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Joni James

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September 1, 1995 | ROBERT HILBURN
For too long, Joni James has been a virtually forgotten name in American pop. Though she was one of the most appealing pop vocalists in the early and mid-'50s, I hadn't seen her mentioned in print in decades until the news came that she'll appear in concert with a 12-piece orchestra on Sept. 17 at the Academy Plaza Theatre in North Hollywood. (Ticket information: (818) 785-8885).
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1995 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
There's a movie in the Joni James story, a story that resurfaced in dramatic, heartwarming fashion Saturday night at the Academy Plaza Theatre when the one-time queen of American pop gave her first formal Los Angeles concert in 35 years. "How Important Can It Be?" isn't just the title of one of James' biggest hits from the early 1950s, but it's also the question the Chicago-native had to ask herself about her own stardom three decades ago.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1995 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
There's a movie in the Joni James story, a story that resurfaced in dramatic, heartwarming fashion Saturday night at the Academy Plaza Theatre when the one-time queen of American pop gave her first formal Los Angeles concert in 35 years. "How Important Can It Be?" isn't just the title of one of James' biggest hits from the early 1950s, but it's also the question the Chicago-native had to ask herself about her own stardom three decades ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1995 | ROBERT HILBURN
For too long, Joni James has been a virtually forgotten name in American pop. Though she was one of the most appealing pop vocalists in the early and mid-'50s, I hadn't seen her mentioned in print in decades until the news came that she'll appear in concert with a 12-piece orchestra on Sept. 17 at the Academy Plaza Theatre in North Hollywood. (Ticket information: (818) 785-8885).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1986 | Peter H. Brown
Pop queen Joni James marched into the executive offices of MGM Records two decades ago and laid down a payment in six figures to buy back the masters of her enormous catalogue of 25 top 40 singles and more than 20 LPs. James, now living in Miami, furiously guarded such hits as "How Important Can It Be?" from Golden Oldie marketeers. She even declined a $1.3-million offer from a mass TV sales corporation to market a three-record set in 1979.
NEWS
October 2, 1986
Anthony Acquaviva, a composer-conductor whose lush recordings with his wife, singer Joni James, sold millions of copies in the 1950s and '60s, died Saturday in Florida. Acquaviva was 61 and died of complications of diabetes. He and his wife had moved to Florida from Beverly Hills many years ago after adopting two children. A West Point graduate who served with the Army's orchestral division from 1944 to 1948, Acquaviva met Miss James in a recording session.
NEWS
October 2, 1986 | DENISE ABBOTT, Abbott is a Los Angeles free-lance writer. and
Dan Alvino can't forget that Bob and Earl did the original "Harlem Shuffle" in the early '50s. Or that Ginny Arnell, a singer who never had a hit record, recorded an album for MGM in 1964. "I can't tell you why I remember these things," he said. "Either you have it or you don't." Alvino apparently does. And that has earned him the gratitude of Valley record collectors and people whose business is coming up with vintage music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1995
Everybody likes a little gossip, and Betty Garrett is no exception. Garrett, a veteran of stage and screen, will present her one-woman show "No Dogs or Actors Allowed" this weekend at Theatre West in Universal City. The show, first produced at Theatre West in 1989, is an evening of personal anecdotes from Garrett's career. "Most of the stories are funny and affectionate," Garrett says. "I felt it was time to do it again."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2005 | From the Washington Post
Bernard A. Schriever, a retired Air Force general who successfully shepherded the development of the intercontinental ballistic missile program and established a framework for the Air Force's space program, has died. He was 94. An aeronautical engineer by training, Schriever died June 20 of complications from pneumonia at his home in Washington, D.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Andrea Marcovicci came up with a good idea Saturday night at UCLA's Royce Hall: Embrace the music of the '60s and later as a continuing installment in the Great American Songbook. Toward that end, she devoted the first half of her program to songs by Lennon & McCartney, Paul Simon, Joni Mitchell, James Taylor, Stevie Wonder and Jimmy Webb, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1986 | Peter H. Brown
Pop queen Joni James marched into the executive offices of MGM Records two decades ago and laid down a payment in six figures to buy back the masters of her enormous catalogue of 25 top 40 singles and more than 20 LPs. James, now living in Miami, furiously guarded such hits as "How Important Can It Be?" from Golden Oldie marketeers. She even declined a $1.3-million offer from a mass TV sales corporation to market a three-record set in 1979.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2008
Playwright Laurel Ollstein is a bit of a cliche in this town: Actress-writer-director. But she's the real deal. As a member of the Hollywood ensemble company the Actors' Gang, she has worked as an actress and playwright in many collaborative pieces, including "Hysteria," "Blood Love Madness" and "Insomniac." Her award-winning one-woman play on writer Dorothy Parker was produced across the country and she currently teaches playwriting, acting, directing and screenwriting.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1988 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
There's nothing more frustrating to a true country music fan than the fact that more than a dozen albums by Hank Williams Jr. have been released on CD and none by the late Hank Williams Sr., the most influential and acclaimed figure in modern country music. But the wait is finally over. Polygram, which owns the rights to all of Williams' late '40s and early '50s recordings on MGM Records, has released a two-disc set that contains 40 of Williams' most important recordings.
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