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Jordan Downs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison and Kurt Streeter
Plans for the revitalization of the Jordan Downs housing project in Watts have been thrown into disarray after Los Angeles officials learned Monday that the city will not be awarded a $30-million federal grant they had been counting on for the development. For years, officials have been touting their plan to spend more than $700 million to transform the derelict and often dangerous housing project into a mixed-income community of up to 1,800 stylish new apartments, along with chain stores and new streetscapes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty, according to records and interviews. An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed. LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.
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OPINION
July 25, 2012
The redevelopment of the infamously grim Jordan Downs housing project in Watts moved one step closer to reality with the announcement last month that the Housing Authority of the city of Los Angeles had selected two developers to map out and execute a plan for a new community. Not that anyone should pack their bags yet, either to move out of the barracks-like 700-unit structure or to move into the envisioned urban village of subsidized housing, market-rate apartments and retail stores that would replace it. The list of further steps that must be taken is long and challenging.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison and Kurt Streeter
Plans for the revitalization of the Jordan Downs housing project in Watts have been thrown into disarray after Los Angeles officials learned Monday that the city will not be awarded a $30-million federal grant they had been counting on for the development. For years, officials have been touting their plan to spend upward of $700 million to transform the derelict and often dangerous housing project into a mixed-income community of up to 1,800 stylish new apartments, along with chain stores and new streetscapes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2013 | By Tony Barboza and Jessica Garrison
As if the task of transforming one of the city's most notorious housing projects into a new "urban village" wasn't daunting enough, Los Angeles has run into another hurdle in the redevelopment of Jordan Downs: concerns over contaminated land. City officials earlier this year approved a plan to spend up to $1 billion to turn the often dangerous Watts housing development of 700 derelict units into a mixed-income community of up to 1,800 stylish new apartments. But the plan hinges on building the first phase of the new community on 21 acres of former industrial land that is laced with lead, arsenic, oil and cancer-causing industrial chemicals from its past use as a steel factory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Jessica Garrison
The Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to officially create an “urban village” of shops, town homes and a park and gardens to replace Jordan Downs, the notorious Watts housing project. The unanimous vote gave final approval to a series of land use and planning laws four years in the drafting. The move clears the way for an up to $1-billion transformation of one of the city's most poverty-stricken and violent areas. The idea is to turn the often-dangerous and derelict housing development, built in the 1940s and '50s, into a mixed-income community of up to 1,400 stylish new apartments, along with chain stores and new streetscapes, all designed to attract people of greater means to move into the area and live alongside the city's poorest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison and Kurt Streeter
Plans for the revitalization of the Jordan Downs housing project in Watts have been thrown into disarray after Los Angeles officials learned Monday that the city will not be awarded a $30-million federal grant they had been counting on for the development. For years, officials have been touting their plan to spend upward of $700 million to transform the derelict and often dangerous housing project into a mixed-income community of up to 1,800 stylish new apartments, along with chain stores and new streetscapes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2009 | Ruben Vives
About 40 tenants at the Jordan Downs public housing project gathered Saturday to hear about city plans that could dramatically change their lives -- a proposal to tear down the tarnished Watts complex and replace it with a modern "urban village" with apartments, stores and restaurants. Residents met at the Jordan Downs recreation center to hear about the ambitious, $1-billion proposal that could include as many as 2,100 units, with both low-income and market-rate housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1991
Was I mistaken, or did I see yet another group seeking segregated housing? ("Segregated Housing Sought at Jordan Downs," Metro, Sept. 10). Here we go again: Not all African-Americans are arsonists and murderers. The one neighbor who, reportedly, tried to help the Zuniga family, and who might be the only individual able to provide an eyewitness account, is black. I had hoped we were done with this madness. There is already segregated housing for individuals who commit unspeakable crimes like burning people alive in their homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1989
