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NEWS
February 10, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The newly widowed queen of Jordan threw open the doors of Zahran Palace on Tuesday to accept the outstretched hands and tearful embraces of thousands of women who lined up to share their common grief. Queen Noor al Hussein--"Light of Hussein"--had just lost her husband, the king of Jordan, yet it was she who consoled the women who came calling. "We rejoice in his life," she said to one visitor. "His spirit makes us strong."
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NEWS
February 10, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The newly widowed queen of Jordan threw open the doors of Zahran Palace on Tuesday to accept the outstretched hands and tearful embraces of thousands of women who lined up to share their common grief. Queen Noor al Hussein--"Light of Hussein"--had just lost her husband, the king of Jordan, yet it was she who consoled the women who came calling. "We rejoice in his life," she said to one visitor. "His spirit makes us strong."
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NEWS
August 23, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The reporters were too busy scribbling in their small note pads to notice that the pilot of the little glass-bottom boat was steering them to an unscheduled stop. The pair had hired the boat, not to gaze at the elaborate coral formations in the bay, but rather to look at two blockade-busting Iraqi ships at anchor in Aqaba's port. Their note-taking apparently made the pilot nervous--and he suddenly decided to turn them in as spies to soldiers patrolling a nearby beach.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Jordan's small size--its population is perhaps 3.4 million--belies its importance in the geopolitics of the Middle East. That became clear during the Gulf War when King Hussein angered many Americans and a lot of other people by remaining neutral. Jordan observed United Nations sanctions against Iraq--its main trading partner--but did not join the coalition forces in the Gulf. Members of the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Jordan's small size--its population is perhaps 3.4 million--belies its importance in the geopolitics of the Middle East. That became clear during the Gulf War when King Hussein angered many Americans and a lot of other people by remaining neutral. Jordan observed United Nations sanctions against Iraq--its main trading partner--but did not join the coalition forces in the Gulf. Members of the U.S.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jordanians often express frustration over Westerners' lack of understanding of Arab attitudes, but the reaction here to Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's televised appearance with a group of Western hostages shows that the path of misunderstanding is a two-way street. On Friday, many Jordanians expressed disbelief that Westerners were horrified by Hussein's use of detained children to convey a benign image to the world.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Under towering sandstone cliffs on the edge of a starkly beautiful expanse of desert, Mohammed Utayyiq Zalabia has built a house of concrete blocks. Similar to dozens of new structures that now dot the sandy landscape here, the two-room house has no windows, no roof, not even any furniture on the rough concrete floor. Zalabia and his family still prefer to live in the brown and white goat's-hair tent anchored nearby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1988
Your editorial "Repression in Jordan" (May 3), branding Jordan as a "repressive society" simply because its government decided to withdraw the press credentials of the NBC correspondent in Amman, is totally unwarranted. The measure was an isolated action, the first of its kind taken by the Jordanian authorities against a foreign correspondent--and decided upon only after several incidents had left them with no other choice. To convey, without valid reason, such a negative image of Jordan to your readers is a most regrettable distortion of reality.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jordanians often express frustration over Westerners' lack of understanding of Arab attitudes, but the reaction here to Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's televised appearance with a group of Western hostages shows that the path of misunderstanding is a two-way street. On Friday, many Jordanians expressed disbelief that Westerners were horrified by Hussein's use of detained children to convey a benign image to the world.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The reporters were too busy scribbling in their small note pads to notice that the pilot of the little glass-bottom boat was steering them to an unscheduled stop. The pair had hired the boat, not to gaze at the elaborate coral formations in the bay, but rather to look at two blockade-busting Iraqi ships at anchor in Aqaba's port. Their note-taking apparently made the pilot nervous--and he suddenly decided to turn them in as spies to soldiers patrolling a nearby beach.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Under towering sandstone cliffs on the edge of a starkly beautiful expanse of desert, Mohammed Utayyiq Zalabia has built a house of concrete blocks. Similar to dozens of new structures that now dot the sandy landscape here, the two-room house has no windows, no roof, not even any furniture on the rough concrete floor. Zalabia and his family still prefer to live in the brown and white goat's-hair tent anchored nearby.
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