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March 3, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The south of Iraq will become a large graveyard for every invader against this pure land." Another military communique from Baghdad? No, it was Jordanian Prime Minister Mudar Badran addressing Parliament just hours before the suspension of operations in the Persian Gulf War. Jordan's official policy during the conflict was neutrality, but its politicians, press and people wore their hearts on their sleeves. They were with Saddam Hussein. Now approaches the time for cost analysis.
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NEWS
May 30, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
King Hussein swore in his chief delegate to the Middle East peace talks as Jordan's prime minister and instructed him to prepare for parliamentary elections. The appointment was widely seen as a reward for Abdul Salam Majali, the first Jordanian to publicly negotiate peace with Israel. Majali, 68, also took over the portfolio of foreign affairs--an indication that he will remain in overall command of Jordan's delegation to the peace talks.
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NEWS
April 5, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Two high-ranking Jordanian officials left for the United States on Saturday, while King Hussein traveled to Morocco in a whirlwind of diplomatic activity apparently aimed at reviving the long-dormant Middle East peace process. Prime Minister Zaid Rifai and Foreign Minister Taher Masri headed for Washington, where they are scheduled to meet this week with Vice President George Bush, Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The south of Iraq will become a large graveyard for every invader against this pure land." Another military communique from Baghdad? No, it was Jordanian Prime Minister Mudar Badran addressing Parliament just hours before the suspension of operations in the Persian Gulf War. Jordan's official policy during the conflict was neutrality, but its politicians, press and people wore their hearts on their sleeves. They were with Saddam Hussein. Now approaches the time for cost analysis.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
King Hussein swore in his chief delegate to the Middle East peace talks as Jordan's prime minister and instructed him to prepare for parliamentary elections. The appointment was widely seen as a reward for Abdul Salam Majali, the first Jordanian to publicly negotiate peace with Israel. Majali, 68, also took over the portfolio of foreign affairs--an indication that he will remain in overall command of Jordan's delegation to the peace talks.
NEWS
May 9, 1988 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz's Middle East peace plan is unworkable in its current form, and the U.S. position will have to "evolve considerably" before any real progress can be made, according to senior Jordanian officials. Jordan, the officials added, is seeking a number of "clarifications" of the plan from the United States before Shultz returns to the region next month.
NEWS
May 9, 1988 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz's Middle East peace plan is unworkable in its current form, and the U.S. position will have to "evolve considerably" before any real progress can be made, according to senior Jordanian officials. Jordan, the officials added, is seeking a number of "clarifications" of the plan from the United States before Shultz returns to the region next month.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Two high-ranking Jordanian officials left for the United States on Saturday, while King Hussein traveled to Morocco in a whirlwind of diplomatic activity apparently aimed at reviving the long-dormant Middle East peace process. Prime Minister Zaid Rifai and Foreign Minister Taher Masri headed for Washington, where they are scheduled to meet this week with Vice President George Bush, Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger.
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