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Jonathan Tasini

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1993
The Column Left by Jonathan Tasini (Sept. 3) is another misguided slam on unions. Organized labor and working people are not to blame for our poor economy. The blame lies in the greed of corporations in abandoning their workers in this state and country, chasing low wages. The corporations and factories will be back when we lower our wages and standard of living to equal those of the Third World, not the other way around. DAVID J. CLAY Burbank
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OPINION
February 26, 2005
Re "Labor's Lost Love," Opinion, Feb. 20: Excellent article by Jonathan Tasini. As a member of ACLU-Local 660 I always wondered why unions contributed money to certain candidates. Since their coffers are filled by workers' contributions from different political affiliations, Democrats, Republicans, independents, etc., I was under the impression that unions were apolitical, and I felt kind of betrayed when I read about a candidate from the other party getting support from my union. Gina Perez San Gabriel
OPINION
November 27, 2004
Re "Airline Workers: Up in the Air and Losing Ground," Commentary, Nov. 18: Jonathan Tasini has got to be kidding when he says, "Even if a strike drove one carrier out of business, such a scenario would be preferable to the never-ending race to the bottom currently underway." I'm sure the employees of the bankrupt carrier would really appreciate this tactic. If this is the best a "labor strategist" can come up with, I would suggest that airline workers no longer need unions. In fact, eroding benefits and shrinking wages are a nationwide problem, not limited to the airline industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2011
SATURDAY Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC The Chris Matthews Show Tax hikes for the wealthiest: Joe Klein, Time; Becky Quick, CNBC; Andrew Sullivan, the Daily Beast; Norah O'Donnell, NBC. (N) 5 p.m. KNBC McLaughlin Group (N) 6:30 p.m. KCET SUNDAY Today Countdown to the royal wedding. (N) 6 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America (N) 6 a.m. KABC State of the Union With Candy Crowley Budget battles: Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.); Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.). Libya and NATO: former CIA Director Gen. Michael Hayden (Ret.)
NATIONAL
September 13, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Conservative and moderate Republicans were locked in a close House race Tuesday night in Arizona that could have an effect on the national immigration debate. With 89% of the precincts reporting, Randy Graf, who made his opposition to illegal immigration the center of his campaign, was leading moderate state Rep. Steve Huffmanor 43% to 37% for the Tucson-area seat left open by retiring moderate GOP Rep. Jim Kolbe.
NEWS
July 23, 2001
In "Weighing the Classics" (July 15) on the California Department of Education's new recommended reading list, you and some of the interviewees imply that because all of Mortimer Adler's "great books" are not on the list, then the list is "dumbed down" and its compilers "look like morons." But it's a K-12 list. A high school book needs to be teachable as well as great. Any English teacher (I'm one) will tell you it's tough to find books that "work" in high school. Yes, we need to consider the difficulty and the adolescent appeal of a work as well as its quality.
NEWS
January 2, 2001 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Wallis didn't need scratch paper to compute the potential. A story based on a prison interview he'd conducted with ousted Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega in 1998 sold more than 20 times. He made a cool $20,000. "It really opened my eyes to the allure of selling work. The possibilities." It suggested that the life of a story was much longer--and more lucrative--than he had ever imagined.
NEWS
June 26, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Freelance writers, not the publishers of newspapers or magazines, own the copyright to their articles that appear in electronic databases, the Supreme Court ruled Monday, a decision that could cost publishers millions of dollars in fees and may force them to delete past articles from their electronic files. The 7-2 ruling answers a question that probably should have been answered by publishers at least a decade ago.
OPINION
January 24, 2012 | By Jonathan Tasini
Politicians bickering over private equity's impact on jobs and how to bring down the high unemployment rate are entirely missing the point about the crisis facing working Americans. The predicament we face isn't simply that there are too few jobs; it's also that an increasing number of workers don't have the kind of job that can pay the bills. While productivity has grown by more than 80% over the last 30 years, wages have effectively been flat for 80% of Americans. So, although we're making stuff faster and more efficiently, the benefits of that hard work have not trickled into the pockets of the people who do it. Let's turn first to the intensifying debate over Mitt Romney's role as a private equity manager.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a big guy/little guy scenario: the multibillion-dollar newspaper and magazine empires versus the lowly and low-paid freelance writers. The battle lines are drawn. The stage is set. Now comes the end of the seven-year legal battle that will be played out later this month in the solemn, wood-paneled chambers of the U.S. Supreme Court. The case's core issue is one freelancers say is key to their livelihood.
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