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Jonathan Swift

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Jonathan Swift probably never dreamed of the consumer excess that would elbow its way into the great satire of "Gulliver's Travels" all these centuries later. No doubt he'd have been keen on poking fun at this new world ? Swift had a fascination with human failings of the most base sort ? but I don't think a three-story Coke can that's washed up on the shores of Lilliput with all the other debris in the latest film adaptation is what he'd have in mind. Other than product placement opportunities, that debris would primarily be Jack Black, who stars as a travel writer on assignment in the Bermuda Triangle, shipwrecked by a storm, then trussed up and tied down by tiny folk like all the Gullivers before him. With director Rob Letterman ("Shark Tale" and "Monsters vs. Aliens")
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Jonathan Swift probably never dreamed of the consumer excess that would elbow its way into the great satire of "Gulliver's Travels" all these centuries later. No doubt he'd have been keen on poking fun at this new world ? Swift had a fascination with human failings of the most base sort ? but I don't think a three-story Coke can that's washed up on the shores of Lilliput with all the other debris in the latest film adaptation is what he'd have in mind. Other than product placement opportunities, that debris would primarily be Jack Black, who stars as a travel writer on assignment in the Bermuda Triangle, shipwrecked by a storm, then trussed up and tied down by tiny folk like all the Gullivers before him. With director Rob Letterman ("Shark Tale" and "Monsters vs. Aliens")
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1993
Jonathan Swift sought to shame his fellow countrymen into correcting the egregious ills of the 18th Century in his famous satire, "A Modest Proposal." Swift's diabolical plan to eliminate starvation, overpopulation and unemployment was simple, rational and entirely cost effective: Let's eat our children. After having read Lamm's essay, it no longer seems surprising to me that some people took the entirely tongue-in-cheek Swift seriously. According to Lamm, old people aren't cost-effective.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010 | By David Gritten, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Fifty yards from the main set of "Gulliver's Travels," in which he plays the title role, Jack Black is sprawling on a chair outside his large trailer, having assumed a facial expression familiar to those who know his big-screen work. With his trademark manic stare and one eyebrow raised sky high, he looks both bewildered and amazed. But right now, Black isn't playing for laughs. He's trying to explain to a visitor the camera technology that allows him to play a hero who is a giant among tiny men and women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1994
Rep. Bill Archer (R-Tex.) suggests placing children of the indigent in foster care (Nov. 11). Doesn't he realize that this would merely shift the taxpayer "burden" of caring for these children from one government agency to another? I suggest that he and his fellow Republicans take a serious look at "A Modest Proposal" satirically offered by Jonathan Swift in the 18th Century--leave the poor out in the cold to starve and sell their young children to the wealthy as a source of food.
NEWS
March 9, 1987 | Jack Smith
As I noted here the other day, the famous journalist Ambrose Bierce, in his little book "Write It Right," urged against the use of the word bug : " Bug for beetle , or for anything. Do not use it." I observed that perhaps Bierce had never heard of the following charming verse: Little bugs have littler bugs Upon their backs to bite 'em, And littler bugs have littler bugs And on ad infinitum.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1991 | GRAHAM HEATHCOTE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The story goes that any 18th-Century worshiper who snored during the sermon at St. Patrick's Cathedral here was in peril of waking to find Jonathan Swift looming above him in his pulpit. It's a legend worthy of the author of "Gulliver's Travels," and may well be true. The pulpit, mounted on wheels, is still in the cathedral. So is Swift. Swift is buried beneath the floor near the southwest porch, where everyone goes in and out, many of them drawn to Swift.
NEWS
February 4, 1996 | NANCY MILLS, Nancy Mills is a free-lance writer based in Los Angeles
His tangled brown hair hanging past his shoulders and his clothes mussed and dirty, Ted Danson is hiding in an English stable. He has a crazed look in his eyes, no doubt put there by the eight strange years that his character, shipwrecked doctor Lemuel Gulliver, has spent in Lilliput, Brobdingnag, Laputa, and the land of the Houyhnhnms and Yahoos.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010 | By David Gritten, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Fifty yards from the main set of "Gulliver's Travels," in which he plays the title role, Jack Black is sprawling on a chair outside his large trailer, having assumed a facial expression familiar to those who know his big-screen work. With his trademark manic stare and one eyebrow raised sky high, he looks both bewildered and amazed. But right now, Black isn't playing for laughs. He's trying to explain to a visitor the camera technology that allows him to play a hero who is a giant among tiny men and women.
