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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2009
I was fascinated by the review of Jonathan Safran Foer's book "Eating Animals" ["What's Wrong With How We Eat," Nov. 8]. As a Holocaust survivor myself, I have been unable to countenance the eating of animals since the war and often reflect on the parallels between the Germans and Poles ignoring the reality of extermination camps in their midst and our own blissful ignorance of the animal Treblinkas in our communities. As Susan Salter Reynolds points out, the forthcoming Thanksgiving observance offers an uncommon opportunity to take a personal stand against our collective cognitive dissonance about the animals we call family and the animals we call food.
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NEWS
May 30, 2002 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jonathan Safran Foer the author of the white-hot new novel "Everything Is Illuminated" (Houghton Mifflin) and Jonathan Safran Foer the protagonist in the white-hot new novel "Everything Is Illuminated" share only one salient similarity besides name and age. They both traveled to the Ukraine with a photograph of a mystery woman, young and luminous, a woman said to have saved their grandfather from the Nazis during World War II. Here their narratives diverge.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
Eating Animals Jonathan Safran Foer Little, Brown: 340 pp., $25.99 Looking forward to your turkey dinner? Think twice. It's time, argues Jonathan Safran Foer, to stop lying to ourselves. With all the studies on animal agriculture, pollution, toxic chemicals in factory-farmed animals and exposés of the appalling cruelty to animals in that industry, he writes in "Eating Animals," "We can't plead ignorance, only indifference. Those alive today are the generations that came to know better.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
Eating Animals Jonathan Safran Foer Little, Brown: 340 pp., $25.99 Looking forward to your turkey dinner? Think twice. It's time, argues Jonathan Safran Foer, to stop lying to ourselves. With all the studies on animal agriculture, pollution, toxic chemicals in factory-farmed animals and exposés of the appalling cruelty to animals in that industry, he writes in "Eating Animals," "We can't plead ignorance, only indifference. Those alive today are the generations that came to know better.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2009
I was fascinated by the review of Jonathan Safran Foer's book "Eating Animals" ["What's Wrong With How We Eat," Nov. 8]. As a Holocaust survivor myself, I have been unable to countenance the eating of animals since the war and often reflect on the parallels between the Germans and Poles ignoring the reality of extermination camps in their midst and our own blissful ignorance of the animal Treblinkas in our communities. As Susan Salter Reynolds points out, the forthcoming Thanksgiving observance offers an uncommon opportunity to take a personal stand against our collective cognitive dissonance about the animals we call family and the animals we call food.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2005 | Scott Timberg
Jonathan Safran Foer, the young novelist whose latest book is the critically acclaimed "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," was in his basement a few years ago when his phone rang and a voice with a heavy German accent came on the line.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Elijah Wood has eyes like klieg lights, and to look at them directly for too long is to fear for your corneas, and to wonder what exactly is going on in that sizable but delicately featured head of his. For orbs so distinctive, they are oddly blank and mesmerizing. You half expect his irises to start swirling if you fix on them for too long. In Liev Schreiber's "Everything Is Illuminated," Wood's eyes seem to take in everything and reveal nothing. Which may have been the idea.
BOOKS
April 3, 2005 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder, a former book critic for The Times, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1987.
There is a formidable, terrifying architecture to this first big novel dealing with the shattering reverberations of spirit set off by the destruction of the World Trade Center. Staring at horror, like staring at the sun, requires a measure of defensive averting, a smoked-glass protection of the sight. Jonathan Safran Foer, a celebrated young novelist for "Everything Is Illuminated," provides in this already acclaimed second novel a protagonist hopelessly open-eyed and entirely unshielded.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2005 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
On a Friday afternoon in West Los Angeles, the Wildwood School is abuzz. The excitement, though, is not about the upcoming weekend but rather a small, thin figure who stands behind a podium in the school's auditorium, waiting for it to fill.
