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Jordan Finances

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NEWS
August 23, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Security Council urged Wednesday night that Jordan be given emergency financial aid to cushion the impact of U.N. sanctions against Iraq. Both Jordan and Bulgaria pleaded for relief from the embargo in what was expected to be only the first of many requests from countries claiming to be hard hit by the embargo imposed after Iraq's Aug. 2 invasion of Kuwait.
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NEWS
September 28, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdullah Nsour put plainly the woes of Jordan as seen from his city in the rocky hills northwest of Amman. "People come to me and say, 'Mr. Mayor, I'm going to be ruined,' " he said. "Our problem is poverty." Other cities are hurting more in the backwash of the trade embargo against Iraq. In the southern port of Aqaba, for instance, there are only two or three ships this week at docks with room for 16. The shock was sudden in Aqaba.
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NEWS
August 2, 1988 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Palestinian doctors on the Israeli-occupied West Bank get their medical licenses through the Jordanian Physicians' Union. The West Bank equivalent of the SAT, which every high school student must pass in order to enter college, is graded and certified by the Jordanian government. Every employee of a West Bank mosque--from the priest, or imam, to the janitor--is paid by the Jordanian Ministry of Islamic Affairs.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Security Council urged Wednesday night that Jordan be given emergency financial aid to cushion the impact of U.N. sanctions against Iraq. Both Jordan and Bulgaria pleaded for relief from the embargo in what was expected to be only the first of many requests from countries claiming to be hard hit by the embargo imposed after Iraq's Aug. 2 invasion of Kuwait.
NEWS
August 2, 1988 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
The kingdom of Jordan, implementing a decision by King Hussein to sever its ties to the West Bank, will cut off all funds and relinquish all responsibility for government services in the Israeli-occupied territories, senior Jordanian sources said Monday. The decision, disclosed one day after Hussein announced he was ceding Jordan's claims to the West Bank to the Palestine Liberation Organization, was expected to deal a severe economic blow to the territory's 850,000 Arab inhabitants.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdullah Nsour put plainly the woes of Jordan as seen from his city in the rocky hills northwest of Amman. "People come to me and say, 'Mr. Mayor, I'm going to be ruined,' " he said. "Our problem is poverty." Other cities are hurting more in the backwash of the trade embargo against Iraq. In the southern port of Aqaba, for instance, there are only two or three ships this week at docks with room for 16. The shock was sudden in Aqaba.
NEWS
March 4, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
The Jordanian government has come up embarrassingly short in its effort to finance an ambitious development plan for the Israeli-occupied West Bank area. Jordan's failure to raise adequate funding for the proposed $1-billion program is also raising doubts about King Hussein's ability to offset the influence of the Palestine Liberation Organization in the West Bank area, one of the basic goals of the development plan.
SPORTS
January 14, 1999 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a sadness to it all, except that sometimes the sadness is tinged with joy, perhaps because our hero is still our hero, calling his own shot, even the last shot, which is when to call it all off. Most don't, and emotions collide because we want our heroes to stay heroes and cringe when they are suddenly unheroic. We want Jim Brown, leading the NFL in rushing, then retiring to become an actor well before he was no longer a football player. We don't want John Unitas or Joe Namath, playing out the string.
NEWS
August 2, 1988 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Palestinian doctors on the Israeli-occupied West Bank get their medical licenses through the Jordanian Physicians' Union. The West Bank equivalent of the SAT, which every high school student must pass in order to enter college, is graded and certified by the Jordanian government. Every employee of a West Bank mosque--from the priest, or imam, to the janitor--is paid by the Jordanian Ministry of Islamic Affairs.
NEWS
August 2, 1988 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
The kingdom of Jordan, implementing a decision by King Hussein to sever its ties to the West Bank, will cut off all funds and relinquish all responsibility for government services in the Israeli-occupied territories, senior Jordanian sources said Monday. The decision, disclosed one day after Hussein announced he was ceding Jordan's claims to the West Bank to the Palestine Liberation Organization, was expected to deal a severe economic blow to the territory's 850,000 Arab inhabitants.
NEWS
March 4, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
The Jordanian government has come up embarrassingly short in its effort to finance an ambitious development plan for the Israeli-occupied West Bank area. Jordan's failure to raise adequate funding for the proposed $1-billion program is also raising doubts about King Hussein's ability to offset the influence of the Palestine Liberation Organization in the West Bank area, one of the basic goals of the development plan.
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