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November 25, 1991 | By The Times Washington Bureau
SEEING STARS?: The Navy admiral tapped to be President Bush's next deputy national security adviser has yet to take office, but already his appointment has made waves. Adm. Jonathan T. Howe, a top NATO commander in Italy, at first insisted that he retain his four-star rank, which provides him with free housing and will add to his military pension. The prospect of providing housing raised alarm at the Pentagon, which is busy wrestling with a strict congressional budget ceiling.
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NEWS
November 25, 1991 | By The Times Washington Bureau
SEEING STARS?: The Navy admiral tapped to be President Bush's next deputy national security adviser has yet to take office, but already his appointment has made waves. Adm. Jonathan T. Howe, a top NATO commander in Italy, at first insisted that he retain his four-star rank, which provides him with free housing and will add to his military pension. The prospect of providing housing raised alarm at the Pentagon, which is busy wrestling with a strict congressional budget ceiling.
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NEWS
November 20, 1991 | Associated Press
President Bush on Tuesday named Adm. Jonathan T. Howe, the naval commander of U.S. forces in Europe, as his new deputy national security adviser. Howe, 56, succeeds Robert M. Gates, who was sworn in last week as director of the CIA.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | JOHN LANCASTER and KEITH B. RICHBURG, THE WASHINGTON POST
A month before his militia killed 18 U.S. soldiers on Oct. 4, Somali faction leader Mohammed Farah Aidid offered to cease hostilities and begin a "mutual dialogue" with the United Nations, according to a confidential U.N. document. But the peace overture was rejected by the senior U.N. representative in Somalia, retired U.S. Adm. Jonathan T. Howe, and senior U.N. and American military commanders in Somalia, according to John Drysdale, who resigned last month as Howe's political adviser.
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Urging caution in weighing President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's disarmament overtures, NATO's top military commander warned Tuesday that the Soviet threat to Western Europe "is not any less today" than it was when the Cold War first began to thaw. Gen. John R. Galvin, the supreme Allied commander in Europe, said Soviet proposals should be judged in the context of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's 40 years of success in containing the threat from the East. He cautioned against giving too much credit to Gorbachev's public relations victories and added that if the Soviets now offer defense cuts, "it's our initiative they're responding to."
NEWS
April 6, 2003 | Harlan Ullman, Harlan Ullman, a senior associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, is the principal author of "Shock and Awe: Achieving Rapid Dominance."
Leading up to the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom, the Pentagon advertised that it had a strategy to stun the Iraqi leadership into rapid submission -- "shock and awe." The strategy combined a massive bombing campaign centered on Baghdad with a lightning-quick dash by coalition ground forces from Kuwait to the Iraqi capital.
NEWS
May 31, 1988 | JACK NELSON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, concluding their second day at the summit in an atmosphere of continued optimism, Monday reported progress on eliminating two major obstacles to a treaty that would reduce their nations' strategic nuclear arsenals by 50%. The reported gains do not yet amount to the kind of breakthrough needed to complete a strategic arms reduction treaty, known as START, by the end of Reagan's term in January.
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