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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A temporary worker who took data about an electronic voting company from a law firm's computers avoided jail time in a plea agreement with prosecutors. Stephen Mark Heller, 44, pleaded guilty Nov. 20 to unlawfully accessing a computer at the Jones Day law firm in Los Angeles. The firm represented voting machine manufacturer Diebold Inc. Heller took memos stating that Diebold might have broken laws. The memos were subsequently leaked to the media.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1992
State Sen. Diane Watson said Monday that her leading opponent in Los Angeles County's 2nd District supervisorial race, attorney Yvonne Brathwaite Burke, should disclose the names of the clients she has represented. "Now that Ms. Burke is seeking to return to the public sector, she has the obligation to tell the public who her clients have been and how much she has been paid by special interests she has represented for the past 14 years," Watson said at a news conference.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1993 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's second-largest law firm--Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue--agreed Monday to pay a record $51 million to savings and loan regulators for its role in the 1989 collapse of Lincoln Savings & Loan. In a lawsuit, the Resolution Trust Corp. had accused Jones Day of helping Charles H. Keating Jr. keep control of the Irvine-based financial institution, even though the law firm knew that Keating was looting it. The case was settled shortly before it was to go to trial in Tucson.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County managing partner of a major Los Angeles law firm has defected with five other attorneys to competitor Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue in Irvine. The mass departure last week drained the Irvine office of Wyman, Bautzer, Kuchel & Silbert of 25% of its attorney staff. Thomas R.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arthur Andersen & Co., one of the three major accounting firms sued in the wake of Lincoln Savings & Loan's 1989 collapse, reached a $30-million settlement Monday with investors in the thrift's parent company. Sources also said the investors could receive an additional $40-million settlement in the pending bankruptcy reorganization of Drexel Burnham Lambert, the former brokerage that specialized in sales of junk bonds.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Charles M. Carberry, the federal prosecutor who has directly supervised most of the government's ground-breaking insider trading cases, will leave the government in October to become a criminal defense lawyer, fellow prosecutors said Tuesday. Carberry, 37, will join the New York office of Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue, a Cleveland-based law firm, after eight years with the U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan, including two years as head of its securities fraud unit.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators probably will add Lee Henkel, a former top U.S. thrift regulator, as a defendant in the government's $2.7-billion fraud and racketeering lawsuit against former owners and operators of Lincoln Savings & Loan, a government source said Monday. Henkel and his former law firm, Troutman, Sanders, Lockerman & Ashmore in Atlanta, are two of at least nine major law firms, accounting firms and others that the Resolution Trust Corp.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1993 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's second-largest law firm--Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue--agreed Monday to pay a record $51 million to savings and loan regulators for its role in the 1989 collapse of Lincoln Savings & Loan. In a lawsuit, the Resolution Trust Corp. had accused Jones Day of helping Charles H. Keating Jr. keep control of the Irvine-based financial institution, even though the law firm knew that Keating was looting it. The case was settled shortly before it was to go to trial in Tucson.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Startling internal documents at a major national law firm about political contributions sought by former Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr. are raising questions about the use of professionals to help finance campaigns and the limits of a lawyer's duty to clients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1992
State Sen. Diane Watson said Monday that her leading opponent in Los Angeles County's 2nd District supervisorial race, attorney Yvonne Brathwaite Burke, should disclose the names of the clients she has represented. "Now that Ms. Burke is seeking to return to the public sector, she has the obligation to tell the public who her clients have been and how much she has been paid by special interests she has represented for the past 14 years," Watson said at a news conference.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's largest accounting firm and second-biggest law firm Monday agreed to pay $87 million to settle fraud charges stemming from the collapse of Lincoln Savings & Loan, making it likely that small investors will eventually recover all their losses in the debacle. The out-of-court agreements call for accounting firm Ernst & Young to pay $63 million and the Cleveland-based law firm Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue to contribute $24 million to settle the fraud and negligence charges.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arthur Andersen & Co., one of the three major accounting firms sued in the wake of Lincoln Savings & Loan's 1989 collapse, reached a $30-million settlement Monday with investors in the thrift's parent company. Sources also said the investors could receive an additional $40-million settlement in the pending bankruptcy reorganization of Drexel Burnham Lambert, the former brokerage that specialized in sales of junk bonds.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Startling internal documents at a major national law firm about political contributions sought by former Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr. are raising questions about the use of professionals to help finance campaigns and the limits of a lawyer's duty to clients.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators probably will add Lee Henkel, a former top U.S. thrift regulator, as a defendant in the government's $2.7-billion fraud and racketeering lawsuit against former owners and operators of Lincoln Savings & Loan, a government source said Monday. Henkel and his former law firm, Troutman, Sanders, Lockerman & Ashmore in Atlanta, are two of at least nine major law firms, accounting firms and others that the Resolution Trust Corp.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's largest accounting firm and second-biggest law firm Monday agreed to pay $87 million to settle fraud charges stemming from the collapse of Lincoln Savings & Loan, making it likely that small investors will eventually recover all their losses in the debacle. The out-of-court agreements call for accounting firm Ernst & Young to pay $63 million and the Cleveland-based law firm Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue to contribute $24 million to settle the fraud and negligence charges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A temporary worker who took data about an electronic voting company from a law firm's computers avoided jail time in a plea agreement with prosecutors. Stephen Mark Heller, 44, pleaded guilty Nov. 20 to unlawfully accessing a computer at the Jones Day law firm in Los Angeles. The firm represented voting machine manufacturer Diebold Inc. Heller took memos stating that Diebold might have broken laws. The memos were subsequently leaked to the media.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County managing partner of a major Los Angeles law firm has defected with five other attorneys to competitor Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue in Irvine. The mass departure last week drained the Irvine office of Wyman, Bautzer, Kuchel & Silbert of 25% of its attorney staff. Thomas R.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Charles M. Carberry, the federal prosecutor who has directly supervised most of the government's ground-breaking insider trading cases, will leave the government in October to become a criminal defense lawyer, fellow prosecutors said Tuesday. Carberry, 37, will join the New York office of Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue, a Cleveland-based law firm, after eight years with the U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan, including two years as head of its securities fraud unit.
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