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Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center

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NEWS
July 23, 1987
An exhibition by artist Tim Carmody will be sponsored by Art That Heals through Sept. 4, in the Bowyer Oncology Clinic Gallery at UCLA Medical Center. The gallery, on the eighth floor of the Louis Factor Building, will be open to the public from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays. Art That Heals, a component of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, is sponsoring the event as part of its program for artists who have had cancer.
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NEWS
July 29, 2010
UCLA researchers reported Thursday that they have discovered the identity of the prostate cell that goes awry to produce cancer, a finding that could lead to new approaches to prevention and treatment of this common plague of men. Most researchers had previously believed that prostate tumors originated in the so-called luminal cells because tumor cells look like luminal cells. But immunologist Owen N. Witte of UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and his colleagues have found that it actually arises in basal cells, a more stem cell-like component of the gland.
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HEALTH
June 2, 2008
Childhood cancer: In a May 26 article on survivors of childhood cancer, Dr. Jacqueline Casillas was referred to as director of the UCLA-Livestrong Survivorship Center of Excellence. She is associate director; the director is Dr. Patricia Ganz. The article said the UCLA-Livestrong center was in the Mattel Children's Hospital. It is part of UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. The same article said that a study of childhood cancer survivors that found a five to 10 times greater risk of heart disease in early adulthood (compared with healthy siblings)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2010 | Times Staff Reports
Kenneth Alan Jonsson, an entrepreneur and philanthropist who co-founded the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, died March 15 at his home in Pacific Palisades. He had been in declining health for several months after a hospital stay in December, his family said. He was 79. Jonsson, the son of Texas Instruments co-founder John Erik Jonsson, and his late wife, Diana, were longtime supporters of cancer research. In 1975, the Jonssons donated $1 million to UCLA for a new cancer research center to be named for the family.
NEWS
April 26, 1989
U.S. cancer researchers announced a joint cancer study with the Soviet Union. Scientists from the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston said the study--three separate clinical trials--will be the first of its kind. It will involve carefully monitored trials of new therapies on several hundred Soviet and American patients over two years, said Dr. Emil Frei III, director of the Dana-Farber institute, which is affiliated with Harvard Medical School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1991
As one of the individuals quoted in Claire Spiegel's article regarding UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center ("Top Cancer Scientists Leaving UCLA Center," Part B, April 29), I am concerned about some omissions from the article, a few of which have caused needless concerns for some of our patients at UCLA. People sometimes need denominators. The article may not have provided the reader sufficient perspective to permit a balanced and accurate interpretation of the facts. For instance, the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA has 320 faculty members (including 104 clinical oncologists)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1991
Stop Cancer, a volunteer research support group, Monday announced the establishment of $150,000 in grants for outstanding researchers at the comprehensive cancer centers at USC and UCLA in Los Angeles. The Research Career Development Awards will be provided to selected researchers at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA and the Kenneth Norris Jr. Comprehensive Cancer Center at USC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2006 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Diana Gordon Jonsson, who with her husband, Kenneth, helped found the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, died April 28. She was 76. Jonsson, a docent at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, collapsed as she was leading a museum tour and was taken to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where she was pronounced dead, her husband said. The exact cause of death was not known. Born Diana Gordon in Pittsburgh, she graduated from Wellesley College as a political science major.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1996 | From a Times Staff Writer
Patricia Ganz, a director at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center in Westwood, has received a $100,000 award for her research on how breast cancer affects the lives of women. Ganz's research examined how women treated for breast cancer fared in the months after a mastectomy or lumpectomy. While traditional research focused on determining the most medically effective treatment, Ganz asked women about their quality of life. The survival rate for both methods of treatment is equal.
HEALTH
March 22, 2010 | By Devon Schuyler, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Packing on the pounds gets a well-deserved bad rap. Most Americans understand that excess weight contributes to heart disease and diabetes, not to mention the urge to hide behind the kids in family photos. But obesity as a risk factor for cancer? That seems to be the case. An increasing number of studies are finding that overweight and obese people are more likely to develop cancer of various kinds. At least half a dozen types of cancer are believed to be directly affected by weight.
SCIENCE
February 17, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Women who take aspirin regularly after their breast cancer goes into remission are about 50% less likely to suffer a recurrence or to die from the disease, according to new findings from the ongoing Nurses' Health Study. The results, reported Tuesday in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, are surprising because at least five large studies have shown that taking aspirin regularly has no effect on the risk of developing breast cancer in the first place. The study's authors described the findings as surprising and worthy of follow-up, but even they cautioned that survivors shouldn't yet begin prophylactic aspirin use. The new results could be because the process of metastasis of breast cancer is different than that of initiation and could thus be susceptible to influence by aspirin.
HEALTH
June 2, 2008
Childhood cancer: In a May 26 article on survivors of childhood cancer, Dr. Jacqueline Casillas was referred to as director of the UCLA-Livestrong Survivorship Center of Excellence. She is associate director; the director is Dr. Patricia Ganz. The article said the UCLA-Livestrong center was in the Mattel Children's Hospital. It is part of UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. The same article said that a study of childhood cancer survivors that found a five to 10 times greater risk of heart disease in early adulthood (compared with healthy siblings)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2006 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Diana Gordon Jonsson, who with her husband, Kenneth, helped found the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, died April 28. She was 76. Jonsson, a docent at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, collapsed as she was leading a museum tour and was taken to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where she was pronounced dead, her husband said. The exact cause of death was not known. Born Diana Gordon in Pittsburgh, she graduated from Wellesley College as a political science major.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1997 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Making it easier for cancer patients to receive treatment, a handful of Ventura County doctors today will begin new partnerships with UCLA's cancer center, plugging into a network of more than 300 specialists and speeding cutting-edge treatments to county residents. Selected physicians in Thousand Oaks, Simi Valley, Ventura and Oxnard will now have access to the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, a move that for the first time will allow patients to undergo the center's experimental cancer treatments without leaving the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2010 | Times Staff Reports
Kenneth Alan Jonsson, an entrepreneur and philanthropist who co-founded the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, died March 15 at his home in Pacific Palisades. He had been in declining health for several months after a hospital stay in December, his family said. He was 79. Jonsson, the son of Texas Instruments co-founder John Erik Jonsson, and his late wife, Diana, were longtime supporters of cancer research. In 1975, the Jonssons donated $1 million to UCLA for a new cancer research center to be named for the family.
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