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Jonathan Nott

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October 16, 2005 | Michael White, Special to The Times
ORCHESTRAL life in Germany has long been dominated by what happens in Berlin, Munich and Dresden, with Cologne and Leipzig to complete the picture. But more recently another city has made a case for being considered alongside them: Bamberg, famous for its medieval waterways and great cathedral, has become increasingly well known for its resident Bamberg Symphony, which has, over the past five years, emerged as what one newspaper has called "the model for what modern orchestras should be."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2006 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
In an interesting (deliberate?) confluence of programming, the leaders of Germany's Bamberg Symphony -- the principal conductor, Jonathan Nott, and the honorary conductor, Herbert Blomstedt -- could be found at Walt Disney Concert Hall within two weeks of each other this fall. Both came to town to accompany the Los Angeles Philharmonic's "On Location" resident violinist, Joshua Bell, in the most basic repertoire imaginable, and both chose a Schubert symphony as counterweights.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2006 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
In an interesting (deliberate?) confluence of programming, the leaders of Germany's Bamberg Symphony -- the principal conductor, Jonathan Nott, and the honorary conductor, Herbert Blomstedt -- could be found at Walt Disney Concert Hall within two weeks of each other this fall. Both came to town to accompany the Los Angeles Philharmonic's "On Location" resident violinist, Joshua Bell, in the most basic repertoire imaginable, and both chose a Schubert symphony as counterweights.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2005 | Michael White, Special to The Times
ORCHESTRAL life in Germany has long been dominated by what happens in Berlin, Munich and Dresden, with Cologne and Leipzig to complete the picture. But more recently another city has made a case for being considered alongside them: Bamberg, famous for its medieval waterways and great cathedral, has become increasingly well known for its resident Bamberg Symphony, which has, over the past five years, emerged as what one newspaper has called "the model for what modern orchestras should be."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
Last summer the New York Philharmonic attempted Stockhausen's devilishly difficult “Gruppen” for three orchestras. Each orchestra has its own conductor. Music director Alan Gilbert sweated bullets conducting one. The composer Magnus Lindberg sweated bullets conducting a second one. Both demonstrated why the work is rarely performed. Only for the third orchestra did the conductor seem in his element and the music pop out with the arresting immediacy that demonstrated why "Gruppen" is a landmark of the 1950s avant garde.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2005 | Chris Pasles; Mark Swed; Richard S. Ginell; James C. Taylor
Baroque splendor exhumed Vivaldi: "Bajazet" David Daniels, countertenor. Vivica Genaux, mezzo-soprano. Ildebrando D'Arcangelo, bass-baritone. Europa Galante. Fabio Biondi, conductor. (Virgin Classics) **** This first recording of Vivaldi's 1735 opera, "Bajazet," is a welcome exhumation of a vocally dazzling work.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2005 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Ending months of speculation, conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen said Tuesday that he would lead the Los Angeles Philharmonic for at least three more years. "There's no other orchestra in the world that is doing this well in terms of gaining new ground, finding new audiences, doing a vast variety of things," Salonen said. "I thought, I have to be part of this."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2005 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Though a composer of operas and concert works, Erich Wolfgang Korngold is remembered as the emigre who romanticized Hollywood by ushering in the lush symphonic sound of 1930s films. He was also among the first composers to give the concert hall a taste of Hollywood. His Violin Concerto, finished in 1945, contains tunes from "Anthony Adverse," "Another Dawn" and other movies. Jascha Heifetz put the concerto on the map when he recorded it on a soundstage in 1953 with the Los Angeles Philharmonic.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2005 | MARK SWED
SENSATION-SEEKING premature reports of the death of a mature art, classical music, did not cease in 2005. Naysayers howled into the wind. But it was a very good year. Peter Sellars continues to make waves and move mountains. If there had been any question that Sellars is the single most creative force in the world of opera today, he took care of that in 2005.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Gyorgy Ligeti, a musical giant respected for his ability to simultaneously honor and modernize musical traditions and a cult pop figure whose work was used in the film "2001: A Space Odyssey" to evoke the mystery of outer space, died Monday in Vienna. He was 83. The composer, who began an opera with a honking "Car Horn Prelude," had been in poor health for much of his life and suffered from a combination of diseases. The cause of his death was not given.
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