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NEWS
November 28, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
King Hussein told the new Parliament in Amman that he will legalize political parties and relax martial law, opening the way to more freedom in Jordan after the first national elections in 22 years. "There is no doubt the current National Assembly represents a new phase in our life," Hussein said. Political parties have been banned for 33 years in Jordan after a coup attempt, and martial law has been in force for 22 years, since the Arab-Israeli War of 1967.
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WORLD
September 17, 2004 | From Reuters
U.S. ally Jordan put on trial Thursday a Muslim militant accused of having been recruited by suspected Al Qaeda associate Abu Musab Zarqawi to bankroll deadly attacks, including suicide bombings in Iraq. Bilal Mansour Hiyari, 34, who comes from a prominent Jordanian tribe, faces two charges of conspiracy with "intent to engage in terrorist acts" and "financing and collecting donations for an illegal group." The conspiracy charge alone carries the death sentence.
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WORLD
September 17, 2004 | From Reuters
U.S. ally Jordan put on trial Thursday a Muslim militant accused of having been recruited by suspected Al Qaeda associate Abu Musab Zarqawi to bankroll deadly attacks, including suicide bombings in Iraq. Bilal Mansour Hiyari, 34, who comes from a prominent Jordanian tribe, faces two charges of conspiracy with "intent to engage in terrorist acts" and "financing and collecting donations for an illegal group." The conspiracy charge alone carries the death sentence.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
King Hussein told the new Parliament in Amman that he will legalize political parties and relax martial law, opening the way to more freedom in Jordan after the first national elections in 22 years. "There is no doubt the current National Assembly represents a new phase in our life," Hussein said. Political parties have been banned for 33 years in Jordan after a coup attempt, and martial law has been in force for 22 years, since the Arab-Israeli War of 1967.
NEWS
March 12, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day Mohammed A. Salameh went away to the University of Jordan to study Islamic law, his father remembers, he became different. Before, he said, his son had one interest: "Football. Football. Football," using the local term for the game of soccer. Then, he said his son began staying away from the neighborhood soccer games, retreating to his room and memorizing six of the Koran's 30 chapters. The young man also grew more regular about his ritual daily prayers.
NEWS
November 9, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past 10 days, Toujan Faisal had sat before packed hotel ballrooms, trade union halls and private living rooms throughout the conservative Jordanian capital, justifying her marriage, her honor, her work and, mostly, her one-woman political crusade against a regional tide of Islamic fundamentalism. No, Faisal found herself telling prospective voters time and again last week, she does not advocate female polygamy--multiple husbands for women--as the fundamentalists have charged.
NEWS
May 11, 2003 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
Hailed by some in the Pentagon as a pro-American visionary and an emerging leader of the new Iraq, Ahmad Chalabi evokes quite a different response in Jordan, where he spent 12 years and left behind economic chaos, a court conviction on numerous financial charges -- and a lengthy prison term he never served. The Iraqi dissident's sojourn here engendered a complex web of ambition, money and political intrigue.
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