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WORLD
December 21, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - South Sudanese militias fired on two U.S. military aircraft Saturday, wounding four U.S. servicemen, one of them critically, according to American military officials. The two planes were headed to Bor, north of the capital Juba, the main town in the eastern state of Jonglei, which is under the control of a rebel military faction associated with sacked vice president Riek Machar. Intense fighting has been going on in the region as South Sudan's army struggles to take back the town.
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WORLD
February 4, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JUBA, South Sudan -- Toddlers tottering in the dust, elderly men sitting in the shade to escape the sapping heat, clustering flies, the drifting smoke of cooking fires and the sour smell of too many people crowded into a small space. If things are bad now at the displaced-persons camp near the main U.N. peacekeeping base in Juba, South Sudan, they'll soon be much worse. The rains are coming within months. They'll bring malaria, mud, perhaps cholera, and make life in these camps even more miserable.
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WORLD
January 4, 2014 | By Stephanie Findlay
PRETORIA, South Africa - Face-to-face peace talks between warring parties in South Sudan were stalled Saturday, government officials and rebel delegations said, dashing hopes of a swift end to the bloodshed. Representatives of President Salva Kiir's government and rebels loyal to his former vice president, Riek Machar, began preliminary negotiations through mediators in neighboring Ethiopia on Friday. The talks are seen as a step toward ending the violence that has killed at least 1,000 people, driven tens of thousands from their homes and threatens to plunge the world's newest country into civil war. But a cease-fire appeared to be a long way off Saturday as government and rebel delegations in Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, reported that direct talks in the Sheraton Hotel had been delayed as the two parties work through the mediators to set a negotiating agenda.
WORLD
February 4, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JUBA, South Sudan - Toddlers tottering in the dust, elderly men sitting in the shade to escape the sapping heat, clustering flies, the drifting smoke of cooking fires, and the sour smell of far too many people crowded into a small space. If things are bad now at the displaced persons camp near the main U.N. peacekeeping base in Juba, the capital of South Sudan, they'll soon be much worse. The rains are coming. By April or May they'll bring malaria, mud, perhaps cholera, and make life in these camps even more miserable.
WORLD
March 14, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
The two wards are at opposite ends of the hospital. One ward is silent but for a baby boy, gurgling on a bed in a corridor. A toddler wanders around with a machete scar on his head. The boys' parents are dead. In the other ward lies one of the men who attacked them. When Gai Nashir was a baby, his father was also killed, by members of the boys' tribe. Quick to anger, he grew up with an enemy. "This war began before I was even born," says Nashir, who was wounded in December when he and other members of his Nuer tribe shot and hacked to death hundreds of men, women and children of the Murle tribe in the darkest episode in the short, troubled history of the world's newest country, South Sudan.
WORLD
December 28, 2013 | By Erin Conway-Smith
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Thousands of armed youths loyal to South Sudan's rebel leader are preparing to launch an assault on the key town of Bor, a government official said Saturday, as continued fighting in the fragile new country dimmed prospects of a cease-fire. The South Sudanese government has said it is willing to end hostilities with rebels led by former Vice President Riek Machar, who is in a power struggle with President Salva Kiir. But Machar has responded warily to the calls by East African countries for a truce, telling the BBC that any talks of a cease-fire must be serious and credible, and negotiated by representatives from both sides.
WORLD
February 4, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JUBA, South Sudan -- Toddlers tottering in the dust, elderly men sitting in the shade to escape the sapping heat, clustering flies, the drifting smoke of cooking fires and the sour smell of too many people crowded into a small space. If things are bad now at the displaced-persons camp near the main U.N. peacekeeping base in Juba, South Sudan, they'll soon be much worse. The rains are coming within months. They'll bring malaria, mud, perhaps cholera, and make life in these camps even more miserable.
WORLD
January 31, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
MALAKAL, South Sudan - The looters came by the thousands. They were organized, systematic and took their time. At two World Food Program warehouses in this dusty South Sudanese town, they opened thousands of USAID cans of vegetable oil and poured the contents into stolen jerry cans. They ripped open packets of high-nutrition food and took the contents. They stole computers, light fittings, fans and roof tiles, and even cut away the canvas from storage tents. The food they took - 1,700 tons in all - would have fed more than 100,000 families for a month.
