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Jonathan Pollard

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1998
This is in response to the Nov. 5 letter written by Yury Gurvich. He's gotten the issue all wrong. In Jonathan Pollard's case, he gave information to a friend and ally (Israel) to protect it against the weapon preparations of Iraq, Iran and Syria, which are all known to be advocates of Israel's destruction. Pollard broke the law and should have been punished. The miscarriage of justice here is that his punishment did not fit the crime. After 13 years, the time is past due for his release.
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WORLD
April 4, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State John F. Kerry signaled Friday that he may scale back his intense effort to broker an Israeli-Palestinian peace in view of the two sides' “unhelpful actions” in recent days. With the parties at an impasse, Kerry said it was “reality-check time” because "there are limits to the amount of time and effort that the United States can spend if the parties themselves are unwilling to take constructive steps in order to be able to move forward.” Though neither side has called off the talks, “we are not going to sit there indefinitely,” Kerry said during a news conference in Morocco, where he stopped at the end of a weeklong trip to the Middle East and Europe.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1993
In response to "Jonathan Pollard: Has the Punishment Come to Outweigh the Crime?" Commentary, Jan. 18: As Anne Pollard's father, I have little regard for either Rabbi Avraham Weiss or the team of Norman Polmar and Thomas B. Allen. Similarly, I wish my daughter had chosen her husband better. Polmar and Allen continue to peddle the Weinberger story that Jonathan Pollard was the most damaging agent in U.S. history and therefore deserved his sentence of life without parole in solitary confinement.
WORLD
March 31, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Secretary of State John F. Kerry arrived in Jerusalem on Monday evening to begin talks with Israeli and Palestinian leaders in a bid to keep the troubled peace negotiations on track. The immediate obstacle Kerry seeks to overcome is a deadlock over Israel's delay in freeing about two dozen Palestinian prisoners to complete its promise last year to release 104 people jailed for crimes predating the 1990s Oslo peace accords. Palestinian officials expected the final release to be completed by the end of March, but by Monday night Israel had yet to set in motion the process, which usually takes 48 hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1993 | LEONARD GARMENT, Leonard Garment is an attorney in Washington. He was a White House counsel to Richard Nixon. and
I was involved in the early stages of the Jonathan Pollard case as counsel for an Israeli Air Force officer implicated in the affair. I withdrew for reasons that are not related to this article; they involved disagreements with Israeli counsel about negotiations for a disposition of the officer's case with the U.S. Justice Department. I believed then, as I do now, that Pollard committed a grave wrong and deserved appropriate punishment.
NEWS
July 19, 1990 | From United Press International
Jonathan Pollard, the former Navy intelligence specialist imprisoned for life for spying for Israel, has filed for divorce from his wife, who served three years in prison as an accessory to his crimes, her lawyer said today. Mark Baker, attorney for Anne Henderson Pollard, 30, said his client was served with divorce papers in her bed at Mount Sinai Hospital on Wednesday by a man who posed as a hospital employee to gain entry to her room.
OPINION
October 23, 2010
There may be good reasons for granting clemency to Jonathan Pollard, the former Navy intelligence analyst who was sentenced to life in prison in 1987 for providing U.S. military documents to Israel. But Pollard's usefulness as a diplomatic bargaining chip isn't one of them. Four Democrats in Congress are circulating a letter urging President Obama to release Pollard as a way of encouraging Israel to make "difficult decisions" in the peace process with the Palestinians. Such an arrangement was suggested during recent talks about how the United States might persuade Israel to extend a freeze on the construction of Jewish settlements in the West Bank.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1993 | AVRAHAM WEISS, Avraham (Avi) Weiss is rabbi of the Hebrew Institute of Riverdale, N.Y., and national president of Amcha: The Coalition for Jewish Concerns.
I remember clearly my travels with Avital Sharansky as we worked for her husband Natan's release. I can still recall how deeply pained we and all people were, how angry we all felt at the injustice of his incarceration in the Soviet Union. Today, I act as Jonathan Pollard's rabbi, devoting countless hours working for his release. Again I feel the pain, again I feel the anger. To be sure, there is a major difference between the cases. Pollard, unlike Sharansky, is not innocent.
OPINION
December 3, 1995 | ALAN DERSHOWITZ, Alan M. Dershowitz is a professor of law at Harvard University. His most recent books are "The Advocate's Devil" (Warner Books) and "The Abuse Excuse" (Little, Brown & Company)
As Israeli society grows farther apart in the aftermath of the Rabin assassination and the subsequent recriminations, President Clinton is in a unique position to give a healing Hanukkah gift to Israel in memory of its fallen leader. Among the few remaining issues that continue to unite Israelis of all political and religious stripes is the call for Jonathan Pollard's release. The late Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin implored Clinton to commute Pollard's sentence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1993 | NORMAN POLMAR and THOMAS B. ALLEN, Norman Polmar and Thomas B. Allen are co-authors of six books, including "Merchants of Treason" (Random House). They are working on an "encyclopedia of espionage" to be published next year.
