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Jonathan Schell

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jonathan Schell, the author, journalist and activist who wrote passionately and cogently about war and politics for more than 40 years, condemning conflicts from Vietnam to Iraq and galvanizing the anti-nuclear movement with his horrifyingly detailed bestseller, "The Fate of the Earth," died Tuesday at his home in New York City. He was 70. The cause was cancer, according to Schell's companion, Irena Gross. With unrelenting rage and idealism, Schell focused on the consequences of violence in essays and books that conveyed a hatred of war rooted in part in his firsthand observations of American military operations in Vietnam.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jonathan Schell, the author, journalist and activist who wrote passionately and cogently about war and politics for more than 40 years, condemning conflicts from Vietnam to Iraq and galvanizing the anti-nuclear movement with his horrifyingly detailed bestseller, "The Fate of the Earth," died Tuesday at his home in New York City. He was 70. The cause was cancer, according to Schell's companion, Irena Gross. With unrelenting rage and idealism, Schell focused on the consequences of violence in essays and books that conveyed a hatred of war rooted in part in his firsthand observations of American military operations in Vietnam.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The threat of a nuclear arms race between India and Pakistan may reignite a political movement to eliminate nuclear weapons from the globe, a leading author told a Pasadena church audience Sunday. Jonathan Schell, who has written two books examining the origin and danger posed by nuclear arms, said the recent atomic weapons tests in South Asia come as a "sharp slap" that a nuclear threat cannot be ignored.
BOOKS
June 1, 2003 | Jaroslaw Anders, Jaroslaw Anders is a writer and translator living in Washington, D.C., who often writes about Eastern and Central Europe.
The 21st century is not starting well: terrorism of an unprecedented brutality and scale, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, trillions of dollars poured into high-tech armaments, old conflicts festering and new ones springing up in the most unusual places, failed states run by contending warlords, crumbling international institutions and sudden animosities breaking up old allies. The dream of post-totalitarian, post-Cold War harmony has long faded away.
BOOKS
August 20, 1989
Russell Jacoby skipped a bit breezily over some weighty arguments in the nuclear books he reviewed (Book Review, July 2), and in the process he contradicted himself. If Jeff Smith's "Unthinking the Unthinkable" critiques Jonathan Schell, for instance--and Jacoby never says the critique is wrong--how could it be taking on "straw men"? Schell has had massive influence in anti-nuclear circles, and an anti-nuclear book that points out his naivete would seem to be boldly risking the loss of its principal audience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1998
The recent overt "nuclearism" by India and what is to surely follow by Pakistan illustrates the bankrupt Cold War concept of nonproliferation, as defined by the major nuclear powers. The inability of the United States to ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty while it attempts to dictate terms to a nation of 1 billion people speaks for itself. No, what is needed is a new way of thinking for the 21st century. Jonathan Schell's monograph (Nation, February 1998, "The Gift of Time")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1991 | JONATHAN SCHELL, Jonathan Schell, a columnist for Newsday, is the author of "The Fate of the Earth," (Knopf) and "Observing the Nixon Years" (Random House)
The negotiations to create a free-trade zone encompassing the United States, Canada and Mexico, which Congress has voted to place on a "fast track," have given rise to an interesting debate. Many business groups favor the zone. They gaze longingly over the border at cheap Mexican labor and itch to set up manufacturing plants there. For just this reason, many American labor unions oppose the zone.
BOOKS
August 9, 1998 | LAWRENCE FREEDMAN, Lawrence Freedman is the author of "The Evolution of Nuclear Strategy."
"Bertie in particular sustained simultaneously a pair of opinions ludicrously incompatible," observed John Maynard Keynes of Bertrand Russell. "He held that in fact human affairs were carried on after a most irrational fashion, but that the remedy was quite simple and easy since all we had to do was carry them on rationally. A discussion of practical affairs on these lines was really very boring."
BOOKS
June 1, 2003 | Jaroslaw Anders, Jaroslaw Anders is a writer and translator living in Washington, D.C., who often writes about Eastern and Central Europe.
The 21st century is not starting well: terrorism of an unprecedented brutality and scale, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, trillions of dollars poured into high-tech armaments, old conflicts festering and new ones springing up in the most unusual places, failed states run by contending warlords, crumbling international institutions and sudden animosities breaking up old allies. The dream of post-totalitarian, post-Cold War harmony has long faded away.