WORLD
February 4, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JUBA, South Sudan - Toddlers tottering in the dust, elderly men sitting in the shade to escape the sapping heat, clustering flies, the drifting smoke of cooking fires, and the sour smell of far too many people crowded into a small space. If things are bad now at the displaced persons camp near the main U.N. peacekeeping base in Juba, the capital of South Sudan, they'll soon be much worse. The rains are coming. By April or May they'll bring malaria, mud, perhaps cholera, and make life in these camps even more miserable.
WORLD
December 21, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
This post has been updated. See the note below for details. A United Nations helicopter was shot down after being targeted by South Sudanese armed forces, killing all four crew members on board, U.N. deputy spokesman Eduardo del Buey said Friday. The MI-8 helicopter, which was not carrying passengers, crashed in the eastern state of Jonglei, the U.N. peacekeeping mission in South Sudan said in a brief statement . South Sudanese armed forces informed the U.N. peacekeeping mission that they had shot at a helicopter near the settlement of Likuangole on Friday, the same area where the crash occurred, Del Buey said.
WORLD
January 31, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
MALAKAL, South Sudan - The looters came by the thousands. They were organized, systematic and took their time. At two World Food Program warehouses in this dusty South Sudanese town, they opened thousands of USAID cans of vegetable oil and poured the contents into stolen jerry cans. They ripped open packets of high-nutrition food and took the contents. They stole computers, light fittings, fans and roof tiles, and even cut away the canvas from storage tents. The food they took - 1,700 tons in all - would have fed more than 100,000 families for a month.
WORLD
January 4, 2014 | By Stephanie Findlay
PRETORIA, South Africa - Face-to-face peace talks between warring parties in South Sudan were stalled Saturday, government officials and rebel delegations said, dashing hopes of a swift end to the bloodshed. Representatives of President Salva Kiir's government and rebels loyal to his former vice president, Riek Machar, began preliminary negotiations through mediators in neighboring Ethiopia on Friday. The talks are seen as a step toward ending the violence that has killed at least 1,000 people, driven tens of thousands from their homes and threatens to plunge the world's newest country into civil war. But a cease-fire appeared to be a long way off Saturday as government and rebel delegations in Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, reported that direct talks in the Sheraton Hotel had been delayed as the two parties work through the mediators to set a negotiating agenda.
WORLD
December 28, 2013 | By Erin Conway-Smith
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Thousands of armed youths loyal to South Sudan's rebel leader are preparing to launch an assault on the key town of Bor, a government official said Saturday, as continued fighting in the fragile new country dimmed prospects of a cease-fire. The South Sudanese government has said it is willing to end hostilities with rebels led by former Vice President Riek Machar, who is in a power struggle with President Salva Kiir. But Machar has responded warily to the calls by East African countries for a truce, telling the BBC that any talks of a cease-fire must be serious and credible, and negotiated by representatives from both sides.
WORLD
December 21, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - South Sudanese militias fired on two U.S. military aircraft Saturday, wounding four U.S. servicemen, one of them critically, according to American military officials. The two planes were headed to Bor, north of the capital Juba, the main town in the eastern state of Jonglei, which is under the control of a rebel military faction associated with sacked vice president Riek Machar. Intense fighting has been going on in the region as South Sudan's army struggles to take back the town.
WORLD
March 14, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
The two wards are at opposite ends of the hospital. One ward is silent but for a baby boy, gurgling on a bed in a corridor. A toddler wanders around with a machete scar on his head. The boys' parents are dead. In the other ward lies one of the men who attacked them. When Gai Nashir was a baby, his father was also killed, by members of the boys' tribe. Quick to anger, he grew up with an enemy. "This war began before I was even born," says Nashir, who was wounded in December when he and other members of his Nuer tribe shot and hacked to death hundreds of men, women and children of the Murle tribe in the darkest episode in the short, troubled history of the world's newest country, South Sudan.
WORLD
December 22, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
HONOLULU -- President Obama told congressional leaders Sunday that he was closely monitoring the unrest in South Sudan, after four U.S. service members were attacked near Bor, and said he “may take further action to support the security of U.S. citizens, personnel and property, including our Embassy, in South Sudan.” After an aborted rescue mission of U.S. citizens Saturday, 380 U.S. officials and private citizens -- as well as 300 citizens of...
WORLD
December 19, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Fears of civil war in South Sudan grew Thursday, after South Sudan's military admitted losing control of a key town in the country's east to army mutineers. The army lost Bor, the capital of Jonglei state, to a military faction associated with former Vice President Riek Machar, who has been accused by President Salva Kiir of launching a coup. Fighting continued in the region Thursday. Machar denies any coup attempt, claiming that Kiir is inciting ethnic tensions.
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