BOOKS
December 18, 2005 | Denise Hamilton, Denise Hamilton is the author of the Eve Diamond mystery series, including "Last Lullaby," "Savage Garden" and the forthcoming "Prisoner of Memory."
THERE is much to admire in McSweeney's new anthology for young adults, but unfortunately, it's not always the stories themselves. The 11 tales in "Noisy Outlaws," including one graphic story aimed squarely at the Pokemon crowd, are stretched over a little more than 200 pages, with many illustrations.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Elijah Wood has eyes like klieg lights, and to look at them directly for too long is to fear for your corneas, and to wonder what exactly is going on in that sizable but delicately featured head of his. For orbs so distinctive, they are oddly blank and mesmerizing. You half expect his irises to start swirling if you fix on them for too long. In Liev Schreiber's "Everything Is Illuminated," Wood's eyes seem to take in everything and reveal nothing. Which may have been the idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2005 | Scott Timberg
Jonathan Safran Foer, the young novelist whose latest book is the critically acclaimed "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," was in his basement a few years ago when his phone rang and a voice with a heavy German accent came on the line.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2005 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
On a Friday afternoon in West Los Angeles, the Wildwood School is abuzz. The excitement, though, is not about the upcoming weekend but rather a small, thin figure who stands behind a podium in the school's auditorium, waiting for it to fill.
BOOKS
April 3, 2005 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder, a former book critic for The Times, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1987.
There is a formidable, terrifying architecture to this first big novel dealing with the shattering reverberations of spirit set off by the destruction of the World Trade Center. Staring at horror, like staring at the sun, requires a measure of defensive averting, a smoked-glass protection of the sight. Jonathan Safran Foer, a celebrated young novelist for "Everything Is Illuminated," provides in this already acclaimed second novel a protagonist hopelessly open-eyed and entirely unshielded.
BOOKS
September 26, 2004 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is the author of "The Myth of Solid Ground: Earthquakes, Prediction, and the Faultline Between Reason and Faith" and the editor of "Another City: Writing From Los Angeles" and "Writing Los Angeles: A Literary Anthology."
Samuel JOHNSON'S "Dictionary of the English Language" essentially spawned the form. It's not that there were no dictionaries prior to Johnson's; dozens had appeared in the 150 years before his book was published in 1755. What these proto-lexicons lacked, however, was an appreciation of the nuances of language, the way words and usage evolve through the refining filter of daily speech.
BOOKS
December 18, 2005 | Denise Hamilton, Denise Hamilton is the author of the Eve Diamond mystery series, including "Last Lullaby," "Savage Garden" and the forthcoming "Prisoner of Memory."
THERE is much to admire in McSweeney's new anthology for young adults, but unfortunately, it's not always the stories themselves. The 11 tales in "Noisy Outlaws," including one graphic story aimed squarely at the Pokemon crowd, are stretched over a little more than 200 pages, with many illustrations.
BOOKS
September 26, 2004 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is the author of "The Myth of Solid Ground: Earthquakes, Prediction, and the Faultline Between Reason and Faith" and the editor of "Another City: Writing From Los Angeles" and "Writing Los Angeles: A Literary Anthology."
Samuel JOHNSON'S "Dictionary of the English Language" essentially spawned the form. It's not that there were no dictionaries prior to Johnson's; dozens had appeared in the 150 years before his book was published in 1755. What these proto-lexicons lacked, however, was an appreciation of the nuances of language, the way words and usage evolve through the refining filter of daily speech.
NEWS
May 30, 2002 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jonathan Safran Foer the author of the white-hot new novel "Everything Is Illuminated" (Houghton Mifflin) and Jonathan Safran Foer the protagonist in the white-hot new novel "Everything Is Illuminated" share only one salient similarity besides name and age. They both traveled to the Ukraine with a photograph of a mystery woman, young and luminous, a woman said to have saved their grandfather from the Nazis during World War II. Here their narratives diverge.
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