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NEWS
August 12, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Jordan facing bleak times in the current Middle East crisis, officials and observers are having second thoughts about the wisdom of its apparent backing for Iraq and the invasion of Kuwait. Jordan finds itself treated with hostility by neighboring Saudi Arabia and other oil-producing countries of the Persian Gulf. The United States and Europe are pressuring Jordan's leader, King Hussein, to apply U.N.-authorized economic sanctions against the Iraqi government of Saddam Hussein.
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SPORTS
May 27, 2008 | Bill Dwyre
When politics was saying goodbye last week to Hamilton Jordan, so was tennis. Jordan died at 63 after a long battle with cancer, and his obituaries correctly dwelt on the career of a man who, in his early 30s, designed the strategy that got Jimmy Carter elected president in 1976. By 35, the controversial, complicated Jordan was Carter's chief of staff. After Carter left the presidency, Jordan eventually found his way into tennis.
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NEWS
June 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
King Abdullah II accepted the resignation of the government and appointed a new prime minister seen as a keen supporter of economic reform. The appointee, economist Ali Abu Ragheb, will form a new Cabinet. In a message to outgoing Prime Minister Abdul Raouf Rawabdeh on state-run Jordan Television, the king expressed his appreciation to the previous government. Rawabdeh's resignation was widely expected after parliament criticized the government's progress on political and economic reforms.
NEWS
June 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
King Abdullah II accepted the resignation of the government and appointed a new prime minister seen as a keen supporter of economic reform. The appointee, economist Ali Abu Ragheb, will form a new Cabinet. In a message to outgoing Prime Minister Abdul Raouf Rawabdeh on state-run Jordan Television, the king expressed his appreciation to the previous government. Rawabdeh's resignation was widely expected after parliament criticized the government's progress on political and economic reforms.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
When King Hussein reopened the doors of Jordanian democracy two years ago, the fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood's solid showing at the polls sent a political message to the palace. Now the king has sent a message back. At a pivotal moment in Arab-Israeli relations, the king last month appointed Taher Masri, a veteran politician and Palestinian moderate, to head the new government. The fundamentalists could get with Hussein's peace program or take a walk.
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new wave of Islamic activism surging through the Middle East in the wake of the Persian Gulf War is forcing moderate governments to confront an essential dilemma of the new Arab democracy: How do you keep the most popular party from winning?
SPORTS
May 27, 2008 | Bill Dwyre
When politics was saying goodbye last week to Hamilton Jordan, so was tennis. Jordan died at 63 after a long battle with cancer, and his obituaries correctly dwelt on the career of a man who, in his early 30s, designed the strategy that got Jimmy Carter elected president in 1976. By 35, the controversial, complicated Jordan was Carter's chief of staff. After Carter left the presidency, Jordan eventually found his way into tennis.
NEWS
February 8, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the Jewish state and average Israelis alike responded to the death of Jordan's King Hussein on Sunday with heartfelt grief, as if to the loss of a family member rather than an Arab leader. Israeli radio played mourning songs traditionally broadcast during national tragedies, and state television followed events in neighboring Jordan minute by minute.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just before the ground war, when Persian Gulf tensions were greatest, a senior official with the French government in Paris noted a peculiar phenomenon of geography and Arab politics. "The popularity of Saddam Hussein," he said, "seems to be inversely proportional to the distance between Iraq and other Arab countries." With the exception of Jordan, where politics were dictated by a dominant Palestinian population, the Arab countries closest to the Iraqi president all vehemently opposed him.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old saying that you can't fight City Hall has been turned on its head in this divided and tense capital of religious and political extremes. Teddy Kollek, perhaps the world's best known mayor, is finding that his own City Hall can't fight. Kollek, one of the last grand figures of Zionism, clings to a vision of a united city of disparate groups living in separate but equal communities in mutual respect.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
When King Hussein reopened the doors of Jordanian democracy two years ago, the fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood's solid showing at the polls sent a political message to the palace. Now the king has sent a message back. At a pivotal moment in Arab-Israeli relations, the king last month appointed Taher Masri, a veteran politician and Palestinian moderate, to head the new government. The fundamentalists could get with Hussein's peace program or take a walk.
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new wave of Islamic activism surging through the Middle East in the wake of the Persian Gulf War is forcing moderate governments to confront an essential dilemma of the new Arab democracy: How do you keep the most popular party from winning?
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Jordan facing bleak times in the current Middle East crisis, officials and observers are having second thoughts about the wisdom of its apparent backing for Iraq and the invasion of Kuwait. Jordan finds itself treated with hostility by neighboring Saudi Arabia and other oil-producing countries of the Persian Gulf. The United States and Europe are pressuring Jordan's leader, King Hussein, to apply U.N.-authorized economic sanctions against the Iraqi government of Saddam Hussein.
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