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Jonathan Mann

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NEWS
July 31, 1987 | Associated Press
The number of AIDS cases reported worldwide has increased to 55,396 in 122 countries, the World Health Organization said Thursday. Jonathan Mann, director of the organization's AIDS program, said the latest country to begin reporting cases is Ethiopia, reporting five as of June 30. In all, nine new countries have reported AIDS cases since June 1, when the overall figure stood at about 52,000.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1998 | LESLIE BERGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Before his Sept. 2 death aboard Swissair Flight 111, the renowned epidemiologist Jonathan Mann had been juggling several new projects, including a documentary based on his acclaimed book "AIDS in the World II." His goal, according to admirers, had been to reach out from his elite world of scientists and heads of state to the general public, and more widely disseminate his conviction that the global AIDS epidemic threatened efforts to stabilize the economies of developing countries.
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NEWS
March 5, 1987 | From Reuters
Testing international travelers for AIDS is likely to be of little help in curbing the disease, and safe sex habits remain the best defense, World Health Organization experts said Wednesday. A two-day meeting of 14 medical and public health specialists from 12 countries agreed that screening travelers would involve great cost and bring only marginal benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1990
The resignation of Dr. Jonathan Mann as head of the World Health Organization's AIDS program is a serious blow to the global campaign to contain the AIDS epidemic. It inevitably raises questions about the leadership of Dr. Hiroshi Nakajima, WHO director general since 1988. Mann launched the program in 1986, building on his work in Zaire for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control on the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1990
The resignation of Dr. Jonathan Mann as head of the World Health Organization's AIDS program is a serious blow to the global campaign to contain the AIDS epidemic. It inevitably raises questions about the leadership of Dr. Hiroshi Nakajima, WHO director general since 1988. Mann launched the program in 1986, building on his work in Zaire for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control on the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1998 | LESLIE BERGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Before his Sept. 2 death aboard Swissair Flight 111, the renowned epidemiologist Jonathan Mann had been juggling several new projects, including a documentary based on his acclaimed book "AIDS in the World II." His goal, according to admirers, had been to reach out from his elite world of scientists and heads of state to the general public, and more widely disseminate his conviction that the global AIDS epidemic threatened efforts to stabilize the economies of developing countries.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The World Health Organization put its battle against AIDS under the temporary leadership of a New York City doctor after Dr. Jonathan Mann quit over differences with WHO's director general. Dr. Michael H. Merson, 44, will be acting head of the Global Program on AIDS until June 14, when Mann's resignation takes effect.
NEWS
August 15, 1987 | From Reuters
Women carrying the AIDS virus should not be put off breast-feeding their babies, for the risk of transmitting the virus in that fashion appears low, the World Health Organization said Friday, adding that the benefits of breast-feeding outweigh the risk of infection to the infant. Dr. Jonathan Mann, who heads the WHO program on AIDS, said the risk of possible transmission through breast-feeding "is very small."
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a widening dispute over AIDS policy at the World Health Organization, the second in command of the U.N. agency's AIDS program has quit to show support for the former program leader, Dr. Jonathan Mann, an agency source said in Geneva, Switzerland. Kathleen Kay, 31, an Australian who was Mann's executive assistant, has resigned, the source said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The central national radio of Switzerland has received recorded AIDS information messages for air from such diverse Europeans as French singer Charles Aznavour, English actress Jane Birkin and French Formula One driving champion Alain Prost. Three or four of the recorded warnings will be heard each day through September on the French-language Swiss radio.
NEWS
July 31, 1987 | Associated Press
The number of AIDS cases reported worldwide has increased to 55,396 in 122 countries, the World Health Organization said Thursday. Jonathan Mann, director of the organization's AIDS program, said the latest country to begin reporting cases is Ethiopia, reporting five as of June 30. In all, nine new countries have reported AIDS cases since June 1, when the overall figure stood at about 52,000.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | From Reuters
Testing international travelers for AIDS is likely to be of little help in curbing the disease, and safe sex habits remain the best defense, World Health Organization experts said Wednesday. A two-day meeting of 14 medical and public health specialists from 12 countries agreed that screening travelers would involve great cost and bring only marginal benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1986 | From Reuters
The number of victims of AIDS has grown to a total 32,590 cases in 74 countries, the World Health Organization said Friday. This represented an increase of more than 12,000 cases since last January, when overall cases reported since the beginning of the epidemic five years ago stood at 20,476. Dr.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | Associated Press
A three-day international conference to assess the social and economic impact of AIDS opened Tuesday in London with more than 1,000 delegates. On the first day, Dr. Jonathan Mann, director of the World Health Organization's AIDS program, condemned as irresponsible the suggestion by sex researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson that the disease could be passed by toilet seats and insect bites.
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