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Jonathan Larson

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1987 | KAREN ROEBUCK, Times Staff Writer
A 4-year-old girl was killed Saturday when a shotgun was fired into a large doghouse in Lancaster where she was playing, sheriff's deputies said. Marc Gillespie, 30, of Lancaster was arrested on suspicion of manslaughter and was being held in lieu of $22,000 bail. Deputy Chris Robbins said that Gillespie, who has a history of randomly firing guns after he drinks, had been drinking before the shooting.
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NEWS
June 3, 1996 | PATRICK PACHECO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Topping off what has been widely acknowledged as one of the most competitive seasons in recent Broadway history, the big winners at Sunday's Tony Awards were the groundbreaking musicals "Rent" and "Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk," which each took four honors. The Pulitzer-winning "Rent," a musical about East Village bohemians, won the top award, for best musical, over "Noise/Funk," the explosive rap-and-tap musical tale of African American history.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1996 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pulitzer- and Tony-winning musical "Rent" will open the Ahmanson Theatre's 1997-98 season in September and will play there at least 16 weeks, through January of 1998, theater officials announced Monday. "Rent" will come to Los Angeles from its previously announced summer engagement at the La Jolla Playhouse.
MAGAZINE
July 16, 2000 | KERRY MADDEN
My name is Annabelle Hunter, and I am a rather kind, outgoing and expressive beautician," 11-year-old Katya Hammerstein recites, "but the thought of helping was pushed to the back of my mind, because I was frozen on the spot."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
At the start of the 9 p.m. Tony Award telecast on Sunday, Nathan Lane noted it had been an exciting year on Broadway but he didn't really have time to tell us about it, as the show had to be off the air by 11 on the dot. In very quick succession, he landed good jokes on subjects as diverse as Julie Andrews' ruffled feathers, the proposed same-sex marriage legislation and the introduction of taped acceptance speeches for major awards into the Tony telecast.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
A musical being greeted by whoops of recognition and encouragement before even a note is sung? Is this the universe as we know it? The juggernaut that is "Rent" came to Los Angeles on Sunday night. If you haven't yet seen this 1996 rock-tinged, loose adaptation of "La Boheme" in New York, Boston, Minneapolis, Washington, or La Jolla, now's your chance to vote yea or nay. Directed and designed by the original team, the production at the Ahmanson Theatre offers the force of the original.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1997 | SANDRA TSING LOH, Sandra Tsing Loh is a Los Angeles-based writer and performer. Her new novel about bohemian L.A., "If You Lived Here, You'd Be Home by Now," was just published by Riverhead Books
With the successful L.A. runs this fall of Puccini's "La Boheme" and Jonathan Larson's "Rent," the age-old question arises: What is bohemia, and why do we find it so alluring? Even more intriguingly: Who are the bohemians of L.A.? What is their story? Shouldn't the lively artistic spirit of the Big Orange be captured in its own hit singing-and-dancing show? "Show?" a new voice keens.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2010 | By Evelyn McDonnell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On a recent weekday afternoon, Raúl Esparza is in his dressing room at the Ahmanson Theatre showing a visitor two boxes of flaky goodies filled with guava, dulce de leche and shredded meat. His hands shake. The actor of Cuban heritage has just discovered Porto's, the well-known local bakery that sells empanadas and rellenitos. A little later, he's waxing rhapsodic about Virginia Woolf's original manuscripts. "Her handwriting starts really small, but by the end, she's writing in these big strokes," he says, then quotes "The Waves," miming an expansive scrawl: "'Against you I will fling myself, unvanquished and unyielding, O Death!
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2010 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
At age 37, Neil Patrick Harris has worn more showbiz hats than most performers do in their entire careers. Starting his professional life as a child star, Harris has successfully graduated to film actor, sitcom leading man, Broadway actor, award-show staple, singer, magician and Web-series celebrity. Harris is that rare actor who is not only able to thrive in almost every medium, but also appeals to divergent demographics — young and old, gay and straight, highbrow snobs and lowbrow comedy fans.
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