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Jonathan Seybold

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June 1, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Name: Jonathan Seybold Age: 51 Education: Bachelor's from Oberlin College; graduate work in economics at Yale University Title: Founder of Seybold Seminars, publisher of the Seybold Reports Family: Seybold and his wife, Patricia, were high school sweethearts. They have two daughters. Interests: Ocean kayaking, hiking, telecommuting from his homes in Malibu and Santa Fe, N.M.
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BUSINESS
June 1, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Name: Jonathan Seybold Age: 51 Education: Bachelor's from Oberlin College; graduate work in economics at Yale University Title: Founder of Seybold Seminars, publisher of the Seybold Reports Family: Seybold and his wife, Patricia, were high school sweethearts. They have two daughters. Interests: Ocean kayaking, hiking, telecommuting from his homes in Malibu and Santa Fe, N.M.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1990 | From Associated Press
Apple Computer Inc. announced Wednesday that it will lay off 3% of its work force as it struggles with rising customer dissatisfaction and sagging profit. "Apple is now paying the price for decisions it made several years ago when it elected to go for short-term profit gain rather than taking advantage of its leading position to go for greater market share," said Jonathan Seybold, publisher of Los Angeles-based Seybold Report on Desktop Publishing. John A.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1990 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pacific Data Products, a San Diego manufacturer of accessories for laser printers whose sales have skyrocketed in the last year, filed a registration statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday for an initial stock offering to raise $17.6 million to $20.9 million. A total of 3.2 million shares priced between $8 and $9.50 each will be offered for sale. Of the total, 2.2 million shares will be sold by the company and 1 million shares by existing shareholders.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meeting with leaders of Los Angeles' fledgling new-media industry, Mayor Richard Riordan on Thursday suggested the city raise $10 million to build an "incubator" site to nurture an industry that could potentially be a cornerstone of the city's economy. And the three dozen representatives from local entertainment, computer and telecommunications companies who were gathered for breakfast at USC agreed unanimously: It was a good idea.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nintendo Ltd. apparently made a rare strategic error last year when it agreed to work with Sony Corp. in developing a new generation of video game technology. The company is now looking to an alliance with Philips Consumer Electronics Co. to help undo the damage. Such a realization explains a sequence of seemingly contradictory announcements that emerged Friday and Saturday as the consumer electronics industry gathered for its biannual show in Chicago. The story began Friday when Sony Corp.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1995 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last year, three Baby Bell telephone companies linked up with Michael Ovitz to learn the ways of Hollywood. And on Monday, they may have learned their biggest lesson yet--though it wasn't exactly the one they had in mind. It was Ovitz who persuaded Pacific Telesis, Nynex and Bell Atlantic that they needed to work together to develop the next generation of television. It was Ovitz who personally recruited their high-profile chief executive, former CBS President Howard Stringer.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
International Business Machines scored a public relations victory Tuesday by becoming the first company to announce a personal computer containing the next-generation microchip from Intel Corp. The computer will not be entirely new, and it will not be available until the end of the year, but analysts saw it as a psychological victory for IBM, which has been upstaged repeatedly by its rival, Compaq Computer. "Compaq must really have bugged them. They have gotten tired of Compaq beating them to the market with the latest chip or the fastest chip," said Jonathan Seybold, publisher of Seybold Reports in Malibu.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1987 | Richard O'Reilly, Richard O'Reilly designs microcomputer applications for The Times
Apple's Macintosh was everywhere at the Seybold Conference on Desktop Publishing in Santa Clara, Calif. Desktop publishing is the term given to using a personal computer with, usually, a laser printer, to produce pages that combine various kinds of type styles, pictures and even photographs. The result is a look that otherwise would take a professional print shop to produce. (You can print such pages with a dot matrix printer too, but the quality suffers noticeably.
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