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Jordan Elections

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WORLD
January 23, 2013 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
AMMAN, Jordan - Jordan's parliamentary elections Wednesday crystallized the challenges facing King Abdullah II in his 13th year in power: Can he provide a government that is credible with his restive population and able to tackle the nation's serious economic woes and endemic corruption? At least 56% of the 2.3 million registered voters turned out, the nation's electoral commission said, in what some observers described as an endorsement of Abdullah's reform plans. The turnout topped the 53% for the parliamentary elections in 2010 even though several major parties boycotted the balloting.
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WORLD
January 23, 2013 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
AMMAN, Jordan - Jordan's parliamentary elections Wednesday crystallized the challenges facing King Abdullah II in his 13th year in power: Can he provide a government that is credible with his restive population and able to tackle the nation's serious economic woes and endemic corruption? At least 56% of the 2.3 million registered voters turned out, the nation's electoral commission said, in what some observers described as an endorsement of Abdullah's reform plans. The turnout topped the 53% for the parliamentary elections in 2010 even though several major parties boycotted the balloting.
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NEWS
November 5, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Tribal leaders loyal to King Hussein won a majority in parliamentary elections marred by the lowest turnout ever and a boycott by the main opposition Islamic Action Front and eight other parties. The tribal chiefs secured at least 45 seats in the 80-member lower house of parliament, according to partial returns. Final results are expected today. Just 54.5% of the kingdom's 1.
WORLD
November 10, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
The only suspense surrounding parliamentary elections here and in other Arab countries for many years has been over how many seats the opposition would be allowed to win. But in Jordanian elections Tuesday, even that question was put to rest beforehand. The main Islamic opposition group and other parties boycotted ? not because the vote was rigged against them, but because they say parliament has become pointless. "There is a conviction that political reform through the elections is useless," said Zaki Bani Arshid, a leader of the Islamic Action Front, the country's main opposition movement.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jordan's first parliamentary election in 22 years has deprived the government of an assured majority for the first time in the history of Jordan's Parliament, hitherto dominated by the executive branch. A government source said that 20 of the fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood's 26-man slate had won seats in the 80-seat lower house, along with at least 12 allied independents. He said seven Arab nationalists and four radical leftists, including one Communist, had won seats.
NEWS
October 29, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Muslim religious court heard charges of apostasy, or abandonment of religious faith, against a women's rights advocate running for Parliament. Islamic conservatives prosecuting Toujan Faisal, one of 12 female candidates in next month's general election, want the Islamic court in Amman to declare her incompetent, dissolve her marriage and give immunity to anyone shedding her blood. Faisal, 40, is a former television journalist who aired topics such as child abuse and wife beating.
NEWS
November 11, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
King Hussein promised a referendum on a plan to liberalize political life in Jordan. The promise came on the heels of a national parliamentary election in which Islamic groups made strong gains and conservatives loyal to Hussein lost ground. Political parties have been outlawed in the country since 1957, but the government did not enforce the ban before and during the election. Asked if the ban on parties would lifted in any liberalization of policies, Hussein said, "This is the aim."
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jordanians voted in their first general election in 22 years, a parliamentary contest that included women for the first time. An Interior Ministry spokesman said that at least 62% of the 877,000 eligible voters cast ballots. A broad range of candidates demanded the end of martial law, formal legalization of political parties and greater press freedom, as well as support of the Palestinian uprising on the West Bank. Unofficial returns are expected by Thursday.
NEWS
November 7, 1989 | NICK WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Campaign banners flapped like freshly washed laundry last week on the streets of Amman, where Wednesday's national elections promise a new look in Jordanian politics. The first full-scale balloting in 22 years will fill 80 seats in the lower house of Parliament with men--and possibly a woman or two--eager to take up King Hussein's pledge of a more open system of government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1997
Your Nov. 2 report, claiming that Jordan's parliamentary elections are seen as a "setback" for Jordan's democratization march, leaves issues in need of clarification. Some opposition members voluntarily chose to boycott the elections, which were free and fair. Some of those who chose to disobey the party line and run for parliament did indeed win or retain their seats. That the Jordanian public did not abide by the boycott, indicated by the 44% voter turnout, speaks for itself. Regarding the press law, a clear consensus existed among the Jordanian public that tabloids were increasingly becoming a problem for Jordanian society, which is for the most part socially conservative.
