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NEWS
February 6, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Personally risky, deeply controversial and warmly human, it was a gesture that those who witnessed it will never forget. King Hussein of Jordan, direct descendant of the prophet Muhammad, had insisted on traveling to Israel to extend his personal condolences to the families of seven Israeli schoolgirls shot and killed during a border field trip by a deranged Jordanian soldier two years ago.
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NEWS
October 4, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The economy is still stagnant. Unemployment hangs stubbornly around 20%, by most measures. And the gap between rich and poor is growing. But seven months since the death of King Hussein left Jordanians uneasy about the future in a nation with daunting domestic problems, many here are encouraged by early signals from Hussein's son and successor, King Abdullah II.
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NEWS
January 30, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his debut this week as crown prince, Abdullah ibn Hussein seemed at ease as he smiled warmly and clasped hands with the hundreds of politicians, Bedouin tribal leaders and clerics who paraded across the marble floors of Raghadan Palace. "We should talk--soon," he whispered to one former prime minister. "Let's get together once all these formalities are over," he told a senator.
NEWS
May 27, 1999 | Associated Press
In an effort to persuade Syria not to make a separate peace with Israel, Jordan's King Abdullah--on his first visit here--and Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat emphasized Wednesday the importance of Palestinians to all Mideast peacemaking. The declaration was important for Arafat, who is scrambling to head off a separate Israeli-Syrian agreement he fears will weaken him in future negotiations with the Israelis.
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The man who will replace King Hussein as head of the Hashemite dynasty, his eldest son, Abdullah, is keen to reassure listeners here and abroad that he will continue the policies of his dying father. Yet even as he speaks, 37-year-old Crown Prince Abdullah shows the markings of a new generation of rising leaders whose coming of age may one day sweep the Middle East. In a rare interview--his first since he was unexpectedly named heir to the throne Jan.
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | From Reuters
Palestinians in the this refugee camp prayed for King Hussein on Friday, having more to fear than most from the loss of one of the region's few pillars of stability. Several said Jordan was the only country that had given citizenship and shelter to Palestinians when they fled their homes during the 1948 and 1967 Arab-Israeli wars. Many in the hot and squalid Baqaa camp, on the outskirts of the capital, Amman, said simply: "May God cure him."
NEWS
May 27, 1999 | Associated Press
In an effort to persuade Syria not to make a separate peace with Israel, Jordan's King Abdullah--on his first visit here--and Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat emphasized Wednesday the importance of Palestinians to all Mideast peacemaking. The declaration was important for Arafat, who is scrambling to head off a separate Israeli-Syrian agreement he fears will weaken him in future negotiations with the Israelis.
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In contrast to most of its Arab neighbors, Jordan was one country where it had been clear for years who would take over when the current ruler departs. That, in turn, had given Jordan rare stability in a volatile region and made the desert kingdom a trustworthy ally for Washington. King Hussein changed all that this week with a few choice words that have shaken the status quo to the core and stunned both Jordanians and their foreign friends. Upon his return home after six months of cancer treatment in the United States--and with questions lingering about his health--Hussein indicated that his brother, Hassan, who has been the designated heir to the throne for the last 34 years, will be replaced by one of the king's own sons.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The transition to a Jordan without King Hussein commenced Saturday when the government declared the dying monarch too sick to rule and his son and heir, Abdullah, was sworn in as acting head of state. With Hussein losing his battle against cancer and placed on life support, his 47-year reign came to an end. The duties and responsibilities of the monarchy moved to a career army officer with little political experience who was named crown prince just 11 days ago.
NEWS
May 15, 1999 | Associated Press
President Clinton is urging Japan, Germany, France and other creditor nations to cancel or defer Jordan's debts to help its new young king cope with a faltering economy. King Abdullah II arrived Friday for a weeklong official visit that will include a meeting with Clinton at the White House on Tuesday and talks with Cabinet officials and members of Congress.
NEWS
May 15, 1999 | Associated Press
President Clinton is urging Japan, Germany, France and other creditor nations to cancel or defer Jordan's debts to help its new young king cope with a faltering economy. King Abdullah II arrived Friday for a weeklong official visit that will include a meeting with Clinton at the White House on Tuesday and talks with Cabinet officials and members of Congress.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They filed past King Hussein's flag-shrouded coffin in remarkable homage Monday, many of them sworn enemies who until recently were bent on mutual destruction. Presidents and kings, muftis and sultans, generals and spies paused to pray for the Middle East's longest-serving ruler and to salute Jordan's new monarch, Abdullah II, on the first full day of his reign.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring his doctors' advice not to travel, a frail President Boris N. Yeltsin flew to Jordan on Monday to pay his respects to King Hussein--and to remind the world that Russia's leader still has a place in international affairs. Arriving at the king's palace in Amman, Yeltsin, 68, walked slowly up the steps with the help of an aide. Appearing somewhat disoriented, he waved to people in the crowd outside, then spent about 15 minutes in the palace before departing.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The transition to a Jordan without King Hussein commenced Saturday when the government declared the dying monarch too sick to rule and his son and heir, Abdullah, was sworn in as acting head of state. With Hussein losing his battle against cancer and placed on life support, his 47-year reign came to an end. The duties and responsibilities of the monarchy moved to a career army officer with little political experience who was named crown prince just 11 days ago.
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The man who will replace King Hussein as head of the Hashemite dynasty, his eldest son, Abdullah, is keen to reassure listeners here and abroad that he will continue the policies of his dying father. Yet even as he speaks, 37-year-old Crown Prince Abdullah shows the markings of a new generation of rising leaders whose coming of age may one day sweep the Middle East. In a rare interview--his first since he was unexpectedly named heir to the throne Jan.
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | From Reuters
Palestinians in the this refugee camp prayed for King Hussein on Friday, having more to fear than most from the loss of one of the region's few pillars of stability. Several said Jordan was the only country that had given citizenship and shelter to Palestinians when they fled their homes during the 1948 and 1967 Arab-Israeli wars. Many in the hot and squalid Baqaa camp, on the outskirts of the capital, Amman, said simply: "May God cure him."
NEWS
September 21, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First they wept for him. Then they prayed. And finally, millions gave offerings of thanks from the heart: larger-than-life portraits of ailing King Hussein, hand-painted and draped from bridges, hotels, office towers and shops; pledges to build mosques and schools in his name; thousands of banners proclaiming their monarch "a national treasure" and his recovery a miracle.
NEWS
December 17, 1990 | Reuters
Crown Prince Hassan met Sunday with a group of leading U.S. clergymen on a "peace pilgrimage" to the Middle East. The state news agency Petra said Hassan briefed them on Jordan's efforts to find a U.N.-backed Arab solution to the crisis sparked by Iraq's invasion of Kuwait.
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | ELAINE GALE
Haitham Ahmed Bundakji remembers meeting King Hussein of Jordan at an ice-skating rink in Amman, Jordan, when he was 9 years old. Asking Muslims at the Islamic Society of Orange County on Friday to pray for the ailing Hussein during prayers, he emphasized it wasn't an official request of the center, but rather a plea from his heart. Bundakji, 50, was born in Jordan and lived there for 19 years before moving to Garden Grove in 1968.
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Personally risky, deeply controversial and warmly human, it was a gesture that those who witnessed it will never forget. King Hussein of Jordan, direct descendant of the prophet Muhammad, had insisted on traveling to Israel to extend his personal condolences to the families of seven Israeli schoolgirls shot and killed during a border field trip by a deranged Jordanian soldier two years ago.
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