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Jordan High School

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1998 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years Michele Ohayon was a shadow. With cameras rolling, Ohayon followed six young people from Watts, filming them in school, in their homes and, in one case, in jail. The result is "Colors Straight Up," a moving documentary that tells the story of their lives and dilemmas. Early Tuesday morning, four years after embarking on the project, Ohayon received the call every filmmaker yearns for: The documentary has been nominated for an Academy Award.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1996
A 17-year-old Jordan High School football player has been charged with murder and attempted murder for a shooting that took place after an Oct. 4 game in Playa del Rey, the district attorney's office announced Wednesday. The football player, whose name has been withheld because of his age, also was charged with one count of being a minor in possession of a firearm, officials said.
SPORTS
February 12, 1996 | GEORGE DOHRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jordan and Mater Dei were the big winners when the CIF Southern Section boys' basketball playoff pairings were announced Sunday. Jordan's 24-3 record and Moore League title helped it edge Esperanza (23-3) and Victor Valley (23-2) for the I-AA top spot. Mater Dei, the South Coast League champion, was seeded first in the I-A division after compiling a 27-1 record. The Monarchs will face at-large invitee Santa Ana in the opening round on Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Their grades were only fair. Their SAT scores? Middling at best. And not one of them could afford the price of a college education. But the eight South Los Angeles high schoolers had something, their principals agreed: a glint of untapped potential, a determination to try. At a Wednesday news conference sponsored by the United Negro College Fund, those eight youngsters were transformed from "at-risk" teen-agers into bona fide college material.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It could have been the frenzied emergency room of a county hospital. A teen-aged rape victim lay on the floor in the fetal position, crying inconsolably and sucking her thumb. A petite girl with long brown hair asked for a pregnancy test but ended up disclosing that she recently had been molested and beaten. A 17-year-old with purple eyebrows and barrettes to match was having an asthma attack triggered by stress. Another teen-ager wanted the Norplant contraceptive removed from her arm.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | CHARLES SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As a new year begins, three questions surrounding Central City basketball have surfaced. First, what's wrong with Crenshaw, which has lost as many games this year--two--as it did all of last season? Second, how did Washington, which defeated Crenshaw in the 4-A Final of the Pacific Open Tournament, become so good, so fast? Third, and perhaps most interesting: Can anybody stop Clem Breedlove?
SPORTS
October 3, 1994 | ERIC SHEPARD, TIMES PREP SPORTS EDITOR
Deep in the heart of South Central-Los Angeles, far removed from his glory days in Oakland, Willie Brown has set up shop as football coach at Jordan High. Instead of being cheered by thousands of screaming fans in a large stadium, Brown conducts his business these days on a makeshift field bordering the Nickerson Gardens housing project in Watts. Adding to the challenge is that Jordan has not won a varsity football game in three years.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | JOHN COX
About 100 students at Jordan High School will take part in training sessions to help ease racial tensions at the North Long Beach school. A four-day workshop on cultural sensitivity will begin Monday, Jordan Co-Principal Mel Collins said. The group will also take field trips to hospital emergency rooms, jails and the county coroner's office to learn about crime and law enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1994 | Compiled for The Times by Ethan Allen Thomas Jr
GEOVANI NOVOA Dropout, 16, Los Angeles; left Washington High School in 10th grade; father of a 3-month-old girl Being a father does put a lot of pressure on me. Even though I'm just a child, I have to act like a man now. I haven't gone to school for a year. I dropped out to start looking for a job. I want to get back into school because having a McDonald's-type job won't help me take care of my family. My girlfriend doesn't accept any help from the government.
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