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REAL ESTATE
July 26, 1987
The Los Angeles division of Charlotte, N.C.-based J. A. Jones Construction Co. has moved to 5771 Rickenbacker Road, Commerce.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2013 | Bloomberg News
William C. Cox Jr., the patriarch of the Bancroft clan that controlled Dow Jones & Co. for 105 years and sold it to Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. in a decision sparking a family feud, died Wednesday at his home in Hobe Sound, Fla., according to his daughter, Ann Bartram. He was 82. The cause was complications from diabetes. Cox was at the center of a protracted family dispute that ultimately led to the sale of New York-based Dow Jones, owner of the Wall Street Journal, to News Corp.
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NEWS
May 25, 1996
Bettina Bancroft, 55, former director of Dow Jones & Co. Inc., which is partly owned by her family. Born in Boston, Bancroft was a great-granddaughter of Clarence W. Barron, who bought Dow Jones in 1902 from its co-founder Charles H. Dow. The financially oriented company publishes the Wall Street Journal and Barron's magazine. Bancroft was elected a director in 1982 to represent the Bancroft and Barron family descendants and served until last month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2012
Mark O'Donnell Tony-winning co-writer of 'Hairspray' Mark O'Donnell, 58, the Tony Award-winning writer behind such quirky and clever Broadway shows as "Hairspray and "Cry-Baby," died Monday in New York. His agent, Jack Tantleff, said the writer collapsed in the lobby of his apartment complex on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. O'Donnell won the 2003 Tony for best book of a musical for co-writing "Hairspray" with Thomas Meehan, and the pair earned Tony nominations in 2008 for doing the same for "Cry-Baby.
SPORTS
March 3, 1993 | BARBIE LUDOVISE
Pete Bonny envisioned wondrous things for his Marina girls' basketball team Tuesday night. Unfortunately for Marina, Bonny will have to keep on wondering. For the second consecutive year, the Vikings fell to top-seeded Thousand Oaks in a Southern Section Division I-A semifinal, losing, 65-42, at Edison High School. Although the game had its high points for Marina--especially considering that last year's loss was by 41--Bonny wasn't in the mood to look on the bright side.
SPORTS
May 13, 1991
Tom Grindel of Del Mar and Cathy Jones of Leucadia defeated Tim Muret and Wendy Lewis of Cardiff to win the co-ed open division of the Jose Cuervo amateur beach volleyball tournament Sunday at Capistrano Beach. Grindel and Jones won, 15-4. Kirt Riedl of San Juan Capistrano and Shannon Meixsell of Dana Point finished third.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2007 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Media baron Rupert Murdoch did not win the support of a solid majority of the family that controls the Wall Street Journal by a Monday deadline, casting doubt on the prospects for his $5-billion takeover bid. More than five hours after the 2 p.m. EST deadline for members of the Bancroft family to tell their lawyers how they were voting, their Boston firm still hadn't issued a statement.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1991 | From Dow Jones News Service
Dow Jones & Co. and Group W Satellite Communications filed an appeal of last week's disqualification by a U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge of their $115-million joint bid to acquire Financial News Network Inc. The appeal was expected. Separately, the Federal Trade Commission filed an appeal of a U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge's ruling that any litigation, including a possible antitrust suit involving the pending FNN acquisition, must go through the bankruptcy court.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2007 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Investors bet Friday that the Wall Street Journal would not only be sold, but also fetch a higher price than what's on the table. Stock in Dow Jones & Co., owner of the Journal and other financial media, jumped $7.89 to $61.20, the highest price in more than five years. The Bancroft family that controls the media company has rejected a bid of $60 a share, or $5 billion, from Rupert Murdoch's News Corp.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1992 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pacific Bell has begun offering a call-in headline news service in Southern California, becoming the first of the regional Bell telephone companies to test what many experts believe could be a huge market for information services delivered over conventional phone lines. The new service--a joint effort of Pacific Bell and Dow Jones & Co., publisher of The Wall Street Journal--pairs two of the most aggressive players in the emerging market for electronic voice information.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2011 | By Joe Flint, Meg James and Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
The News Corp. phone-hacking scandal claimed two high-ranking executives running the company's U.S. and British operations as Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch tried to stem the fallout from a growing crisis he had been downplaying. The resignations of longtime Murdoch intimates Les Hinton as chief executive of Dow Jones & Co. and publisher of its Wall Street Journal and Rebekah Brooks as chief of News International in London came hours apart Friday. Hinton was in charge of News International and Brooks was editor of its News of the World when many of the hacking incidents are alleged to have occurred.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2007 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Media baron Rupert Murdoch did not win the support of a solid majority of the family that controls the Wall Street Journal by a Monday deadline, casting doubt on the prospects for his $5-billion takeover bid. More than five hours after the 2 p.m. EST deadline for members of the Bancroft family to tell their lawyers how they were voting, their Boston firm still hadn't issued a statement.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2007 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Investors bet Friday that the Wall Street Journal would not only be sold, but also fetch a higher price than what's on the table. Stock in Dow Jones & Co., owner of the Journal and other financial media, jumped $7.89 to $61.20, the highest price in more than five years. The Bancroft family that controls the media company has rejected a bid of $60 a share, or $5 billion, from Rupert Murdoch's News Corp.
