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Jordan R Young

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July 11, 1998 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not exactly a reunion. But today, for the first time in half a century, old friends Dan O'Herlihy and Peggy Webber will play opposite each other again. The last time was when Webber played Lady MacDuff to his MacDuff in Orson Welles' 1948 movie of "Macbeth." This time, she gets to play Irish actor Eileen Crowe to O'Herlihy's F.J.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1998 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not exactly a reunion. But today, for the first time in half a century, old friends Dan O'Herlihy and Peggy Webber will play opposite each other again. The last time was when Webber played Lady MacDuff to his MacDuff in Orson Welles' 1948 movie of "Macbeth." This time, she gets to play Irish actor Eileen Crowe to O'Herlihy's F.J.
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TRAVEL
July 22, 2007
Your article on Las Vegas tipping ["Right at the Tipping Point," July 1] is pretty much right on the money, but taxi drivers are getting greedy. When you give drivers a 10% to 20% tip in San Francisco or New York, they say thank you. But when you similarly tip a Vegas cabbie these days, you often get a dirty look and/or a rude remark. JORDAN R. YOUNG Costa Mesa
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1991
See Dan Rather. See Dan in Kuwait City. See Dan wander around a makeshift Iraqi bunker. See Dan play with live ammo. See Dan make a fool of himself. I saw it, but I didn't believe it. Rather, the only voice of integrity during coverage of the '89 San Francisco earthquake--the only TV journalist who didn't exploit that tragedy--had suddenly lowered himself to doing a Geraldo Rivera imitation. Rather was lucky; he could have blown his arm off playing with the unspent ammunition.
TRAVEL
December 20, 1992
In her article on Cinematheque Francaise ("The Reel Thing at Paris Film Museum," Nov. 8), Caitlin Rother observes that "some items of star clothing . . . will no longer be seen here, thanks to thieves . . . . " Other artifacts will one day cease to exist thanks to patrons like Rother who are compelled to touch them. And if the tour guide doesn't have the presence of mind to throw her off the premises for handling costumes, the Cinematheque is in a sorry state. JORDAN R. YOUNG Anaheim
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1998
In Kristine McKenna's fine interview with Alan Arkin ("Who Says You Have to Be a Star?," Jan. 25), John Cassavetes is identified as the director of "Big Trouble." Although he was the accredited director, the film is not his work. According to a Film Comment article by Raymond Carney, perhaps the leading authority on the director, Cassavetes stepped in "for a variety of personal reasons and for the only time in his career" when Andrew Bergman bailed out in mid-production. Although his efforts to make something from the mess he inherited proved futile, Carney writes, Cassavetes allowed his name to be attached to the film and declined to reveal the truth behind it, "out of professional loyalty to the production and personal loyalty to some of his actor friends involved in it," including Peter Falk, who co-starred with Arkin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2001
"Blackwell's Corner," a play envisioning the last earthly moments of James Dean, is the winner of the Orange County Playwrights Alliance's annual Page to Stage contest for California playwrights. The one-act play by Laurel Ollstein of Culver City is about a young woman whose fantasy life is overactive, even before Dean, her idol, stops by the failing rural diner she runs. Dean is about to die in his famous car wreck, but Sara's dream life proves stronger than death.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1999
In Amy Wallace's otherwise fine article about Al Pacino ("The Place He Likes to Be," June 27), there was some misinformation. The role of Erie in Eugene O'Neill's "Hughie" was first performed in English not by Jason Robards but by Burgess Meredith in the 1963 Bath Theatre Festival production, reprised that same year in London. The night clerk was played by Jack MacGowran, who spoke his occasional lines as written, unlike the Robards and Ben Gazzara productions, where the clerk remained mute.
NEWS
July 28, 1999
* Barbara DeMarco Barrett will interview children's book author Janelle Cannon ("Stellaluna") and literary agent Steve Malk at 6 p.m. today on KUCI (88.9 FM) in Irvine. * John Gobbell will sign his techno-thriller "Code for Tomorrow" at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Latitude 33 Bookshop, 311 Ocean Ave., Laguna Beach. * The Rude Guerrilla Theater Company will present a reading of Jordan R. Young's "Picasso's Mustache," a new full-length comedy about Salvador Dali and Pablo Picasso, at 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1997
"2037--and Counting" (by Steve Schmidt, May 25) was a very informative and amusing article on Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks. But contrary to popular belief, the near-legendary stable of writers on "Your Show of Shows" did not include Larry Gelbart or Woody Allen. Gelbart is not happy that this misconception has been perpetuated through the years. To quote him from my forthcoming book, "Comedy Writing in Radio and TV's Golden Age": "It's not fair to the original guys. I think the people who did do it were very unique.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1998 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Staged readings of new plays, like those at the Orange County Playwrights Alliance at the Vanguard Theatre on Saturday, are concerned with only one question: Does the play work? Never mind the actors, the staging, the pace. The play, the script in the actors' hands, is the thing. The four plays that made up "Discoveries at the Vanguard" display a common interest in mythologies, entertainment history and jettisoning psychological realism.
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