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NEWS
February 22, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dismissing PLO chief Yasser Arafat as a "clown," King Hussein of Jordan as a "goner" and President Ali Abdullah Saleh of Yemen as "an illiterate man," Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the United States vows that Arab supporters of Iraq will be made to pay dearly for choosing the wrong side.
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NEWS
August 15, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Hussein started reaping diplomatic rewards Monday for his decision to grant senior Iraqi officials asylum here and assured Jordanians that the kingdom need not fear Iraqi retaliation. Saudi Arabia began speeding what had been a tentative, reluctant reconciliation with Jordan, inviting Jordanian Foreign Minister Karim Kabariti to Riyadh today to arrange for a summit between King Hussein and Saudi King Fahd.
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NEWS
February 24, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saddam Hussein was so stunned by the ferocity of the allied air attacks against him that he accused his former Soviet allies of not warning him what the United States and its partners had in store for Iraq, allied intelligence said Saturday. The sources said that at one point Hussein told a Soviet intermediary that he had been willing to withdraw from Kuwait since early January, but the United States had made that impossible with its continued threats.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saddam Hussein was so stunned by the ferocity of the allied air attacks against him that he accused his former Soviet allies of not warning him what the United States and its partners had in store for Iraq, allied intelligence said Saturday. The sources said that at one point Hussein told a Soviet intermediary that he had been willing to withdraw from Kuwait since early January, but the United States had made that impossible with its continued threats.
NEWS
September 24, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lowering the threshold of war, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein declared Sunday that he will strike Israel and the Persian Gulf oil fields if the American-led blockade begins to strangle Iraq. "Oil, the region and Israel will be the victims of the resulting deluge," the defiant Iraqi leader declared. "It is those who create this deluge who will be strangled. The oil lands in Saudi Arabia and other countries will be unable to meet the requirements of the occupation forces (U.S.
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Hussein started reaping diplomatic rewards Monday for his decision to grant senior Iraqi officials asylum here and assured Jordanians that the kingdom need not fear Iraqi retaliation. Saudi Arabia began speeding what had been a tentative, reluctant reconciliation with Jordan, inviting Jordanian Foreign Minister Karim Kabariti to Riyadh today to arrange for a summit between King Hussein and Saudi King Fahd.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Saudi Arabia has agreed to provide Jordan with half its daily oil needs, Jordanian officials said Wednesday, in a move that observers said is aimed at weaning Jordan from its reluctance to apply a U.N. trade embargo against Iraq. The provision of oil would help cushion some of the cost for Jordan of enforcing an embargo against Iraq, which invaded Kuwait three weeks ago. For the past decade, Jordan has received 90% of its crude from Iraq.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdullah Nsour put plainly the woes of Jordan as seen from his city in the rocky hills northwest of Amman. "People come to me and say, 'Mr. Mayor, I'm going to be ruined,' " he said. "Our problem is poverty." Other cities are hurting more in the backwash of the trade embargo against Iraq. In the southern port of Aqaba, for instance, there are only two or three ships this week at docks with room for 16. The shock was sudden in Aqaba.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government here has ordered Iraq, Jordan and Yemen to sharply reduce their embassy staffs in Saudi Arabia, a move that follows a halt in Saudi oil deliveries to Jordan and new restrictions on Yemeni workers in the kingdom. The actions quickly raised the pressure against nations thought to be aiding Iraq and marked a new move by Saudi Arabia to utilize its massive economic muscle to control the outcome of the Persian Gulf crisis.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jordanian truck drivers claimed Wednesday that Saudi Arabian customs officials were damaging their trucks as Persian Gulf politics continued to sour relations between the two countries. The dispute, too new to do any serious damage to either side, nevertheless underlines the Arab divisions over the gulf crisis and the proliferating problems they are causing. Officials in Amman and Riyadh dodged comment on the controversy, but the evidence was clear at their frontier.
NEWS
February 22, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dismissing PLO chief Yasser Arafat as a "clown," King Hussein of Jordan as a "goner" and President Ali Abdullah Saleh of Yemen as "an illiterate man," Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the United States vows that Arab supporters of Iraq will be made to pay dearly for choosing the wrong side.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jordanian truck drivers claimed Wednesday that Saudi Arabian customs officials were damaging their trucks as Persian Gulf politics continued to sour relations between the two countries. The dispute, too new to do any serious damage to either side, nevertheless underlines the Arab divisions over the gulf crisis and the proliferating problems they are causing. Officials in Amman and Riyadh dodged comment on the controversy, but the evidence was clear at their frontier.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdullah Nsour put plainly the woes of Jordan as seen from his city in the rocky hills northwest of Amman. "People come to me and say, 'Mr. Mayor, I'm going to be ruined,' " he said. "Our problem is poverty." Other cities are hurting more in the backwash of the trade embargo against Iraq. In the southern port of Aqaba, for instance, there are only two or three ships this week at docks with room for 16. The shock was sudden in Aqaba.
NEWS
September 24, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lowering the threshold of war, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein declared Sunday that he will strike Israel and the Persian Gulf oil fields if the American-led blockade begins to strangle Iraq. "Oil, the region and Israel will be the victims of the resulting deluge," the defiant Iraqi leader declared. "It is those who create this deluge who will be strangled. The oil lands in Saudi Arabia and other countries will be unable to meet the requirements of the occupation forces (U.S.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government here has ordered Iraq, Jordan and Yemen to sharply reduce their embassy staffs in Saudi Arabia, a move that follows a halt in Saudi oil deliveries to Jordan and new restrictions on Yemeni workers in the kingdom. The actions quickly raised the pressure against nations thought to be aiding Iraq and marked a new move by Saudi Arabia to utilize its massive economic muscle to control the outcome of the Persian Gulf crisis.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Saudi Arabia has agreed to provide Jordan with half its daily oil needs, Jordanian officials said Wednesday, in a move that observers said is aimed at weaning Jordan from its reluctance to apply a U.N. trade embargo against Iraq. The provision of oil would help cushion some of the cost for Jordan of enforcing an embargo against Iraq, which invaded Kuwait three weeks ago. For the past decade, Jordan has received 90% of its crude from Iraq.
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