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Jonathan Mcmurtry

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1992 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The world of theater is usually crammed full of people and moments that are more perfectly realized than they ever are in life. Every actor on stage always knows the perfect bon mot. They are cleverer than anyone has a right to be and raring to pounce with the quick comeback, the profound insight and the heart-wrenching revelation. Even awkward pauses are intentional--a function of artfully placed ellipses--and pregnant with meaning.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1992 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The world of theater is usually crammed full of people and moments that are more perfectly realized than they ever are in life. Every actor on stage always knows the perfect bon mot. They are cleverer than anyone has a right to be and raring to pounce with the quick comeback, the profound insight and the heart-wrenching revelation. Even awkward pauses are intentional--a function of artfully placed ellipses--and pregnant with meaning.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1986 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
For the early portion of "As You Like It" at the South Coast Repertory, the part that takes place in the Court of Duke Frederick, we're given a dark, conspiratorial look close to Frederick's stone-cold heart. Cliff Faulkner's set has a High Renaissance aspect--black marble inlaid with gold, a setting for wealthy intrigue. The look is echoed in Shigeru Yaji's black-and-gold costumes. Together they suggest Puccini's Japan, where Madam Butterfly's heart is plunged into darkness.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1992 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After a lifetime in the theater, the routine is never routine to Jonathan McMurtry. He still works hard at every part he takes on. Studying the character. Trying to discern from the lines how he should talk and how he should walk. Struggling to pin down what his character is up to when he's not on stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1992 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After a lifetime in the theater, the routine is never routine to Jonathan McMurtry. He still works hard at every part he takes on. Studying the character. Trying to discern from the lines how he should talk and how he should walk. Struggling to pin down what his character is up to when he's not on stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1989 | JAN HERMAN
Jonathan McMurtry believes that if he and Alan Turing--the British mathematician he plays in "Breaking the Code" at South Coast Repertory--had ever met at a cocktail party, the encounter would have been unpleasant for both of them. "I wouldn't have liked him personally," McMurtry says. "I would have found him too self-centered. He was rather opinionated. And he could be very biting, especially with people who didn't understand his work. I probably would have said, . . . what's wrong with him?'
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Old Globe Theatre is beginning its summer season with an end-of-summer staging of "As You Like It." Set in the alfresco Lowell Davies Festival Theatre, this "As You Like It" is bountiful, well-spoken and without major surprises--unless it's the fact that the production's overriding melancholy is underplayed in the one character, Jaques, where it's most needed. The hints of incipient autumn are established by David Jenkins' set.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1987 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
The entropy seeping out of the Equity Waiver movement and the malaise of the larger commercial theaters have been well-enough documented not to require further mention here. But they did account for a certain grim aftertaste in looking back over a year whose pleasures, in retrospect, rested more in a few performances than in the sense of deliverance one derives from participating in a great theatrical event.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1987 | NANCY CHURNIN
"A Walk in the Woods," the recent Broadway-bound production by the La Jolla Playhouse, swept the fourth annual San Diego Critics Circle Awards on Sunday evening, taking the honors for best production, best direction (Des McAnuff), best lead actor (Michael Constantine) and best scenic design (Bill Clarke). In addition to the scheduled awards, which were given in 14 categories for productions opening in San Diego County between Sept. 15, 1986, and Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1991 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some directors let plays speak for themselves. Then there's Scott Feldsher, whose staging of "A Christmas Carol" is a self-indulgent exercise that says "Look at me!" at every turn.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1989 | JAN HERMAN
Jonathan McMurtry believes that if he and Alan Turing--the British mathematician he plays in "Breaking the Code" at South Coast Repertory--had ever met at a cocktail party, the encounter would have been unpleasant for both of them. "I wouldn't have liked him personally," McMurtry says. "I would have found him too self-centered. He was rather opinionated. And he could be very biting, especially with people who didn't understand his work. I probably would have said, . . . what's wrong with him?'
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1986 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
For the early portion of "As You Like It" at the South Coast Repertory, the part that takes place in the Court of Duke Frederick, we're given a dark, conspiratorial look close to Frederick's stone-cold heart. Cliff Faulkner's set has a High Renaissance aspect--black marble inlaid with gold, a setting for wealthy intrigue. The look is echoed in Shigeru Yaji's black-and-gold costumes. Together they suggest Puccini's Japan, where Madam Butterfly's heart is plunged into darkness.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
The music by Bob James is strong, chilling, dramatic. There's an abstract massiveness to Ralph Funicello's set, modeled on Paris' Jardin des Plantes and built at rakish angles, with walkways and high ceilings. Opulent reds and golds dominate the stage against backdrops the color of dried blood. Candelabra are everywhere. The statue of a stone angel sits dead center. And suddenly, out of the floor, more candelabra. Is this "The Phantom of the Opera"? No.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1986 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Stage Writer
There are those who might still quibble with the credibility of Lyle Kessler's "Orphans" and make points, but, in the long run, it would be an empty victory. Do you look for logic in Pinter? Kessler's play, which originated in 1983 at L.A.'s Matrix Theatre (where so many good things seem to start), is not Pinter, but it has a similar ambiance of mild anguish. Since 1983 "Orphans" has successfully journeyed to Chicago and New York.
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