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Jordan Travel Restrictions

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NEWS
August 23, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overwhelmed by a dramatic wave of refugees fleeing Kuwait, Jordan suddenly closed its borders to them Wednesday night, even as help was reported on the way in the form of a European-sponsored airlift for stranded Egyptians. The closure came as King Hussein, the Jordanian leader, announced that 42,000 refugees, most of them Egyptian migrant workers, had entered Jordan by way of Iraq and Saudi Arabia on Wednesday alone. About 185,000 people have arrived since the invasion of Kuwait on Aug.
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NEWS
January 28, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 5,000 refugees from war-torn Iraq remained trapped Sunday at the Jordanian border, enduring bitter cold on the open desert. Snow fell overnight, and puddles were sheeted with ice on the fifth day since Iraqi officials, without warning or explanation, closed the border crossing point. The few refugees who were permitted to cross into Jordan told reporters that stranded families were sleeping in cars and buses and some were taking shelter under the vehicles.
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NEWS
August 24, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of refugees stranded in a vast no man's land between the border posts of Jordan and Iraq struggled to continue their arduous journey Thursday in the face of intense heat, a lack of water and food and the tie-up of a border that has been ordered closed. Jordan officially closed its border at midnight Wednesday because huge numbers of refugees, mainly Egyptian, were stacking up at its southern port, