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NEWS
March 10, 2010 | By BY ANDY KLEIN
The explosion of South Korean cinema in the last decade or so has been extraordinary to watch. Not long after the vibrant Hong Kong industry started losing its momentum, Korea began to take up the slack. Extraordinary filmmakers such as Park Chan-wook ("Oldboy"), Kim Ji-woon ("A Tale of Two Sisters") and Kim Ki-duk ("3-Iron") developed reputations. Bong Joon-ho, whose fourth film, "Mother," opens in L.A. this week, is one of the best South Korean directors and arguably the most accessible to U.S. audiences.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | Oliver Gettell
"Snowpiercer," South Korean filmmaker Bong Joon-ho's post-apocalyptic sci-fi film set aboard a speeding train, is to open the 20th annual Los Angeles Film Festival, which runs June 11-19. Starring Chris Evans, Jamie Bell and Tilda Swinton, "Snowpiercer" is set in a world where a failed global-warming experiment has killed off most life on the planet, and the final survivors reside aboard a train that travels around the frozen globe via a perpetual-motion engine. Incited by cryptic messages, the oppressed passengers in the rear section of the train revolt against the elites upfront.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | Oliver Gettell
"Snowpiercer," South Korean filmmaker Bong Joon-ho's post-apocalyptic sci-fi film set aboard a speeding train, is to open the 20th annual Los Angeles Film Festival, which runs June 11-19. Starring Chris Evans, Jamie Bell and Tilda Swinton, "Snowpiercer" is set in a world where a failed global-warming experiment has killed off most life on the planet, and the final survivors reside aboard a train that travels around the frozen globe via a perpetual-motion engine. Incited by cryptic messages, the oppressed passengers in the rear section of the train revolt against the elites upfront.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2010 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
One of the most successful directors in South Korea and one of the best-known Korean directors internationally, Bong Joon-ho is the rare filmmaker who seems to work both within and beyond the confines of genre. His brisk, funny, extremely well-made movies deliver the familiar pleasures of pop entertainment, though often in unfamiliar configurations. Bong has made four features (and a handful of shorts) and has been intriguingly hard to pin down from film to film. He made his debut in 2000 with "Barking Dogs Never Bite," a portrait of big-city anomie centered on an anonymous Seoul apartment complex, then followed it with "Memories of Murder" (2003)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2010 | By Susan King
Monsters come in all shapes and guises in the cinematic universe of South Korean director Bong Joon-ho. In his 2003 film "Memories of Murder," the monster was a serial killer whose murders were never solved by the police. In his acclaimed 2006 "The Host," which holds the record for Korean box-office admissions, the demon was quite literally a savage monster that came from the Han River in the middle of Seoul to feast on the metropolis. And in his latest film, "Mother," which opened Friday, the monster is a single mother who goes to any lengths to prove that her mentally challenged 27-year-old son didn't murder a promiscuous teenage girl.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2010 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
One of the most successful directors in South Korea and one of the best-known Korean directors internationally, Bong Joon-ho is the rare filmmaker who seems to work both within and beyond the confines of genre. His brisk, funny, extremely well-made movies deliver the familiar pleasures of pop entertainment, though often in unfamiliar configurations. Bong has made four features (and a handful of shorts) and has been intriguingly hard to pin down from film to film. He made his debut in 2000 with "Barking Dogs Never Bite," a portrait of big-city anomie centered on an anonymous Seoul apartment complex, then followed it with "Memories of Murder" (2003)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2009 | By Susan King
The American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre celebrates the 94th birthday of the late, great Frank Sinatra with a swinging double bill tonight: 1960's " Ocean's 11" -- the first Rat Pack funfest -- which also stars Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., Peter Lawford, Joey Bishop, Cesar Romero and Angie Dickinson; and 1957's Rodgers and Hart musical "Pal Joey" with Rita Hayworth and Kim Novak. The latter played at the Egyptian when it was first released. In keeping with the Rat Pack spirit, there'll also be a no-host martini bar reception before the screenings.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2007 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
A monster movie for the 21st century, "The Host" takes familiar genre elements and then crushes them in much the same way the title creature runs amok along the Seoul riverbank it calls home. Written and directed by South Korean filmmaker Bong Joon-ho, it's a film that will catch you leaning in one direction and abruptly pull you in another, all the while building to a surprisingly emotional climax. On a U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009 | Susan King
