luncheon ladies spend that much at the hairdresser each year.
BOOKS
October 6, 1991 | Samuel G. Freedman, Freedman is the author of "Small Victories: The Real World of a Teacher, Her Students and Their High School" (HarperCollins), a finalist for the 1990 National Book Award. He is now writing a book about a black church in Brooklyn
In the republic of pluck and elbow grease, the mythic America that exerts such influence on the actual one, the playing field is invariably level. Class and race matter not. They exist, of course, but only as incidental traits, spices for the melting pot. We want to see our nation as one of those populist bomber crews from a war movie, superficially diverse but ultimately equal. This ideal, however, harbors a dark side.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Jonathan Kozol wants his book to change the world. It's not an unusual--if usually hopeless--ambition. But Kozol is actually getting a chance--and a lot of help. Armed with copies of Kozol's "Rachel and Her Children," booksellers will meet with governors of more than 20 states today to urge them to take action against homelessness.
BOOKS
September 18, 2005 | Sandy Banks, Sandy Banks is a staff writer who has written about education issues for The Times.
IN the same way the searing images of New Orleans' post-Katrina dispossessed -- poor, black, herded together in squalor and left by officialdom to fend for themselves -- brought into focus hidden dimensions of poverty and its nexus with race, social critic Jonathan Kozol's latest book shines a spotlight on poor, minority children, sabotaged and isolated by an educational system tilted to slight them.
BOOKS
February 7, 1988 | Garry Abrams, Abrams is a Times staff writer. and
R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr., editor of the conservative magazine, The American Spectator, wrote a column this month to award prizes for the worst books of 1987. The winner for fiction, "Forgotten Voices, Unforgettable Dreams," was a collection of essays by homeless people, described by Tyrrell as "vagrants." Edited by a woman who works with the homeless in New York City, the book didn't measure up to his rigorous standards, Tyrrell said.
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