SPORTS
October 29, 1999 | JUDY PASTERNAK
Michael Jordan has achieved legendary status playing college, Olympic and professional basketball, assumed global celebrity, lent his name to a sneaker and earned millions of dollars. At 36, what he has never done is vote. But that seems likely to change. For the first time, Jordan is eligible to cast a ballot. On Thursday afternoon, the Lake County, Ill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1997
Your Nov. 2 report, claiming that Jordan's parliamentary elections are seen as a "setback" for Jordan's democratization march, leaves issues in need of clarification. Some opposition members voluntarily chose to boycott the elections, which were free and fair. Some of those who chose to disobey the party line and run for parliament did indeed win or retain their seats. That the Jordanian public did not abide by the boycott, indicated by the 44% voter turnout, speaks for itself. Regarding the press law, a clear consensus existed among the Jordanian public that tabloids were increasingly becoming a problem for Jordanian society, which is for the most part socially conservative.
NEWS
November 5, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Tribal leaders loyal to King Hussein won a majority in parliamentary elections marred by the lowest turnout ever and a boycott by the main opposition Islamic Action Front and eight other parties. The tribal chiefs secured at least 45 seats in the 80-member lower house of parliament, according to partial returns. Final results are expected today. Just 54.5% of the kingdom's 1.
NEWS
November 9, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 800,000 Jordanian and Palestinian voters poured into 2,900 polling booths Monday, casting a record number of ballots for a wide assortment of traditional elders, Islamists, leftists and pro-government moderates in peaceful parliamentary voting that appeared to reinforce Jordan's key role in Middle East democracy.
OPINION
November 19, 1989 | G. H. Jansen, G. H. Jansen is the author of "Militant Islam."
Jordan this month held the first, free, honest general election in any Arab or Muslim country since World War II, when these countries achieved independence. In all earlier popular exercises, women have been excluded, polls were single-party charades, results were bought by rich candidates or rigged through official interference. The balloting Nov. 8 was free from all these disabilities.
NEWS
November 11, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
King Hussein promised a referendum on a plan to liberalize political life in Jordan. The promise came on the heels of a national parliamentary election in which Islamic groups made strong gains and conservatives loyal to Hussein lost ground. Political parties have been outlawed in the country since 1957, but the government did not enforce the ban before and during the election. Asked if the ban on parties would lifted in any liberalization of policies, Hussein said, "This is the aim."
SPORTS
October 29, 1999 | JUDY PASTERNAK
Michael Jordan has achieved legendary status playing college, Olympic and professional basketball, assumed global celebrity, lent his name to a sneaker and earned millions of dollars. At 36, what he has never done is vote. But that seems likely to change. For the first time, Jordan is eligible to cast a ballot. On Thursday afternoon, the Lake County, Ill.
WORLD
November 10, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
The only suspense surrounding parliamentary elections here and in other Arab countries for many years has been over how many seats the opposition would be allowed to win. But in Jordanian elections Tuesday, even that question was put to rest beforehand. The main Islamic opposition group and other parties boycotted ? not because the vote was rigged against them, but because they say parliament has become pointless. "There is a conviction that political reform through the elections is useless," said Zaki Bani Arshid, a leader of the Islamic Action Front, the country's main opposition movement.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jordan's first parliamentary election in 22 years has deprived the government of an assured majority for the first time in the history of Jordan's Parliament, hitherto dominated by the executive branch. A government source said that 20 of the fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood's 26-man slate had won seats in the 80-seat lower house, along with at least 12 allied independents. He said seven Arab nationalists and four radical leftists, including one Communist, had won seats.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jordanians voted in their first general election in 22 years, a parliamentary contest that included women for the first time. An Interior Ministry spokesman said that at least 62% of the 877,000 eligible voters cast ballots. A broad range of candidates demanded the end of martial law, formal legalization of political parties and greater press freedom, as well as support of the Palestinian uprising on the West Bank. Unofficial returns are expected by Thursday.
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