SPORTS
February 9, 2002 | DAMON HACK, NEWSDAY
After rolling in a six-foot birdie putt on the 18th green that kept him around for the weekend, Tiger Woods shot a glance to his caddie, Steve Williams, and broke into a quick smile. Williams grabbed Woods' putter, pretended to break it over his leg, and tossed it to the ground in mock disgust. Somehow, they cheated the fates. Somehow, Woods survived his 81st official cut in a row despite a round that had the gallery scattering like pigeons as he fought to keep his ball on a straight line.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1999
The best post-Grammy hot spot in your city? Ertegun: Elaine's Restaurant. Jones: Matsuhisa or anywhere Wolfgang Puck is cooking. * The official Grammy cocktail in your city? E: Dry Manhattan. J: Stoli and cranberry juice with a lime twist. * The official Grammy dessert in your city? E: Greene apple tart. Michael's, that is. J: Warm chocolate souffle with whipped cream. * The best vehicle to be seen arriving in? E: A stretch Volkswagen Bug, or Seymour Stein's pickup truck.
NEWS
May 25, 1996
Bettina Bancroft, 55, former director of Dow Jones & Co. Inc., which is partly owned by her family. Born in Boston, Bancroft was a great-granddaughter of Clarence W. Barron, who bought Dow Jones in 1902 from its co-founder Charles H. Dow. The financially oriented company publishes the Wall Street Journal and Barron's magazine. Bancroft was elected a director in 1982 to represent the Bancroft and Barron family descendants and served until last month.
SPORTS
February 9, 2002 | DAMON HACK, NEWSDAY
After rolling in a six-foot birdie putt on the 18th green that kept him around for the weekend, Tiger Woods shot a glance to his caddie, Steve Williams, and broke into a quick smile. Williams grabbed Woods' putter, pretended to break it over his leg, and tossed it to the ground in mock disgust. Somehow, they cheated the fates. Somehow, Woods survived his 81st official cut in a row despite a round that had the gallery scattering like pigeons as he fought to keep his ball on a straight line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2013 | Bloomberg News
William C. Cox Jr., the patriarch of the Bancroft clan that controlled Dow Jones & Co. for 105 years and sold it to Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. in a decision sparking a family feud, died Wednesday at his home in Hobe Sound, Fla., according to his daughter, Ann Bartram. He was 82. The cause was complications from diabetes. Cox was at the center of a protracted family dispute that ultimately led to the sale of New York-based Dow Jones, owner of the Wall Street Journal, to News Corp.
SPORTS
March 3, 1993 | BARBIE LUDOVISE
Pete Bonny envisioned wondrous things for his Marina girls' basketball team Tuesday night. Unfortunately for Marina, Bonny will have to keep on wondering. For the second consecutive year, the Vikings fell to top-seeded Thousand Oaks in a Southern Section Division I-A semifinal, losing, 65-42, at Edison High School. Although the game had its high points for Marina--especially considering that last year's loss was by 41--Bonny wasn't in the mood to look on the bright side.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1992 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pacific Bell has begun offering a call-in headline news service in Southern California, becoming the first of the regional Bell telephone companies to test what many experts believe could be a huge market for information services delivered over conventional phone lines. The new service--a joint effort of Pacific Bell and Dow Jones & Co., publisher of The Wall Street Journal--pairs two of the most aggressive players in the emerging market for electronic voice information.
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