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Jonathan P Niednagel

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SPORTS
August 9, 1998 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Times Staff Writer
Was Michael Jordan born to be a great pressure player? Is there something in his genetic blueprint that makes him more dependable in times of duress? Are athletes predisposed to success or failure? Can you test your 10-year-old Jimmy to see if he is cut out to be a relief pitcher? More important, does Laker phenom Kobe Bryant have what it takes between the ears to become the next Jordan? The answers, according to Jonathan P. Niednagel, are yes, yes, yes, yes and, um, no.
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SPORTS
August 9, 1998 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Times Staff Writer
Was Michael Jordan born to be a great pressure player? Is there something in his genetic blueprint that makes him more dependable in times of duress? Are athletes predisposed to success or failure? Can you test your 10-year-old Jimmy to see if he is cut out to be a relief pitcher? More important, does Laker phenom Kobe Bryant have what it takes between the ears to become the next Jordan? The answers, according to Jonathan P. Niednagel, are yes, yes, yes, yes and, um, no.
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SPORTS
August 9, 1998 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
Did the Clippers blow it again? Jonathan P. Niednagel, who identifies brain types for a living, says the long-bungling franchise did not get the "next" Hakeem Olajuwon with its No. 1 selection of Pacific center Michael Olowokandi in June's NBA draft. Olowokandi's brain type differs from Olajuwon's, which is the NBA's premier type, the same as Michael Jordan's.
SPORTS
August 9, 1998 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
Did the Clippers blow it again? Jonathan P. Niednagel, who identifies brain types for a living, says the long-bungling franchise did not get the "next" Hakeem Olajuwon with its No. 1 selection of Pacific center Michael Olowokandi in June's NBA draft. Olowokandi's brain type differs from Olajuwon's, which is the NBA's premier type, the same as Michael Jordan's.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | JOHN WEYLER
Jonathan P. Niednagel is carving out a niche for himself in sports psychology by combining the work of Swiss psychologist and psychiatrist Carl Jung with the latest neuroscience. His theories about the connection between personality types, or "brain types" as he calls them, and control of certain muscle groups has drawn the attention of professional franchises in nearly every sport.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Norm Haden met Jonathan P. Niednagel in 1985, when they were paired as first-year Little League coaches. Haden was a rookie, but he understood enough about the dynamics of Little League to know his new team would take its lumps. When he and Niednagel prepared to select players, however, he got a really bad feeling.
SPORTS
August 15, 1998
After reading the series of articles in the Sunday Times [Aug. 9] about athletes and brain types, I could not figure out what it was that I found the most disturbing. Was it that The Times devoted the better part of four pages to a technique that has not apparently been researched by anyone in the scientific community? Maybe it was reading the praise bestowed on these techniques by basketball coaches--guys I would talk to if I wanted to improve my jump shot, but not exactly my first choice when it comes to understanding the nature of the human condition.
SPORTS
March 12, 2001 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
The Brain Doctor made a house call. He phoned mine last week from the Ozarks, where he now lives and works. The subject was Ryan Leaf. In 1998, Jonathan P. Niednagel's research formed the blueprint for a story we did on brain typing in sports. Niednagel is not really a doctor, he doesn't even play one on TV, but several professional sports franchises have enlisted his services to help dissect the minds of their athletes.
SPORTS
March 5, 2001 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
A hard look at the news through the lens of an XFL-cam. News item: XFL announces plans to allow teenagers to play in league. Second thought: This may appear a bit harsh, but it actually fits in nicely with the league's new "Tackle Your Toddler" program. News item: XFL ratings drop for a fourth consecutive week. Second thought: Instead of the national anthem, next weekend's games should open with "Taps." Is it too early to project which XFL games will end up on ESPN Classic?
SPORTS
August 11, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
There's no question that Jeff Juden, who makes his first start for the Angels tonight in Detroit, is a character. But I'm not sure he's a Disney character. I mean, here's a guy who once missed a start because of an infected tattoo. Jim Fregosi, who as Philadelphia's manager in 1995 demoted Juden from his starting rotation, often has been quoted as calling him "the most unprofessional player I've ever seen." That quote, however, has been under-reported.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Norm Haden met Jonathan P. Niednagel in 1985, when they were paired as first-year Little League coaches. Haden was a rookie, but he understood enough about the dynamics of Little League to know his new team would take its lumps. When he and Niednagel prepared to select players, however, he got a really bad feeling.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | JOHN WEYLER
Jonathan P. Niednagel is carving out a niche for himself in sports psychology by combining the work of Swiss psychologist and psychiatrist Carl Jung with the latest neuroscience. His theories about the connection between personality types, or "brain types" as he calls them, and control of certain muscle groups has drawn the attention of professional franchises in nearly every sport.
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