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Jordan Relief

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NEWS
September 7, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with angry outcries, the United Nations on Thursday acknowledged shortcomings in the distribution of relief to tens of thousands of refugees stranded in Jordan, but a prominent U.S. relief official predicted that the worst problems will be overcome in a couple of weeks.
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NEWS
February 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A top Iraqi relief organizer appealed for humanitarian aid and warned of epidemics spreading beyond Iraq's borders. "I appeal to the world's humanitarian societies to offer us aid, assistance and everything that alleviates human suffering, especially that of women and children," Ahmed Khaled Abdul-Hameed, head of foreign relations at the Iraqi Red Crescent Society, told a news conference in Amman, Jordan.
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NEWS
September 9, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aid is lagging to ten of thousands of Asian refugees from Kuwait marooned in perilous desert camps here while out-of-sync international relief agencies and the hard-pressed Jordanian government grapple with one another and a crisis whose magnitude has overwhelmed them. Organizational structures and relief supply lines are emerging after a belated start, but most of the refugees still lack basic necessities, relief specialists and Jordanian officials complained in interviews.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jordanian government reopened its border with Iraq on Friday, inviting a refugee exodus fraught with danger in the middle of a war. Nine days after closing the crossing for lack of international financial support, Jordan announced that it would take in refugees of all nationalities fleeing Iraq and Kuwait. Jordanian officials estimated that more than a million people might make the run for the border.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International relief officials Saturday proclaimed a virtual end to the two-month refugee crisis in Jordan while they begin to make plans for potentially larger numbers of refugees should war break out in the Persian Gulf. There were still about 37,000 Asian refugees in well-ordered tent encampments in Jordan, but they are being moved out at the rate of about 7,000 a day, representatives of the U.N. Disaster Relief Office (UNDRO) said Saturday.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 50,000 Asian refugees from Kuwait are trapped in desperation on a scorched patch of desert near the Iraqi border here, short of food, water and hope. Awaiting elusive repatriation, their companions are fear, boredom, asphyxiating red tape and the specter of epidemic. There is no shade. By day, thirsty refugees from a half dozen countries bake under a merciless sun and 100-degree temperatures. There are few tents.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A split between the United States and its European allies is stalling plans to aid Jordan, one of the countries suffering most from the effects of U.N. Security Council sanctions against Iraq. The split became public Friday as Italian Foreign Minister Gianni De Michelis, current chairman of the European Community, briefed reporters on the Europeans' increasingly independent foreign policy.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An icy wind blew through the director's tent as Thaher Hadid spoke of the prospect of a human disaster looming just beyond his desert outpost, a mass of 1,548 mostly vacant canvas tents known as Azraq I evacuation camp. Here, he explained during the weekend, more than 1 million Asians, Egyptians, Sudanese and other Third World workers fleeing Kuwait after Iraq's invasion took refuge after Aug. 2, stretching the compassion of Hadid's nation and the rest of the world last fall.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jordanian government reopened its border with Iraq on Friday, inviting a refugee exodus fraught with danger in the middle of a war. Nine days after closing the crossing for lack of international financial support, Jordan announced that it would take in refugees of all nationalities fleeing Iraq and Kuwait. Jordanian officials estimated that more than a million people might make the run for the border.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before dawn Tuesday, a cargo plane from the United States brought 500 tents to Jordan. Along with another 500 brought in from a U.N. warehouse in Italy, they were trucked to a stretch of desert near Jordan's frontier with Iraq. By this afternoon, the 1,000 tents should be bursting with refugees from Kuwait and Iraq. But by then, another 5,000 or 10,000 or 20,000 new refugees will have streamed into Jordan from Iraq with nothing to eat or drink and nowhere to sleep.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An icy wind blew through the director's tent as Thaher Hadid spoke of the prospect of a human disaster looming just beyond his desert outpost, a mass of 1,548 mostly vacant canvas tents known as Azraq I evacuation camp. Here, he explained during the weekend, more than 1 million Asians, Egyptians, Sudanese and other Third World workers fleeing Kuwait after Iraq's invasion took refuge after Aug. 2, stretching the compassion of Hadid's nation and the rest of the world last fall.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International relief officials Saturday proclaimed a virtual end to the two-month refugee crisis in Jordan while they begin to make plans for potentially larger numbers of refugees should war break out in the Persian Gulf. There were still about 37,000 Asian refugees in well-ordered tent encampments in Jordan, but they are being moved out at the rate of about 7,000 a day, representatives of the U.N. Disaster Relief Office (UNDRO) said Saturday.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A split between the United States and its European allies is stalling plans to aid Jordan, one of the countries suffering most from the effects of U.N. Security Council sanctions against Iraq. The split became public Friday as Italian Foreign Minister Gianni De Michelis, current chairman of the European Community, briefed reporters on the Europeans' increasingly independent foreign policy.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aid is lagging to ten of thousands of Asian refugees from Kuwait marooned in perilous desert camps here while out-of-sync international relief agencies and the hard-pressed Jordanian government grapple with one another and a crisis whose magnitude has overwhelmed them. Organizational structures and relief supply lines are emerging after a belated start, but most of the refugees still lack basic necessities, relief specialists and Jordanian officials complained in interviews.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with angry outcries, the United Nations on Thursday acknowledged shortcomings in the distribution of relief to tens of thousands of refugees stranded in Jordan, but a prominent U.S. relief official predicted that the worst problems will be overcome in a couple of weeks.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before dawn Tuesday, a cargo plane from the United States brought 500 tents to Jordan. Along with another 500 brought in from a U.N. warehouse in Italy, they were trucked to a stretch of desert near Jordan's frontier with Iraq. By this afternoon, the 1,000 tents should be bursting with refugees from Kuwait and Iraq. But by then, another 5,000 or 10,000 or 20,000 new refugees will have streamed into Jordan from Iraq with nothing to eat or drink and nowhere to sleep.
NEWS
February 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A top Iraqi relief organizer appealed for humanitarian aid and warned of epidemics spreading beyond Iraq's borders. "I appeal to the world's humanitarian societies to offer us aid, assistance and everything that alleviates human suffering, especially that of women and children," Ahmed Khaled Abdul-Hameed, head of foreign relations at the Iraqi Red Crescent Society, told a news conference in Amman, Jordan.
SPORTS
May 30, 1989 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
In a congested corner of the visitors' locker room in Phoenix on Sunday, somewhat ignored by other celebrants of the Lakers' Western Conference finals sweep of the Suns, Coach Pat Riley grabbed Magic Johnson by the neck and planted a kiss that landed somewhere near his collarbone. Riley, however, has vowed not to be so affectionate when the Lakers, 11-0 in the playoffs, resume working out this week while awaiting their opponent in the National Basketball Assn. championship series.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 50,000 Asian refugees from Kuwait are trapped in desperation on a scorched patch of desert near the Iraqi border here, short of food, water and hope. Awaiting elusive repatriation, their companions are fear, boredom, asphyxiating red tape and the specter of epidemic. There is no shade. By day, thirsty refugees from a half dozen countries bake under a merciless sun and 100-degree temperatures. There are few tents.
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