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Joni Mitchell

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April 22, 2010 | By Matt Diehl, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"People used to say nobody can sing my songs but me — they're too personal," Joni Mitchell explained last week during a rare interview. Apparently, nobody told John Kelly not to try adapting her songs. The renowned Obie Award-winning actor and performance artist has been belting out Mitchell's songs for more than 20 years. This weekend, the New York-based Kelly concludes the L.A. run of his acclaimed solo tribute to the iconic, iconoclastic singer-songwriter, "Paved Paradise: The Art of Joni Mitchell," at Renberg Theatre.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012
Possessed of a delicate yet powerful voice, indie folk singer Laura Marling was only 16 when she first started gaining notice in 2007, and she still sounds far beyond her years on her addictive third album, "A Creature I Don't Know. " Marling, who is occasionally reminiscent of Joni Mitchell, sounds lovely backed by banjo, brushed percussion and strings, but it's when she gets a little more sinister on electric-backed songs such as "The Beast" that she really shines. The Ford Amphitheatre, 2580 Cahuenga Blvd.
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NEWS
July 26, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Joni Mitchell is following the lead of Paul McCartney in joining with the coffee giant Starbucks to release her next album. Hear Music, a record label formed in partnership with Starbucks Corp. and the Concord Music Group, said that Mitchell is its second signing. "Shine," her first album of new compositions since 1998, will be released Sept. 25.
FOOD
October 14, 2011 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Rock 'n' roll is to the Kibitz Room at Canter's what onions are to chopped liver. The two have been closely aligned since the little bar opened just off the beloved Fairfax Avenue deli's annex dining room in 1961. Only now, instead of a bunch of hippies and musicians like Frank Zappa and Jim Morrison hanging out there for the cheap booze and meaty sandwiches, you'll find a bunch of hipsters and indie rock musicians hanging out there for the cheap booze and meaty sandwiches. So things have changed, but not that much.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
An eclectic group will assemble onstage Wednesday night at the Hollywood Bowl to riff on the work of Joni Mitchell. Oddly, one thing many of these artists — who range from jazz to folk to indie rock — have in common is that they arrived late to the music of the flaxen-haired troubadour. "I didn't really pay much attention to anyone from rock 'n' roll, pop, folk, once I started to play jazz," says Herbie Hancock, Los Angeles Philharmonic creative chair for jazz, who was classically trained before taking up jazz piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1995 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
How many times have you heard pop music fans from the '60s and '70s cite a master songwriter like Joni Mitchell and complain that no one writes like that anymore? It is nonsense, of course. Though some of those same fans may not have noticed, Mitchell is still here and still writing marvelous songs about love and longing, honor and corruption.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2000 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
There's something endearing about the "TNT Master Series," a show that periodically brings together some of today's most accomplished musicians in concert to salute pop masters. For starters, the producers have shown good judgment in defining the term "master," devoting previous installments to Burt Bacharach, Johnny Cash and the late Bob Marley. And the latest choice is equally distinguished: Joni Mitchell.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2007 | Charles J. Gans, Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Herbie Hancock admits he would get so wrapped up in the music itself that he never paid any attention to the lyrics when interpreting songs, even on his Grammy-winning album "Gershwin's World." But the jazz pianist's outlook changed when he recorded an album of songs by Joni Mitchell, his old friend who shares his penchant for genre-bending musical adventures.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2001 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Filmmaker Allison Anders paid homage to one of the female titans of '60s and '70s pop music with her 1996 movie "Grace of My Heart," loosely based in part on the life of Carole King. Now Anders is making a film about one of the other woman pillars of that time: Joni Mitchell. The singer-songwriter has hired Anders to make a documentary of her recording new versions of some of her songs with a full orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2002 | DON HECKMAN
Despite critical raves and a following of dedicated fans, Patricia Barber has not broken through to the level of public awareness achieved by such shooting stars as Diana Krall, Norah Jones and Jane Monheit. It's unlikely that she is overly concerned about the more visible competition, or that she would in any way diminish what she has to say to reach a larger audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
An eclectic group will assemble onstage Wednesday night at the Hollywood Bowl to riff on the work of Joni Mitchell. Oddly, one thing many of these artists — who range from jazz to folk to indie rock — have in common is that they arrived late to the music of the flaxen-haired troubadour. "I didn't really pay much attention to anyone from rock 'n' roll, pop, folk, once I started to play jazz," says Herbie Hancock, Los Angeles Philharmonic creative chair for jazz, who was classically trained before taking up jazz piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2010 | By Matt Diehl, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"People used to say nobody can sing my songs but me — they're too personal," Joni Mitchell explained last week during a rare interview. Apparently, nobody told John Kelly not to try adapting her songs. The renowned Obie Award-winning actor and performance artist has been belting out Mitchell's songs for more than 20 years. This weekend, the New York-based Kelly concludes the L.A. run of his acclaimed solo tribute to the iconic, iconoclastic singer-songwriter, "Paved Paradise: The Art of Joni Mitchell," at Renberg Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2010 | By Shauna Snow-Capparelli
Twenty toned and lithe dancers shook their hips in exaggerated movements, pounding Dodger blue baseball bats into the ballet studio floor in time to the staccato beats of Elton John's "Bennie and the Jets." "You're giving me hips, but you're giving me ballet hips. I want jazz hips," said the energetic choreographer, orchestrating his troupe. "Make a caricature out of it. . . . How much chin can you give me? It's gotta be tight -- think Rockettes, almost. Tight, tight, tight! "Listen!