OPINION
August 1, 1993 | S. GREGORY JONES, S. Gregory Jones is a research associate at the Washington-based Council on Hemispheric Affairs
Three centuries ago, the satirist Jonathan Swift proposed that poor Irish children be fattened and served up as food to the rich. His masterwork of ironic logic, "A Modest Proposal, for preventing the Children of poor People in Ireland, from being a Burden to their Parents or Country," comes to mind in light of last Friday's news that seven wretched homeless children, huddled together across the street from a church, had been shot dead by vigilantes in Rio de Janeiro.
NEWS
February 4, 1996 | NANCY MILLS, Nancy Mills is a free-lance writer based in Los Angeles
His tangled brown hair hanging past his shoulders and his clothes mussed and dirty, Ted Danson is hiding in an English stable. He has a crazed look in his eyes, no doubt put there by the eight strange years that his character, shipwrecked doctor Lemuel Gulliver, has spent in Lilliput, Brobdingnag, Laputa, and the land of the Houyhnhnms and Yahoos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1994
Rep. Bill Archer (R-Tex.) suggests placing children of the indigent in foster care (Nov. 11). Doesn't he realize that this would merely shift the taxpayer "burden" of caring for these children from one government agency to another? I suggest that he and his fellow Republicans take a serious look at "A Modest Proposal" satirically offered by Jonathan Swift in the 18th Century--leave the poor out in the cold to starve and sell their young children to the wealthy as a source of food.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1993
Jonathan Swift sought to shame his fellow countrymen into correcting the egregious ills of the 18th Century in his famous satire, "A Modest Proposal." Swift's diabolical plan to eliminate starvation, overpopulation and unemployment was simple, rational and entirely cost effective: Let's eat our children. After having read Lamm's essay, it no longer seems surprising to me that some people took the entirely tongue-in-cheek Swift seriously. According to Lamm, old people aren't cost-effective.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1991 | GRAHAM HEATHCOTE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The story goes that any 18th-Century worshiper who snored during the sermon at St. Patrick's Cathedral here was in peril of waking to find Jonathan Swift looming above him in his pulpit. It's a legend worthy of the author of "Gulliver's Travels," and may well be true. The pulpit, mounted on wheels, is still in the cathedral. So is Swift. Swift is buried beneath the floor near the southwest porch, where everyone goes in and out, many of them drawn to Swift.
NEWS
March 9, 1987 | Jack Smith
As I noted here the other day, the famous journalist Ambrose Bierce, in his little book "Write It Right," urged against the use of the word bug : " Bug for beetle , or for anything. Do not use it." I observed that perhaps Bierce had never heard of the following charming verse: Little bugs have littler bugs Upon their backs to bite 'em, And littler bugs have littler bugs And on ad infinitum.
BOOKS
November 10, 1996 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
LATE BLOOMERS by Brendan Gill (Artisan Press: $14.95, 167 pp.). Col. Sanders, Coco Chanel, Jonathan Swift and Pope John XXIII, all share the experience of having come into their own (in a rather showy way) late in life. But Brendan Gill is coy on the subject of how late is late. Ages are rarely mentioned in these brief portraits (photographs accompanied by a page of biography). "To find oneself is plainly to have been lost," writes Gill in the foreword.
OPINION
January 5, 2013 | By Sue Horton
The Times ran an Op-Ed article on Dec. 28 with the headline " Crayons, pencil, gun: What's missing from the typical kindergartner's backpack? A pistol . " The writer, Daniel Akst, was responding to what he considered an absurd suggestion by the National Rifle Assn. to install armed guards in schools. But rather than write about the NRA proposal directly, Akst wrote about the issue satirically, suggesting that we go a step further and arm children. "We make vaccinations mandatory for most children; why not firearm training?"
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