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April 14, 1996 | Patrick Pacheco, Patrick Pacheco is a frequent contributor to Calendar
It was closing night for the new musical "Rent" at the New York Theatre Workshop, a 150-seat East Village theater where the pop opera, loosely based on Puccini's "La Boheme," opened in February. Onstage, friends and creative personnel, including director Michael Greif, mingled with the youthful cast and band in the kind of pizza-and-beer ritual that has been repeated countless times in experimental theater spaces. But this celebration was distinctly different.
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NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Daniel Rothberg
“What does # YOLO (You Only Live Once) mean to you?” In 200 to 250 words. Go! For my answer, I'll defer to a definition from Urban Dictionary: “ Carpe diem for stupid people.” And for its use in a sentence, I'll again turn to that site: Guy 1: “Hey i heard that you broke ur leg falling off the balcony at that party.” Dumbass 1: “Ya but hey YOLO.” When thousands of high school seniors fill out their applications to...
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
When "Rent," a rock musical version of Puccini's "La Boheme" opened off-Broadway last February, Jonathan Larson garnered the kind of rave reviews that young, struggling composer-lyricists pray and dream for. Larson wasn't there to read the reviews--he died of an aortic aneurysm on the night of the final dress rehearsal at the age of 35. His opus depicts the life he knew--the disease- and drug-plagued but joyous Bohemia of New York's East Village, circa 1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2001 | BLAKE GREEN, NEWSDAY
The late Jonathan Larson had memorable eyes and curly hair, two things he shared in common with Raul Esparza, the actor who portrays the playwright-songwriter in the semiautobiographical "tick, tick . . . BOOM!" at off-Broadway's Jane Street Theatre. The rock musical, from Larson's trunk of unproduced work, had been abandoned after he began concentrating on "Rent," a more ambitious project that would win the Pulitzer and Tony awards.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | Associated Press
Two hospitals where "Rent" playwright Jonathan Larson was treated before his death will be fined for misdiagnosing his severe chest pains, the state Health Department said Thursday. Larson, 35, was found dead in his apartment Jan. 25 just as "Rent," a 1990s version of "La Boheme," was about to open off-Broadway. The hit show later moved to Broadway and won four Tony awards. Larson died of a dissecting aortic aneurysm, a tear in the inner lining of the aorta, the department said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
The Tony Award- and Pulitzer Prize-winning musical "Rent," written by American playwright Jonathan Larson, who died on the night of its off-Broadway premiere, was a source of inspiration for eighth-grade honors student Philip Tanedo of Tarzana's Portola Middle School. Shortly after seeing the musical during its Los Angeles engagement last fall, Philip created a drawing that will take him and his mother, Priscilla, on an all-expenses-paid trip to the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1997
Bravo to Lewis Janowsky (Calendar Letters, Sept. 28). I suffered through the entirely incoherent first act of "Rent" in New York in April 1996. Nevertheless I returned for Act 2, thinking perhaps I could connect in some way. Unfortunately that didn't happen. Act 2 began with two women singing unintelligible lyrics to A Tone music. I left in despair. "Rent," like "Phantom," is a product of phenomenal hype. RICHARD GENOVESE Toluca Lake Does anybody else find it ironic that on the 40th anniversary of "West Side Story's" opening on Broadway, "the juggernaut that is 'Rent' " (as Laurie Winer described it in her review, Sept.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Daniel Rothberg
“What does # YOLO (You Only Live Once) mean to you?” In 200 to 250 words. Go! For my answer, I'll defer to a definition from Urban Dictionary: “ Carpe diem for stupid people.” And for its use in a sentence, I'll again turn to that site: Guy 1: “Hey i heard that you broke ur leg falling off the balcony at that party.” Dumbass 1: “Ya but hey YOLO.” When thousands of high school seniors fill out their applications to...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1997
The Times received approximately 35 letters objecting to Dr. Alice Glasser's Oct. 13 Counterpunch on "Rent." Here's a sampling: Rather than having a "cavalier approach" to the spread of AIDS in America, I felt Jonathan Larson had a deep sadness concerning the fate of many of his characters, much as Puccini had dealing with the prevalence of tuberculosis in Paris in the mid-19th century. LYNN MORGAN, Vice President Feature Production, Warner Bros. Nowhere in "Rent" is the spread of AIDS treated as a glorious, rebellious act. Nowhere is it implied that it's "no big deal to spread a fatal disease."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1997 | Don Shirley, Don Shirley is a Times staff writer
By this time next week, dramaturges throughout America may have a better idea of where they stand in the theatrical pecking order. That's because a decision is expected next week in Thomson vs. Larson. Dramaturge Lynn M. Thomson sued the estate of the late "Rent" creator Jonathan Larson, contending that she helped create the hit show, now at La Jolla Playhouse as well as on Broadway, and is entitled to 16% of the author's royalties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