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2009 | Chris Daley, Daley is a Los Angeles-based writer.
When Joni Mitchell thinks about confession, two things come to mind: witch hunts and Catholic priests. To be held up as the exemplar of confessional songwriting is not her preference. This comes through clearly in Michelle Mercer's study "Will You Take Me as I Am: Joni Mitchell's Blue Period," considering Mitchell's career from the release of her album "Blue" in 1971 through the 1976 release of "Hejira."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Frank C. Ashby Jr., who cultivated a niche as a real estate appraiser to the stars, died Monday of Alzheimer's disease at a Las Vegas nursing home, said his daughter, Pamela Romano. He was 76. Soon after Ashby established his Los Angeles appraisal company in 1965, Charlton Heston reportedly became his first celebrity client.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2008 | Don Heckman
HERBIE HANCOCK'S performance at the Playboy Jazz Festival on Sunday comes in the midst of a bountiful year. Yes, the veteran jazz pianist/composer's Hollywood Hills home glistens with the an impressive collection of Grammys, an Oscar and other awards. But Hancock has never received a statuette with as much cachet as the Album of the Year Grammy he got on Feb. 10 for his recording, "River: The Joni Letters." On Sunday, his Playboy Jazz set will feature numbers from Hancock's acclaimed album, as well as a rare live rendering of his 1983 hit, "Rockit," and guest appearances by singers Sonya Kitchell and Amy Keys, bassist Marcus Miller and DJ C-Minus.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1991 | ROBERT HILBURN
Most of the videos in this 45-minute collection (chiefly involving songs from this year's "Night Ride Home" album) are fairly conventional. But "Dancin' Clown" is a delight because it breaks from the acclaimed singer-songwriter's usual introspection and finds her in a playful and disarming mood. In the video, Mitchell dances around the kitchen, sometimes with a favorite kitten, other times strumming a broom as if it were a guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN
"When I thought life had some meaning / Then I thought I had some choice . . . / And I made some value judgments / In a self-important voice," Mitchell sings in one of her new numbers, perhaps speaking for a burned-out generation of angry activists and cynics: "All we ever wanted was to come in from the cold." Fans may well take this verse as an explanation--if not an apology--for the caustic, combative social commentary that characterized much of Mitchell's work over the last decade.
BOOKS
May 25, 2008 | Leslie Brody, Leslie Brody is writing a biography of Jessica Mitford.
Sisterhood -- in the family and body politic -- can be a beautiful abstraction and a real pain in the neck. It's an evanescent ideal that sometimes takes shape in historic movements. And it's the cosmic force behind Sheila Weller as she tries to link the lives of three very different artists to "the rich composite story of a whole generation of women born middle-class in the early to mid 1940s and coming of age in the middle to late 1960s."
IMAGE
April 20, 2008 | Melissa Magsaysay, Times Staff Writer
The SPRING COLLECTIONS were so full of trembling blossoms and tropical blooms, the runways were like Impressionist galleries in motion. These were the masterpieces of the season -- floral prints without hard edges, saturated with color, in soft, fluid shapes.
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