BOOKS
November 9, 1986 | Martin E. Malia, Malia, professor of Russian history and of modern European intellectual history, UC Berkeley, is author of "Alexander Herzen and the Birth of Russian Socialism" and other works.
At the time of the 1772 partition of Poland, Rousseau advised its victims that if they could not avoid being swallowed by Russia and Germany, they should at least make themselves "indigestible." This is exactly what the Poles have accomplished, through all vicissitudes, down to Solidarity . . . and beyond. The two books under review go far to telling us why. "A World Apart" is a classic of the postwar emigration.
BOOKS
August 9, 1998 | LAWRENCE FREEDMAN, Lawrence Freedman is the author of "The Evolution of Nuclear Strategy."
"Bertie in particular sustained simultaneously a pair of opinions ludicrously incompatible," observed John Maynard Keynes of Bertrand Russell. "He held that in fact human affairs were carried on after a most irrational fashion, but that the remedy was quite simple and easy since all we had to do was carry them on rationally. A discussion of practical affairs on these lines was really very boring."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The threat of a nuclear arms race between India and Pakistan may reignite a political movement to eliminate nuclear weapons from the globe, a leading author told a Pasadena church audience Sunday. Jonathan Schell, who has written two books examining the origin and danger posed by nuclear arms, said the recent atomic weapons tests in South Asia come as a "sharp slap" that a nuclear threat cannot be ignored.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1998
The recent overt "nuclearism" by India and what is to surely follow by Pakistan illustrates the bankrupt Cold War concept of nonproliferation, as defined by the major nuclear powers. The inability of the United States to ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty while it attempts to dictate terms to a nation of 1 billion people speaks for itself. No, what is needed is a new way of thinking for the 21st century. Jonathan Schell's monograph (Nation, February 1998, "The Gift of Time")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1991 | JONATHAN SCHELL, Jonathan Schell, a columnist for Newsday, is the author of "The Fate of the Earth," (Knopf) and "Observing the Nixon Years" (Random House)
The negotiations to create a free-trade zone encompassing the United States, Canada and Mexico, which Congress has voted to place on a "fast track," have given rise to an interesting debate. Many business groups favor the zone. They gaze longingly over the border at cheap Mexican labor and itch to set up manufacturing plants there. For just this reason, many American labor unions oppose the zone.
BOOKS
August 20, 1989
Russell Jacoby skipped a bit breezily over some weighty arguments in the nuclear books he reviewed (Book Review, July 2), and in the process he contradicted himself. If Jeff Smith's "Unthinking the Unthinkable" critiques Jonathan Schell, for instance--and Jacoby never says the critique is wrong--how could it be taking on "straw men"? Schell has had massive influence in anti-nuclear circles, and an anti-nuclear book that points out his naivete would seem to be boldly risking the loss of its principal audience.
BOOKS
November 9, 1986 | Martin E. Malia, Malia, professor of Russian history and of modern European intellectual history, UC Berkeley, is author of "Alexander Herzen and the Birth of Russian Socialism" and other works.
At the time of the 1772 partition of Poland, Rousseau advised its victims that if they could not avoid being swallowed by Russia and Germany, they should at least make themselves "indigestible." This is exactly what the Poles have accomplished, through all vicissitudes, down to Solidarity . . . and beyond. The two books under review go far to telling us why. "A World Apart" is a classic of the postwar emigration.
OPINION
January 14, 2007 | JONATHAN CHAIT, jchait@latimescolumnists.com
I DON'T WANT to accuse American doves of rooting for the United States to lose in Iraq because I know they love their country and understand the dire consequences of defeat. But the urge to gloat is powerful, and some of them do seem to be having a grand time in the wake of being vindicated. Radar magazine recently published an article bemoaning the fact that pro-war liberal pundits have not been drummed out of the profession for their error.
NEWS
January 22, 1998 | PAUL D. COLFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not one of the giant magazines, at least not yet, nor is it known for breaking news or snagging the big interview. But as the invited guest in the fabulous homes of major stars, InStyle has managed to parlay access and unfailingly flattering portraits of the famous into one of the most striking successes in publishing today. In the January "What's Hot" issue, InStyle was "At Home With Mariel Hemingway in Sun Valley [and] Randy Quaid in Beverly Hills."
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