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NEWS
November 10, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jordan's first parliamentary election in 22 years has deprived the government of an assured majority for the first time in the history of Jordan's Parliament, hitherto dominated by the executive branch. A government source said that 20 of the fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood's 26-man slate had won seats in the 80-seat lower house, along with at least 12 allied independents. He said seven Arab nationalists and four radical leftists, including one Communist, had won seats.
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NEWS
March 29, 2000 | BOB DROGIN and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a setback for accused international terrorist Osama bin Laden, Jordanian authorities working with U.S. intelligence and law enforcement agencies indicted 28 of his followers Tuesday for allegedly plotting attacks against American tourists and others at sites across Jordan in December. The terrorist group allegedly planned to kill Westerners crossing into Jordan from Israel, to bomb a hotel popular with U.S.
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NEWS
February 6, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The man who will replace King Hussein as head of the Hashemite dynasty, his eldest son, Abdullah, is keen to reassure listeners here and abroad that he will continue the policies of his dying father. Yet even as he speaks, 37-year-old Crown Prince Abdullah shows the markings of a new generation of rising leaders whose coming of age may one day sweep the Middle East. In a rare interview--his first since he was unexpectedly named heir to the throne Jan.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They filed past King Hussein's flag-shrouded coffin in remarkable homage Monday, many of them sworn enemies who until recently were bent on mutual destruction. Presidents and kings, muftis and sultans, generals and spies paused to pray for the Middle East's longest-serving ruler and to salute Jordan's new monarch, Abdullah II, on the first full day of his reign.
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Hussein's disclosure to the Jordanian people that he is suffering from cancer has caused panic in some and denial in others. But in most cases, the illness of the 62-year-old ruler has focused people's minds on the future of the Hashemite Kingdom. In unusually candid remarks by a monarch to his subjects, Hussein confirmed Tuesday that he has been diagnosed with cancer of the lymphatic tissue but vowed that he will win his latest battle.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Near a desert oasis that once was the headquarters of Lawrence of Arabia, a Jordanian air base is quietly being reconstructed this month to host nearly 1,500 U.S. Air Force troops and 34 F-16s that will soon start flying daily sorties over southern Iraq. U.S. warplanes based in the Jordanian desert to monitor Saddam Hussein's army? The very idea would have been unthinkable a few years ago.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
King Hussein told the new Parliament in Amman that he will legalize political parties and relax martial law, opening the way to more freedom in Jordan after the first national elections in 22 years. "There is no doubt the current National Assembly represents a new phase in our life," Hussein said. Political parties have been banned for 33 years in Jordan after a coup attempt, and martial law has been in force for 22 years, since the Arab-Israeli War of 1967.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Mudar Badran reshuffled his Cabinet, appointing a new foreign minister and bringing five members of the fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood into the government. A government statement said former Foreign Minister Taher Masri would replace Marwan Kassem as minister of foreign affairs. Masri, chairman of the lower house of Parliament's foreign affairs committee, has shown strong support for Iraq's stand in the Persian Gulf crisis.
NEWS
April 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. Defense Secretary William S. Cohen said Jordan is seeking tank-killing A-10 fighter jets to bolster its air force. Cohen, beginning his first visit to the Middle East as Defense secretary, spoke to reporters after meeting Jordan's Prime Minister Abdul Salam Majali in Amman, the capital. The heavily armored A-10 jets operate mainly on low-flying missions and were used to destroy large numbers of Iraqi tanks in the Persian Gulf War. They are in the process of being phased out of the U.S.
NEWS
March 22, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Jordan said that it welcomed the latest prominent defector from Iraq--an ex-army chief of staff reportedly ousted in 1990 in a dispute over Iraq's invasion of Kuwait. Lt. Gen. Nazir Khazraji directed the armed forces during the final three years of the Iran-Iraq war, making him one of the highest-ranking officers ever to flee President Saddam Hussein's regime. A Jordanian official would not confirm whether Khazraji had actually arrived in Jordan.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The transition to a Jordan without King Hussein commenced Saturday when the government declared the dying monarch too sick to rule and his son and heir, Abdullah, was sworn in as acting head of state. With Hussein losing his battle against cancer and placed on life support, his 47-year reign came to an end. The duties and responsibilities of the monarchy moved to a career army officer with little political experience who was named crown prince just 11 days ago.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States has quietly launched an international effort to stabilize Jordan's leadership in the face of fears that Iraq might try to topple the new monarch and that economic turmoil could destabilize the country's currency, U.S. officials said Saturday. The package of measures, pitched by President Clinton in a series of messages to world leaders, includes a request to Congress to free up $300 million in U.S.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Finished with his tea and backgammon, Deeb Hamouda whipped out a Palestinian newspaper and planted a kiss on the front-page photograph of Jordan's dying King Hussein. "He was our best king," Hamouda, a farmer in his 70s, said with a smile. "But he was the cause of our disaster."
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The man who will replace King Hussein as head of the Hashemite dynasty, his eldest son, Abdullah, is keen to reassure listeners here and abroad that he will continue the policies of his dying father. Yet even as he speaks, 37-year-old Crown Prince Abdullah shows the markings of a new generation of rising leaders whose coming of age may one day sweep the Middle East. In a rare interview--his first since he was unexpectedly named heir to the throne Jan.
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Personally risky, deeply controversial and warmly human, it was a gesture that those who witnessed it will never forget. King Hussein of Jordan, direct descendant of the prophet Muhammad, had insisted on traveling to Israel to extend his personal condolences to the families of seven Israeli schoolgirls shot and killed during a border field trip by a deranged Jordanian soldier two years ago.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the final hours before he left Jordan again last week, a sick and frail King Hussein toiled late into the night, feverishly scribbling a long stream of thoughts that ended in the summary dismissal of his brother as crown prince. The king's fitful musings were interrupted by an unplanned trip to the hospital, his fifth in five days, when doctors informed him that he had to return urgently to the U.S. for more of the cancer treatment that had sustained his life.
NEWS
May 1, 1988
Jordan ordered an NBC television correspondent to leave the country after he reported that Jordan has a "tightly controlled and at times even repressive society." Rick Davis, one of a small number of American television correspondents based in Arab countries, was given a week to leave. Information Minister Hani Khasawneh said Davis' feature about Jordan on NBC's "Sunday Today" was "clearly against the country."
BUSINESS
June 26, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Jordan's small size--its population is perhaps 3.4 million--belies its importance in the geopolitics of the Middle East. That became clear during the Gulf War when King Hussein angered many Americans and a lot of other people by remaining neutral. Jordan observed United Nations sanctions against Iraq--its main trading partner--but did not join the coalition forces in the Gulf. Members of the U.S.
NEWS
January 30, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his debut this week as crown prince, Abdullah ibn Hussein seemed at ease as he smiled warmly and clasped hands with the hundreds of politicians, Bedouin tribal leaders and clerics who paraded across the marble floors of Raghadan Palace. "We should talk--soon," he whispered to one former prime minister. "Let's get together once all these formalities are over," he told a senator.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Feverish and weak, King Hussein on Tuesday rushed back to the U.S. cancer clinic where he had spent much of the last six months undergoing chemotherapy, leaving Jordanians to worry about their monarch's mortality. The king's sudden departure came just hours after he had formally anointed his eldest son, Prince Abdallah, as heir to the Hashemite throne. His absence put the 36-year-old army commander in charge of the monarchy on his very first day as crown prince.
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