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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1996 | PETER Y. HONG and LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Juan Zuniga's daughter, three young grandchildren and mother-in-law died in the 1,200-degree heat of a second-floor bedroom when three vengeful drug addicts poured gasoline through the family's mail slot and set their apartment ablaze. More than four years after the 1991 fire at the Jordan Downs housing project in Watts, two of the arsonists are locked up for life and Zuniga, 68, and his family have moved to public housing on the Eastside.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2014 | By Kurt Streeter
Officers Keith Linton and Otis Swift stopped their patrol car, rolled down a window and motioned to a hoodie-wearing teenager. In this part of South L.A., such encounters can be tense - or worse. "Hey, Linton. Hey, Swift," the teen said. "How y'all doing?" "Doing good, my man," Linton replied, launching into a conversation about basketball. Similar scenes played out all afternoon as the cops worked their beat in Jordan Downs, a housing project in Watts with a violent reputation and a history of ill will between residents and police.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2014 | By Kurt Streeter
Officers Keith Linton and Otis Swift stopped their patrol car, rolled down a window and motioned to a hoodie-wearing teenager. In this part of South L.A., such encounters can be tense - or worse. "Hey, Linton. Hey, Swift," the teen said. "How y'all doing?" "Doing good, my man," Linton replied, launching into a conversation about basketball. Similar scenes played out all afternoon as the cops worked their beat in Jordan Downs, a housing project in Watts with a violent reputation and a history of ill will between residents and police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2011 | By Ching-Ching Ni and Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles police Thursday identified a 56-year-old grandmother who was killed by officers in Watts after she allegedly tried to shoot relatives and failed to drop her weapon. Brenda Williams was struck by rounds fired by three Los Angeles Police Department officers Wednesday night near the Jordan Downs housing project. She was one of three people in officer-involved shootings — two of them deadly — in less than 24 hours. Neighbors said Williams recently moved into the neighborhood in the 10000 block of Anzac Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz and Jessica Garrison
Los Angeles officials are embarking on a $1-billion plan to tear down the notorious Jordan Downs housing project and turn it into a "new urban village" -- an effort aimed at transforming the Watts neighborhood that would be one of the city's largest public works projects. The city wants to replace the project's 700 dilapidated units, which were built more than half a century ago, with taller "mixed-use" buildings that would house not just low-income residents but also those paying market rates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2007 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles city leaders Friday touted the installation of seven surveillance cameras at the Jordan Downs housing project, saying the high-tech equipment already has played a role in making the Watts complex safer. The cameras, mounted on utility polls, beam images to three police units in the area, allowing officers to keep a constant eye on activity and respond more quickly to incidents, police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2005 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
The Jordan Downs housing project is one of Los Angeles' most dangerous and blighted communities, with a high crime rate and residents too poor to purchase computers, let alone Internet service. Los Angeles police have a plan to attack both the digital divide and the violence. By year's end, the Los Angeles Police Department intends to place at least a dozen surveillance cameras inside the 700-unit, World War II-era complex and along connecting streets to Jordan High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1993 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rejecting the death penalty, a jury recommended that two men serve life terms without the possibility of parole for setting a fire that killed a great-grandmother, her granddaughter and the granddaughter's three small children. The prosecutor had argued passionately for the death penalty against Harold Mangram, 48, and Victor Spencer, 38, in the arson two years ago at the Jordan Downs housing project in Watts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2011 | By Ching-Ching Ni and Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles police Thursday identified a 56-year-old grandmother who was killed by officers in Watts after she allegedly tried to shoot relatives and failed to drop her weapon. Brenda Williams was struck by rounds fired by three Los Angeles Police Department officers Wednesday night near the Jordan Downs housing project. She was one of three people in officer-involved shootings — two of them deadly — in less than 24 hours. Neighbors said Williams recently moved into the neighborhood in the 10000 block of Anzac Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1993
Los Angeles police were placed on a brief tactical alter Tuesday night after a pickup basketball game at the Jordan Down housing project degenerated into gunfire. Detective William Smith of the Police Department's Southeast Division said that passing squad cars were fired upon and that rocks and bottles were thrown, but there were no injuries or arrests in the 9:30 p.m. incident. Smith said officers had come to break up a basketball game between rival gangs that had resulted in violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz and Jessica Garrison
Los Angeles officials are embarking on a $1-billion plan to tear down the notorious Jordan Downs housing project and turn it into a "new urban village" -- an effort aimed at transforming the Watts neighborhood that would be one of the city's largest public works projects. The city wants to replace the project's 700 dilapidated units, which were built more than half a century ago, with taller "mixed-use" buildings that would house not just low-income residents but also those paying market rates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2007 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles city leaders Friday touted the installation of seven surveillance cameras at the Jordan Downs housing project, saying the high-tech equipment already has played a role in making the Watts complex safer. The cameras, mounted on utility polls, beam images to three police units in the area, allowing officers to keep a constant eye on activity and respond more quickly to incidents, police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2005 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
The Jordan Downs housing project is one of Los Angeles' most dangerous and blighted communities, with a high crime rate and residents too poor to purchase computers, let alone Internet service. Los Angeles police have a plan to attack both the digital divide and the violence. By year's end, the Los Angeles Police Department intends to place at least a dozen surveillance cameras inside the 700-unit, World War II-era complex and along connecting streets to Jordan High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1996 | PETER Y. HONG and LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Juan Zuniga's daughter, three young grandchildren and mother-in-law died in the 1,200-degree heat of a second-floor bedroom when three vengeful drug addicts poured gasoline through the family's mail slot and set their apartment ablaze. More than four years after the 1991 fire at the Jordan Downs housing project in Watts, two of the arsonists are locked up for life and Zuniga, 68, and his family have moved to public housing on the Eastside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1993 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rejecting the death penalty, a jury recommended that two men serve life terms without the possibility of parole for setting a fire that killed a great-grandmother, her granddaughter and the granddaughter's three small children. The prosecutor had argued passionately for the death penalty against Harold Mangram, 48, and Victor Spencer, 38, in the arson two years ago at the Jordan Downs housing project in Watts.
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