The Tony Award- and Pulitzer Prize-winning musical "Rent," written by American playwright Jonathan Larson, who died on the night of its off-Broadway premiere, was a source of inspiration for eighth-grade honors student Philip Tanedo of Tarzana's Portola Middle School. Shortly after seeing the musical during its Los Angeles engagement last fall, Philip created a drawing that will take him and his mother, Priscilla, on an all-expenses-paid trip to the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1997
The Times received approximately 35 letters objecting to Dr. Alice Glasser's Oct. 13 Counterpunch on "Rent." Here's a sampling: Rather than having a "cavalier approach" to the spread of AIDS in America, I felt Jonathan Larson had a deep sadness concerning the fate of many of his characters, much as Puccini had dealing with the prevalence of tuberculosis in Paris in the mid-19th century. LYNN MORGAN, Vice President Feature Production, Warner Bros. Nowhere in "Rent" is the spread of AIDS treated as a glorious, rebellious act. Nowhere is it implied that it's "no big deal to spread a fatal disease."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1997
Bravo to Lewis Janowsky (Calendar Letters, Sept. 28). I suffered through the entirely incoherent first act of "Rent" in New York in April 1996. Nevertheless I returned for Act 2, thinking perhaps I could connect in some way. Unfortunately that didn't happen. Act 2 began with two women singing unintelligible lyrics to A Tone music. I left in despair. "Rent," like "Phantom," is a product of phenomenal hype. RICHARD GENOVESE Toluca Lake Does anybody else find it ironic that on the 40th anniversary of "West Side Story's" opening on Broadway, "the juggernaut that is 'Rent' " (as Laurie Winer described it in her review, Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1997 | PATRICK PACHECO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When "Rent," a musical by an obscure 35-year-old writer and composer, opened at the 100-seat New York Theatre Workshop nearly two years ago, few people could have predicted that it would be proclaimed a landmark and move to Broadway on a wave of positive reviews, multiple prizes and ecstatic press coverage.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1997 | Patrick Pacheco, Patrick Pacheco is a regular contributor to Calendar from New York
In August, 44-year-old Robert Trowbridge and his wife, Denise, were among the audience at an evening performance of "Rent" at the La Jolla Playhouse. A roofer from Escondido, Trowbridge hardly fit the demographic one might expect for a Broadway musical about New York's East Village bohemians, which includes a cross-dressing hero, lingering kisses between rubber-draped lesbians, heterosexual lovers who "meet cute" over a bag of heroin and homeless people with AIDS.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1997 | Don Shirley, Don Shirley is a Times staff writer
By this time next week, dramaturges throughout America may have a better idea of where they stand in the theatrical pecking order. That's because a decision is expected next week in Thomson vs. Larson. Dramaturge Lynn M. Thomson sued the estate of the late "Rent" creator Jonathan Larson, contending that she helped create the hit show, now at La Jolla Playhouse as well as on Broadway, and is entitled to 16% of the author's royalties.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1996 | SHAUNA SNOW
POP/ROCK Interscope Reigns: Bush's "Razorblade Suitcase" entered the nation's pop album sales chart Wednesday at No. 1, helping Interscope Records become the first distributor of the top four albums on the chart since Columbia Records did it in 1976.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1997 | Patrick Pacheco, Patrick Pacheco is a regular contributor to Calendar from New York
In August, 44-year-old Robert Trowbridge and his wife, Denise, were among the audience at an evening performance of "Rent" at the La Jolla Playhouse. A roofer from Escondido, Trowbridge hardly fit the demographic one might expect for a Broadway musical about New York's East Village bohemians, which includes a cross-dressing hero, lingering kisses between rubber-draped lesbians, heterosexual lovers who "meet cute" over a bag of heroin and homeless people with AIDS.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Say, isn't that Doogie Howser, M.D., singing about "mucho masturbation" with a bunch of grungers? My, how times have changed! In a mighty stroke of good casting, Neil Patrick Harris (TV's Doogie) morphs into Mark, a caustic East Village filmmaker struggling along the righteous path of art in "Rent," the musical theater sensation of 1996. "Rent" had its West Coast debut Sunday night at the La Jolla Playhouse, where it is still sensational.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | Associated Press
Two hospitals where "Rent" playwright Jonathan Larson was treated before his death will be fined for misdiagnosing his severe chest pains, the state Health Department said Thursday. Larson, 35, was found dead in his apartment Jan. 25 just as "Rent," a 1990s version of "La Boheme," was about to open off-Broadway. The hit show later moved to Broadway and won four Tony awards. Larson died of a dissecting aortic aneurysm, a tear in the inner lining of the aorta, the department said.
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