In theory the proposal to sell the Jordan Downs housing project in Watts to private developers sounds good. Developers would buy the deteriorating public housing in exchange for lucrative tax credits. The housing authority would get millions for a new rent-subsidy program for poor people. But in practice the rundown apartments would be a hard sell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison and Kurt Streeter
Plans for the revitalization of the Jordan Downs housing project in Watts have been thrown into disarray after Los Angeles officials learned Monday that the city will not be awarded a $30-million federal grant they had been counting on for the development. For years, officials have been touting their plan to spend more than $700 million to transform the derelict and often dangerous housing project into a mixed-income community of up to 1,800 stylish new apartments, along with chain stores and new streetscapes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2014 | By Kurt Streeter
Officers Keith Linton and Otis Swift stopped their patrol car, rolled down a window and motioned to a hoodie-wearing teenager. In this part of South L.A., such encounters can be tense - or worse. "Hey, Linton. Hey, Swift," the teen said. "How y'all doing?" "Doing good, my man," Linton replied, launching into a conversation about basketball. Similar scenes played out all afternoon as the cops worked their beat in Jordan Downs, a housing project in Watts with a violent reputation and a history of ill will between residents and police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2013 | By Tony Barboza and Jessica Garrison
As if the task of transforming one of the city's most notorious housing projects into a new "urban village" wasn't daunting enough, Los Angeles has run into another hurdle in the redevelopment of Jordan Downs: concerns over contaminated land. City officials earlier this year approved a plan to spend up to $1 billion to turn the often dangerous Watts housing development of 700 derelict units into a mixed-income community of up to 1,800 stylish new apartments. But the plan hinges on building the first phase of the new community on 21 acres of former industrial land that is laced with lead, arsenic, oil and cancer-causing industrial chemicals from its past use as a steel factory.
SPORTS
December 6, 2013 | By Broderick Turner
It appears as if defense is the first and last thing on the mind of the Clippers' DeAndre Jordan these days. “That's my job on this team, to be the last line of defense for us,” the 6-foot-11 center said. “And I have to make sure we all play defense as a team.” Jordan is averaging 2.15 blocked shots a game, sixth-best in the NBA. But it's more than just that. Jordan is active on defense and he is constantly talking, barking out the Clippers' defensive assignments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Jessica Garrison
The Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to officially create an “urban village” of shops, town homes and a park and gardens to replace Jordan Downs, the notorious Watts housing project. The unanimous vote gave final approval to a series of land use and planning laws four years in the drafting. The move clears the way for an up to $1-billion transformation of one of the city's most poverty-stricken and violent areas. The idea is to turn the often-dangerous and derelict housing development, built in the 1940s and '50s, into a mixed-income community of up to 1,400 stylish new apartments, along with chain stores and new streetscapes, all designed to attract people of greater means to move into the area and live alongside the city's poorest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Jessica Garrison
The Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to create an "urban village" of shops, town homes and a park and gardens to replace Jordan Downs, the notorious Watts housing project. The unanimous vote gave final approval to a series of land use and planning laws years in the making. The move clears the way for an up to $1-billion transformation of one of the city's most poverty-stricken and violent areas. The idea is to turn the often-dangerous housing development of 700 derelict units into a mixed-income community of up to 1,800 stylish new apartments, along with chain stores and new streetscapes - all designed to attract higher-income people to move into the area and live alongside some of the city's poorest.
NEWS
August 1, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
When Brenda Stevenson came to UCLA to teach, after studying at Yale and working at the University of Texas, Austin, she thought she knew from multicultural. But L.A. had a vast and distinctly complex ethnic weft and warp that she hadn't anticipated; she explores two threads, the Korean and African American ones, in her new book about the 1991 killing of a black teenager, “The Contested Murder of Latasha Harlins.” I spoke to her about it for my “Patt Morrison Asks” column.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
As a student at Jordan High School in Watts, Shanell Blackmon had flunked chemistry, ditched class and didn't think she would ever graduate. Along came Evan Dvorak, a 24-year-old physics teacher fresh out of college. He broke down the forbidding subject with patient explanations and fun experiments. He was inspiring: "Nothing less than your best. No excuses. " He talked Shanell out of dropping his honors class, insisting she could do the work - and she did, finishing with a B. In June, Shanell's hard work paid off when she proudly donned her blue cap and gown and walked across the stage to receive her diploma.
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