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September 20, 1998 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
It's thrilling to be in the spotlight, but hot and blinding, too. Jonathan Tolins found that out in 1993, when his play "The Twilight of the Golds" premiered at the Pasadena Playhouse. He was just 26, with only a few small plays under his belt, when "Twilight of the Golds" suddenly became the topic of impassioned conversation everywhere. A movie deal quickly followed, and the play headed for Broadway.
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August 11, 2013 | By Patrick Pacheco
NEW YORK - Michael Urie sits in a West Village restaurant making a few subtle gestures. A flutter of the hands and you imagine the fingernails. A squint of the eyes and the famously furrowed expression pops into view. A tilt of the head just so and there, like a line drawing from an artist's sketchpad, is Barbra Streisand. "I don't have to do an impression of her, thank God," says the 33-year-old actor. "I give you a taste, and you fill in the rest. It's like a magic act. " The conjuring is in the service of Jonathan Tolins' play "Buyer and Cellar," the off-Broadway comedy that has become the summer's sleeper hit, a fever dream in which Urie stars as Alex More, an unemployed Los Angeles actor who is thrust into a close relationship with the superstar when he is hired to watch over a mall of shops she has built in a cellar on her Malibu compound.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1993 | ALEENE MacMINN, ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Golds' Strikes Gold: "The Twilight of the Golds," the new work by 26-year-old playwright Jonathan Tolins that is currently in its inaugural run at the Pasadena Playhouse, is headed for the movie screen. Hollywood Pictures has purchased the rights to Tolins' provocative play that tells of a family facing a highly unusual moral dilemma. Tolins and his writing partner Seth Bass (who did not write "Golds" with Tolins) will adapt the play for the screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1998 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard to remember the last time a funny, provocative comedy set primarily in L.A. premiered at the Pasadena Playhouse. Then again, memories play tricks--or so says the playwright who has finally ended the aforementioned drought. In Jonathan Tolins' "If Memory Serves," which opened Sunday with a bang, a mother and her newly adult son try to remember whether she abused him. Because she's a former TV star, this is no leisurely trip down memory lane.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1998
Pasadena Playhouse's new artistic director Sheldon Epps has announced his first season picks since his appointment: Noel Coward's "Present Laughter" (July 19-Aug. 23), to be directed by Richard Seyd; "If Memory Serves" (Sept. 20-Oct. 25), a new play about a former TV star and her disgruntled son, by Jonathan Tolins, author of the theater's previous hit "The Twilight of the Golds"; and the West Coast premiere of Judith Shubow Steir's new musical about the Duke of Windsor and Wallis Simpson, "Only a Kingdom" (Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1998 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard to remember the last time a funny, provocative comedy set primarily in L.A. premiered at the Pasadena Playhouse. Then again, memories play tricks--or so says the playwright who has finally ended the aforementioned drought. In Jonathan Tolins' "If Memory Serves," which opened Sunday with a bang, a mother and her newly adult son try to remember whether she abused him. Because she's a former TV star, this is no leisurely trip down memory lane.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Just when it was beginning to look as if the Pasadena Playhouse was going to devote itself to complacent comedies and other crowd-pleasers, it comes up with Jonathan Tolins' "Twilight of the Golds." "Golds," which opened Sunday, is a flawed piece with some seriously underwritten characters. It has a couple of long monologues that need cutting. It has early exposition that all but broadcasts the trouble ahead. But . . . it also has a couple of short monologues that will knock your socks off.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2013 | By Patrick Pacheco
NEW YORK - Michael Urie sits in a West Village restaurant making a few subtle gestures. A flutter of the hands and you imagine the fingernails. A squint of the eyes and the famously furrowed expression pops into view. A tilt of the head just so and there, like a line drawing from an artist's sketchpad, is Barbra Streisand. "I don't have to do an impression of her, thank God," says the 33-year-old actor. "I give you a taste, and you fill in the rest. It's like a magic act. " The conjuring is in the service of Jonathan Tolins' play "Buyer and Cellar," the off-Broadway comedy that has become the summer's sleeper hit, a fever dream in which Urie stars as Alex More, an unemployed Los Angeles actor who is thrust into a close relationship with the superstar when he is hired to watch over a mall of shops she has built in a cellar on her Malibu compound.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Curtain Calls: The premiere of Los Angeles playwright Jonathan Tolins' "The Twilight of the Golds" will open the Pasadena Playhouse's next season, playing Jan. 8-Feb. 21. "Golds" will be followed by a revival of Wendy Wasserstein's "Isn't It Romantic?" (March 12-April 25) and by Lawrence Roman's "Alone Together" (May 14-June 27).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1998
"If Memory Serves," Jonathan Tolins' dark comedy, ends Sunday. The plot centers on a former TV sitcom queen (Brooke Adams) and her grown son, who, as the national media look on, try to recall whether she abused him. Pasadena Playhouse, 39 S. El Molino Ave. Today-Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 5 and 9 p.m.; Sunday, 2 and 7 p.m. $13.50-$42.50. (800) 233-3123.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1998 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
It's thrilling to be in the spotlight, but hot and blinding, too. Jonathan Tolins found that out in 1993, when his play "The Twilight of the Golds" premiered at the Pasadena Playhouse. He was just 26, with only a few small plays under his belt, when "Twilight of the Golds" suddenly became the topic of impassioned conversation everywhere. A movie deal quickly followed, and the play headed for Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1998
Pasadena Playhouse's new artistic director Sheldon Epps has announced his first season picks since his appointment: Noel Coward's "Present Laughter" (July 19-Aug. 23), to be directed by Richard Seyd; "If Memory Serves" (Sept. 20-Oct. 25), a new play about a former TV star and her disgruntled son, by Jonathan Tolins, author of the theater's previous hit "The Twilight of the Golds"; and the West Coast premiere of Judith Shubow Steir's new musical about the Duke of Windsor and Wallis Simpson, "Only a Kingdom" (Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1993 | ALEENE MacMINN, ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Golds' Strikes Gold: "The Twilight of the Golds," the new work by 26-year-old playwright Jonathan Tolins that is currently in its inaugural run at the Pasadena Playhouse, is headed for the movie screen. Hollywood Pictures has purchased the rights to Tolins' provocative play that tells of a family facing a highly unusual moral dilemma. Tolins and his writing partner Seth Bass (who did not write "Golds" with Tolins) will adapt the play for the screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Just when it was beginning to look as if the Pasadena Playhouse was going to devote itself to complacent comedies and other crowd-pleasers, it comes up with Jonathan Tolins' "Twilight of the Golds." "Golds," which opened Sunday, is a flawed piece with some seriously underwritten characters. It has a couple of long monologues that need cutting. It has early exposition that all but broadcasts the trouble ahead. But . . . it also has a couple of short monologues that will knock your socks off.
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