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Jonathan Lethem

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October 18, 2009 | Akiva Gottlieb
Chronic City A Novel Jonathan Lethem Doubleday: 424 pp., $26.95 Strange things still happen in New York. Beginning in fall 2005, bemused residents called the city to complain about a maple syrup smell wafting across sections of Manhattan. Some blamed New Jersey. Others pointed to a candy factory. A few even suspected an unusually fragrant act of terrorism. Earlier this year, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg officially solved the "Great Maple Syrup Mystery" by linking it to fenugreek seeds from a food additives plant across the Hudson River.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
A film version of Jonathan Lethem's novel "Motherless Brooklyn" has been in the hands of  Edward Norton for more than 15 years. Last week, funding finally came through for the project , which is scheduled to begin filming in New York later this year. Published in 1999, "Motherless Brooklyn" is a novel about a small-time detective agency and a mobster's murder. What made it special -- it won that year's National Book Critics Circle award for fiction -- is its narrator, Lionel Essrog, and his unique voice.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
A film version of Jonathan Lethem's novel "Motherless Brooklyn" has been in the hands of  Edward Norton for more than 15 years. Last week, funding finally came through for the project , which is scheduled to begin filming in New York later this year. Published in 1999, "Motherless Brooklyn" is a novel about a small-time detective agency and a mobster's murder. What made it special -- it won that year's National Book Critics Circle award for fiction -- is its narrator, Lionel Essrog, and his unique voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2013
FICTION Americanah Chima manda Ngozi Adichie Knopf, $26.95 While carving her path as a writer in the U.S., an outspoken Nigerian immigrant grapples with culture clash and long-distance love. At Night We Walk in Circles Daniel Alarcón Riverhead, $27.95 In an unnamed Latin American country, an idealistic young actor joins a radical theater troupe for a touring production of an incendiary political play. The Luminaries Eleanor Catton Little, Brown, $27 Twelve townsmen gather in secret to unravel a series of strange events involving a missing notable, a suicidal prostitute and a dead drunk in this Man Booker Prize winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Writer Jonathan Lethem took some time to join us in our secret video booth at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. He gave us a preview of his next novel, "Dissident Gardens," which will be coming to bookstores in September. "It's about American leftists," he explains in the video. "Specifically, a red-diaper baby generation trying to figure out what it all means, this legacy of American Communism. " "It's set in Queens and Greenwich Village, another New York neighborhood book, very much about the life of the city....
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Sean Manning loves book covers -- so much so that he created a blog, Talking Covers , to explore the design process. On Saturday afternoon he'll be at the Last Bookstore (itself the subject of this feature ) talking about book covers with novelist Jonathan Lethem. Lethem will discuss his own book covers and will reveal the one for his forthcoming novel "Dissident Gardens," due out in the fall. Book-cover designers will make video appearances. Manning, who is author of the memoir “The Things That Need Doing” as well as a blogger, answered question via email about the event, the challenge of ebook design and his favorite designers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By J. Hoberman
A red Rose grows in Brooklyn, marries German refugee Albert (from a once-wealthy family but also a gung-ho Jewish communist like herself), and after some debate (a specialty), moves with him to the planned community of Sunnyside Gardens, Queens. There in this imagined socialist utopia, Rose Angrush Zimmer gives birth to daughter Miriam, who at the dawn of the '60s, will herself rebel. This, grossly simplified, is the tale of "Dissident Gardens," Jonathan Lethem's rich, grotesque and tender family saga, the latest, most pungent of his accounts of growing up absurd in New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The Ecstasy of Influence Nonfictions, etc. Jonathan Lethem Doubleday: 438 pp., $27.95 Like Norman Mailer's "Advertisements for Myself," Jonathan Lethem's collection of essays and occasional pieces "The Ecstasy of Influence" resists our attempts to fence it in. I mention Mailer because Lethem does, early and often; "Influence is semiconscious," he writes, four pages in, "not something to delineate too extensively, except when we've...
NEWS
February 26, 1997 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
Philip, an anthropologist, loves Alice, a physicist; but Alice no longer loves Philip. She loves Lack, instead. Lack is an experiment in futurist physics. Sitting in the laboratories of a university super-collider, it is a constructed void, a wormhole that makes all matter or energy fed into it vanish, transformed into the matter and energy of an alternate universe. That, at least, is the plan of professor Soft, the Nobel Prize-winning chief of the particle-physicist team to which Alice belongs.