The inauguration of President Clinton is expected to be quickly followed by a request from the Israeli government--probably through diplomacy's "back channels"--to release American spy Jonathan Jay Pollard to Israeli custody. Pollard spied against the United States, giving thousands of classified, highly sensitive documents to a foreign country.
OPINION
October 30, 2013
Re "Europe seeks a meeting on spying," Oct. 26 The U.S. does not deny having spied on leaders of its closest allies. There seems to be no public uproar at this fiasco that directly damages U.S. interests, nor does there seems to be a presidential intent of dismissing the heads of the agencies responsible for such a breach of trust. On the contrary, officialdom appears rather smug, projecting the aura that they should have gotten away with it. Now that the U.S. has been exposed snooping on trusted partners, perhaps the president should grant clemency to Jonathan Pollard, convicted of transmitting to Israel U.S. intelligence.
OPINION
February 11, 2011 | By Frank Anderson
In January, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu sent a letter to President Obama asking for the early release of Jonathan Jay Pollard, who was convicted of spying for Israel and sentenced to life in prison in 1987. The United States has steadfastly refused? requests for Pollard's release; it has every reason to continue that policy. The Pollard clemency pleas are partly based on the close relationship between Israel and the United States. Under this theory, spying for Israel was not serious because it was on behalf of an ally and a friendly government, rather than an enemy of America.
OPINION
October 28, 2010 | By Lawrence Korb
About 25 years ago, Jonathan Jay Pollard, a U.S. naval intelligence analyst, betrayed his country by providing highly classified information to Israel. Even though Israel was and still is a U.S. ally and is routinely supplied with U.S. intelligence, Pollard deserved to be severely punished for his actions. However, the punishment should fit the crime. In his case, it does not. After his arrest and indictment by a grand jury, Pollard agreed to plead guilty to one count of giving classified information to a U.S. ally.
OPINION
October 23, 2010
There may be good reasons for granting clemency to Jonathan Pollard, the former Navy intelligence analyst who was sentenced to life in prison in 1987 for providing U.S. military documents to Israel. But Pollard's usefulness as a diplomatic bargaining chip isn't one of them. Four Democrats in Congress are circulating a letter urging President Obama to release Pollard as a way of encouraging Israel to make "difficult decisions" in the peace process with the Palestinians. Such an arrangement was suggested during recent talks about how the United States might persuade Israel to extend a freeze on the construction of Jewish settlements in the West Bank.
WORLD
October 21, 2010 | By Vita Bekker, Los Angeles Times
As convicted spy Jonathan Pollard approaches 25 years behind bars, Israelis and others are renewing efforts to secure freedom for the former U.S. Navy intelligence analyst, who is serving a life sentence for relaying military documents to Israel. Pollard's case has been a source of constant friction between Israel and the United States, its staunchest ally. Israeli leaders have failed to persuade Washington to release the 56-year-old American Jew, whom Israelis and some U.S. officials say was given an unduly long sentence for spying for a friendly government.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2008 | Richard B. Schmitt and Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writers
Federal authorities arrested an 84-year-old former Army engineer Tuesday on charges of passing American military secrets to an Israeli agent in the 1980s, accusations that suggest that one of the most famous spy cases in U.S. history may have been more widespread than previously known. Ben-ami Kadish, a U.S.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2003 | From Reuters
A federal judge Thursday rejected a request by Jonathan Pollard, a civilian U.S. naval intelligence officer who admitted spying for Israel, to reopen his case and reconsider his 1987 sentence of life in prison. U.S. District Chief Judge Thomas Hogan said a different judge had been correct in 2001 in turning down Pollard's request for resentencing. Pollard, 49, is serving the life sentence at a federal prison in North Carolina.
OPINION
September 19, 2003 | Milton Viorst, Milton Viorst has covered the Middle East for more than three decades. His most recent book is "What Shall I Do With This People? Jews and the Fractious Politics of Judaism" (Free Press, 2002).
Jonathan Pollard, who pleaded guilty to spying for Israel, caught a glimpse of freedom this month for the first time since he entered a federal prison in 1987 to begin serving a life term. On the order of U.S. District Judge Thomas Hogan, Pollard was taken to Washington, where he heard his lawyers argue that his sentence was an injustice. The courtroom was filled with Pollard's supporters.
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