A woman who transforms into an inanimate object. A wild man who emerges from the sewers, terrorizing citizens on the street. An agoraphobic who is so enamored with a pizza delivery girl he decides to leave the house to find her. These off-kilter tales make up what is being described as a surreal triptych movie, "Tokyo!," opening Friday at the Nuart Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2009 | From A Times Staff Writer
New movies from Werner Herzog, Claude Chabrol and Ken Loach will be screened at AFI Fest 2009, organizers said Wednesday. The film festival will run from Oct. 30 to Nov. 7 in Hollywood and Santa Monica. Among the first dozen films unveiled were Herzog's "The Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans," with Nicolas Cage, Eva Mendes and Val Kilmer; Chabrol's "Bellamy," a mystery with Gerard Depardieu; and Loach's "Looking for Eric," about a soccer fanatic. Also being shown are Lee Daniels' "Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire," starring newcomer Gabourey Sidibe as a pregnant teenager in 1980s Harlem, and Bong Joon-ho's "Mother," a thriller from South Korea.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2010 | By Susan King
Monsters come in all shapes and guises in the cinematic universe of South Korean director Bong Joon-ho. In his 2003 film "Memories of Murder," the monster was a serial killer whose murders were never solved by the police. In his acclaimed 2006 "The Host," which holds the record for Korean box-office admissions, the demon was quite literally a savage monster that came from the Han River in the middle of Seoul to feast on the metropolis. And in his latest film, "Mother," which opened Friday, the monster is a single mother who goes to any lengths to prove that her mentally challenged 27-year-old son didn't murder a promiscuous teenage girl.
NEWS
March 10, 2010 | By BY ANDY KLEIN
The explosion of South Korean cinema in the last decade or so has been extraordinary to watch. Not long after the vibrant Hong Kong industry started losing its momentum, Korea began to take up the slack. Extraordinary filmmakers such as Park Chan-wook ("Oldboy"), Kim Ji-woon ("A Tale of Two Sisters") and Kim Ki-duk ("3-Iron") developed reputations. Bong Joon-ho, whose fourth film, "Mother," opens in L.A. this week, is one of the best South Korean directors and arguably the most accessible to U.S. audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2009 | By Susan King
The American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre celebrates the 94th birthday of the late, great Frank Sinatra with a swinging double bill tonight: 1960's " Ocean's 11" -- the first Rat Pack funfest -- which also stars Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., Peter Lawford, Joey Bishop, Cesar Romero and Angie Dickinson; and 1957's Rodgers and Hart musical "Pal Joey" with Rita Hayworth and Kim Novak. The latter played at the Egyptian when it was first released. In keeping with the Rat Pack spirit, there'll also be a no-host martini bar reception before the screenings.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009 | Susan King
A woman who transforms into an inanimate object. A wild man who emerges from the sewers, terrorizing citizens on the street. An agoraphobic who is so enamored with a pizza delivery girl he decides to leave the house to find her. These off-kilter tales make up what is being described as a surreal triptych movie, "Tokyo!," opening Friday at the Nuart Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2007 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
A monster movie for the 21st century, "The Host" takes familiar genre elements and then crushes them in much the same way the title creature runs amok along the Seoul riverbank it calls home. Written and directed by South Korean filmmaker Bong Joon-ho, it's a film that will catch you leaning in one direction and abruptly pull you in another, all the while building to a surprisingly emotional climax. On a U.S.
NEWS
March 21, 2010
Fountain maker: An article in the March 14 Business section about Mark Fuller said his project for the Bellagio hotel in Las Vegas amounted to $2.7 million. His firm's contract was for $27 million. Trees for veterans: An article in the March 14 Section A about a tree-planting program to honor veterans described Frankie Sanchez as a Vietnam War veteran. Sanchez served in the Army during the Vietnam War era but never deployed to Vietnam. Dana Davis: An article in today's Image section about shoemaker Dana Davis identifies her mother as Nancy Davis.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2008 | Susan King
Baby boomers know Otto Preminger, right, as the bald Mr. Freeze on the old "Batman" TV series and as William Holden's nemesis in "Stalag 17," but his acting took a back seat to his long career as a director and producer who was a staunch advocate of free speech, tackling topics such as homosexuality, rape and drug addiction in his films. "He was the gadfly of American cinema," says Drew Casper, a professor at USC's School of Cinematic Arts. "He educated American audiences."
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