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NEWS
September 28, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdullah Nsour put plainly the woes of Jordan as seen from his city in the rocky hills northwest of Amman. "People come to me and say, 'Mr. Mayor, I'm going to be ruined,' " he said. "Our problem is poverty." Other cities are hurting more in the backwash of the trade embargo against Iraq. In the southern port of Aqaba, for instance, there are only two or three ships this week at docks with room for 16. The shock was sudden in Aqaba.
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NEWS
May 15, 1999 | Associated Press
President Clinton is urging Japan, Germany, France and other creditor nations to cancel or defer Jordan's debts to help its new young king cope with a faltering economy. King Abdullah II arrived Friday for a weeklong official visit that will include a meeting with Clinton at the White House on Tuesday and talks with Cabinet officials and members of Congress.
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NEWS
September 11, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign tourists have vanished, Red Sea dockworkers are idle and 70% of the national truck fleet is off the road. International air tickets out of Amman carry a $100 war-risk surcharge. Jordan is paying a heavy price for the international sanctions against neighboring Iraq--and is demanding help to offset it. "Our economy was pitiful before the trouble began.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton used the remarkable gathering of Middle East and world figures at King Hussein's funeral Monday for some political arm-twisting during a series of informal and chance meetings with regional leaders and other foreign dignitaries. National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger said Clinton had a series of chats with world leaders as they paid final respects to the Jordanian leader, who died Sunday of cancer.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Jordan's small size--its population is perhaps 3.4 million--belies its importance in the geopolitics of the Middle East. That became clear during the Gulf War when King Hussein angered many Americans and a lot of other people by remaining neutral. Jordan observed United Nations sanctions against Iraq--its main trading partner--but did not join the coalition forces in the Gulf. Members of the U.S.
NEWS
August 31, 1990 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jordan's ambassador to the United States declared Thursday that the Bush Administration is adding "fuel to an already troubled region" and cannot hope to arbitrate the Persian Gulf conflict as long as it supports Israel. In the sharpest public rebuff yet from a Jordanian official, Ambassador Hussein A. Hammami declared that Washington's deployment of military units in the Arab world is both unwarranted and unwanted.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States has quietly launched an international effort to stabilize Jordan's leadership in the face of fears that Iraq might try to topple the new monarch and that economic turmoil could destabilize the country's currency, U.S. officials said Saturday. The package of measures, pitched by President Clinton in a series of messages to world leaders, includes a request to Congress to free up $300 million in U.S.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The south of Iraq will become a large graveyard for every invader against this pure land." Another military communique from Baghdad? No, it was Jordanian Prime Minister Mudar Badran addressing Parliament just hours before the suspension of operations in the Persian Gulf War. Jordan's official policy during the conflict was neutrality, but its politicians, press and people wore their hearts on their sleeves. They were with Saddam Hussein. Now approaches the time for cost analysis.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month ago, the Biggest Show in the Middle East was playing Amman, with high-wire drama and eye-catching color filling every inch of the tent: In Ring No. 1, the tragic spectacle of tens of thousands of Asian refugees from Kuwait and Iraq, swarming for food and shelter in pitiful camps on the Jordanian desert. In Ring 2, Saddamania, the magical explosion of popular support for the Iraqi president.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Security Council urged Wednesday night that Jordan be given emergency financial aid to cushion the impact of U.N. sanctions against Iraq. Both Jordan and Bulgaria pleaded for relief from the embargo in what was expected to be only the first of many requests from countries claiming to be hard hit by the embargo imposed after Iraq's Aug. 2 invasion of Kuwait.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States has quietly launched an international effort to stabilize Jordan's leadership in the face of fears that Iraq might try to topple the new monarch and that economic turmoil could destabilize the country's currency, U.S. officials said Saturday. The package of measures, pitched by President Clinton in a series of messages to world leaders, includes a request to Congress to free up $300 million in U.S.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
As many as 1,000 Muslim worshipers protesting increased bread prices clashed with police in at least two towns, injuring 14 people, witnesses said. The wounded included several police officers hit by stones, according to a government employee. Police used tear gas to disperse the crowds in the southern communities of Karak and Maan and made an unspecified number of arrests. There were conflicting accounts about the protests and the number of casualties.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Jordan's small size--its population is perhaps 3.4 million--belies its importance in the geopolitics of the Middle East. That became clear during the Gulf War when King Hussein angered many Americans and a lot of other people by remaining neutral. Jordan observed United Nations sanctions against Iraq--its main trading partner--but did not join the coalition forces in the Gulf. Members of the U.S.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
This nation's binge of Saddamania is over now, and portraits of the Iraqi president are long gone from Amman's shop windows. But, oh, what a hangover. Two months after the Persian Gulf War, Jordan's pro-Iraqi populace still feels the ache, and will for months to come. Cabdriver Musa Mohammed, telling his American passenger, "George Bush good, Saddam Hussein bad," knows that words alone will not bring relief.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The south of Iraq will become a large graveyard for every invader against this pure land." Another military communique from Baghdad? No, it was Jordanian Prime Minister Mudar Badran addressing Parliament just hours before the suspension of operations in the Persian Gulf War. Jordan's official policy during the conflict was neutrality, but its politicians, press and people wore their hearts on their sleeves. They were with Saddam Hussein. Now approaches the time for cost analysis.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month ago, the Biggest Show in the Middle East was playing Amman, with high-wire drama and eye-catching color filling every inch of the tent: In Ring No. 1, the tragic spectacle of tens of thousands of Asian refugees from Kuwait and Iraq, swarming for food and shelter in pitiful camps on the Jordanian desert. In Ring 2, Saddamania, the magical explosion of popular support for the Iraqi president.
NEWS
April 24, 1989 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
King Hussein returned to Jordan on Sunday to confront his most serious internal political crisis in nearly 20 years after riots over price increases spread across the kingdom last week. The country remained calm Sunday, with no outbursts of violence reported since Friday night. However, police and troops were still out in force in Maan, Salt, Karak and several other towns and villages where the rioting, touched off by sharp price increases, erupted Tuesday night. Hussein, who canceled a planned visit to Britain to fly home directly from his trip to the United States, conferred with his Cabinet ministers Sunday amid widespread expectations that he will address the nation within the next few days on economic and political reforms.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
This nation's binge of Saddamania is over now, and portraits of the Iraqi president are long gone from Amman's shop windows. But, oh, what a hangover. Two months after the Persian Gulf War, Jordan's pro-Iraqi populace still feels the ache, and will for months to come. Cabdriver Musa Mohammed, telling his American passenger, "George Bush good, Saddam Hussein bad," knows that words alone will not bring relief.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdullah Nsour put plainly the woes of Jordan as seen from his city in the rocky hills northwest of Amman. "People come to me and say, 'Mr. Mayor, I'm going to be ruined,' " he said. "Our problem is poverty." Other cities are hurting more in the backwash of the trade embargo against Iraq. In the southern port of Aqaba, for instance, there are only two or three ships this week at docks with room for 16. The shock was sudden in Aqaba.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign tourists have vanished, Red Sea dockworkers are idle and 70% of the national truck fleet is off the road. International air tickets out of Amman carry a $100 war-risk surcharge. Jordan is paying a heavy price for the international sanctions against neighboring Iraq--and is demanding help to offset it. "Our economy was pitiful before the trouble began.
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