BOOKS
September 29, 1996 | Charlotte Innes, Charlotte Innes is a regular contributor to the Book Review
Once, there was no genre fiction, just stories. When Homer injected gods and goddesses into ancient news events like the fall of Troy, nobody asked if it was fantasy, historical fiction or even poetry. He was just a storyteller. Today, writers who fail to fit into a category, or who straddle several genres, don't always get the recognition they deserve.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Two interesting art events have caught our eye for Thursday night - both with a high energy, pop-cultural spin. West Hollywood's Guy Hepner Gallery , which specializes in the work of Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Damien Hirst, will host an opening reception for “True Love Stories,” the debut solo show of British twins Franklyn and Brendan Connor.  Known as The Connor Brothers, the duo paints as a team - in this case, brightly colored...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By J. Hoberman
A red Rose grows in Brooklyn, marries German refugee Albert (from a once-wealthy family but also a gung-ho Jewish communist like herself), and after some debate (a specialty), moves with him to the planned community of Sunnyside Gardens, Queens. There in this imagined socialist utopia, Rose Angrush Zimmer gives birth to daughter Miriam, who at the dawn of the '60s, will herself rebel. This, grossly simplified, is the tale of "Dissident Gardens," Jonathan Lethem's rich, grotesque and tender family saga, the latest, most pungent of his accounts of growing up absurd in New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Writer Jonathan Lethem took some time to join us in our secret video booth at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. He gave us a preview of his next novel, "Dissident Gardens," which will be coming to bookstores in September. "It's about American leftists," he explains in the video. "Specifically, a red-diaper baby generation trying to figure out what it all means, this legacy of American Communism. " "It's set in Queens and Greenwich Village, another New York neighborhood book, very much about the life of the city....
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A few days before Saturday's panel about the social novel at the Festival of Books, author Marisa Silver joked with L.A. TImes book critic David Ulin: "I don't know what a social novel is, but I don't think I write them. " It ends up she just might. Ulin, Silver and authors Rachel Kushner and Jonathan Lethem hashed out the meaning of the social novel during their panel discussion  -- beginning with Wikipedia 's bare-bones definition and quickly spiraling upward into a talk a bit more suitable for a lecture hall at USC. FULL COVERAGE: FESTIVAL OF BOOKS Using Charles Dickens ("Hard Times")
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Sean Manning loves book covers -- so much so that he created a blog, Talking Covers , to explore the design process. On Saturday afternoon he'll be at the Last Bookstore (itself the subject of this feature ) talking about book covers with novelist Jonathan Lethem. Lethem will discuss his own book covers and will reveal the one for his forthcoming novel "Dissident Gardens," due out in the fall. Book-cover designers will make video appearances. Manning, who is author of the memoir “The Things That Need Doing” as well as a blogger, answered question via email about the event, the challenge of ebook design and his favorite designers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Daniel Mendelsohn is the prizewinning writer and cultural critic whose latest book, "Waiting for the Barbarians," is newly published by the New York Review of Books. Mendelsohn comes to the ALOUD series  series at the Los Angeles Central Library on Thursday, where he'll be in conversation with Jonathan Lethem. He answered our questions about his essay collection and the state of criticism today via email. The criticism in your book covers both high culture (19th century German literature)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2003 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
One might be tempted to ask Jonathan Lethem if those indeed are X-ray specs he keeps pressing close against the bridge of his nose. Perhaps that's because Lethem doesn't appear to see what a mere out-of-towner -- or, for that matter, any mere mortal -- might first take in. On this requisitely scruffy-at-the-edges (and thereby certifiably hip) stretch of Court Street, Lethem takes a sentimental afternoon stroll.
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
Philip, an anthropologist, loves Alice, a physicist; but Alice no longer loves Philip. She loves Lack, instead. Lack is an experiment in futurist physics. Sitting in the laboratories of a university super-collider, it is a constructed void, a wormhole that makes all matter or energy fed into it vanish, transformed into the matter and energy of an alternate universe. That, at least, is the plan of professor Soft, the Nobel Prize-winning chief of the particle-physicist team to which Alice belongs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Of all the books I read this year, here - alphabetically by title - are my 10 favorites, those that most stuck with me, that reframed how I think about the world. "1Q84" by Haruki Murakami (Alfred A. Knopf: 926 pp., $30.50). Murakami's magnum opus more than lives up to its billing, immersing us in a slightly altered universe to tell what is, in the end, the most traditional of stories: Boy gets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl. "Binocular Vision: New and Selected Stories" by Edith Pearlman (Lookout Books: 374 pp., $18.95 paper)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2011
BOOKS Harlan Ellison The prolific science-fiction writer, who penned memorable episodes of "The Outer Limits," "The Man From U.N.C.L.E.," "The Twilight Zone" and "Star Trek," will discuss his love-hate relationship with TV in a conversation with screenwriter Josh Olson ("A History of Violence"). A screening of select Ellison episodes will follow. The Cinefamily, 611 N. Fairfax Ave., L.A. 7:30 p.m. $10. (323) 655-2510. http://www.cinefamily.org Jonathan Lethem The prolific author is best known for his fiction, which includes the sci-fi-indebted "The Four Fingers of Death" and crime caper "Motherless Brooklyn.
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