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Jonathan Nossiter

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August 17, 1997 | John Clark, John Clark is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Director Jonathan Nossiter gets more excited about wines than he does about movies. He's seated in a fashionable SoHo restaurant called Balthazar, rhapsodizing about the wine list owner Keith McNally allowed him to set up. He's wearing a gap-toothed grin and a short-sleeve tropical shirt with a pin where a button should be. "This list," he says, running his eyes down the menu as if it were the Gutenberg Bible, "I started working on this list in October.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Dennis Lim
At once a punch-drunk love letter to the expressive possibilities of wine and a boozy rant against clubby wine-world politics, Jonathan Nossiter's "Mondovino" is also among the most vigorous cinematic explorations of globalization and its discontents. If formulaic fictions such as "Babel" or "Crash" harp on the paradoxical alienation of our interconnected lives, Nossiter's documentary, given its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in 2004, portrays globalization as a homogenizing force at the service of modern capitalism.
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March 16, 2005 | David Shaw, Times Staff Writer
It was a surprise hit at the Cannes Film Festival, then a box-office sensation throughout France -- both a succes d'estime (the critics loved it) and a succes de scandale (many people in the wine world hated it, and a few threatened lawsuits over it). It is "Mondovino," a documentary about the increasing globalization and homogenization of the world's wines, and while it won't open in this country until next week (in New York) and late next month in L.A.
FOOD
March 16, 2005 | David Shaw, Times Staff Writer
It was a surprise hit at the Cannes Film Festival, then a box-office sensation throughout France -- both a succes d'estime (the critics loved it) and a succes de scandale (many people in the wine world hated it, and a few threatened lawsuits over it). It is "Mondovino," a documentary about the increasing globalization and homogenization of the world's wines, and while it won't open in this country until next week (in New York) and late next month in L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jonathan Nossiter's "Signs & Wonders" has such resonance and sophistication that it recalls the cinema of Michelangelo Antonioni in its powerful evocation of the essentially enigmatic quality of human nature. Instead of the visual splendor of the Italian maestro, however, the American-born Nossiter exhibits the terse but equally cinematic style of a noir thriller.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Dennis Lim
At once a punch-drunk love letter to the expressive possibilities of wine and a boozy rant against clubby wine-world politics, Jonathan Nossiter's "Mondovino" is also among the most vigorous cinematic explorations of globalization and its discontents. If formulaic fictions such as "Babel" or "Crash" harp on the paradoxical alienation of our interconnected lives, Nossiter's documentary, given its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in 2004, portrays globalization as a homogenizing force at the service of modern capitalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
People read a lot of meaning into wine, seeing beyond the really expensive fermented grape juice and investing it with religious symbolism and intellectual properties. Wine connoisseurship is often interpreted as a status symbol, and the beverage has been intimately linked with Western civilization and other world cultures for thousands of years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1997 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
When you're a kid, September is the cruelest month. And Sunday, naturally, is the cruelest day of the week. It marks the end of freedom, the resumption of work, the cusp of hope and horror. It's time you spend the way you spend your last dollar, with all the unbridled joy of the condemned. This sentiment fades, of course, but does it ever really go away? (Think right now about last Sunday night or the melancholic, fast-approaching September.) And what is it that makes a Sunday a Sunday?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jonathan Nossiter's "Resident Alien: Quentin Crisp in America" (at the Sunset 5) offers a perceptive, thoroughly engaging and multilayered portrait of an acerbic and courageous man who once described himself as "England's stateliest homo."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1996
MOVIES Let the Games Erupt: Fanning the flames of the dueling volcano movies, Universal Pictures announced that the release date of "Dante's Peak" would be moved up from March 7 to Feb. 7. Twentieth Century Fox's "Volcano" is scheduled to surface on Feb. 28. "This comes as no surprise," said Fox senior executive vice president Tom Sherak. "They've been trying to make this happen for awhile--spending a fortune to get their special effects done."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jonathan Nossiter's "Signs & Wonders" has such resonance and sophistication that it recalls the cinema of Michelangelo Antonioni in its powerful evocation of the essentially enigmatic quality of human nature. Instead of the visual splendor of the Italian maestro, however, the American-born Nossiter exhibits the terse but equally cinematic style of a noir thriller.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1997 | John Clark, John Clark is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Director Jonathan Nossiter gets more excited about wines than he does about movies. He's seated in a fashionable SoHo restaurant called Balthazar, rhapsodizing about the wine list owner Keith McNally allowed him to set up. He's wearing a gap-toothed grin and a short-sleeve tropical shirt with a pin where a button should be. "This list," he says, running his eyes down the menu as if it were the Gutenberg Bible, "I started working on this list in October.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Ah, Cannes," the cabdriver at the Nice Airport said, worry in his voice, when he heard his passenger's destination. "The festival, is it going to be OK?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2004 | Jonathan Caouette, Special to The Times
"Tarnation," an official selection of the 2004 Cannes Director's Fortnight, a sidebar of sorts to the Cannes film festival, is Jonathan Caouette's documentary self-portrait chronicling his chaotic upbringing in a dysfunctional Texas family and the unexpected relationship that develops with his mentally ill mother, Renee. "Tarnation" was screened at the Sundance Film Festival this year, where it inspired a great deal of buzz and, eventually, a distribution deal for the 31-year-old filmmaker.
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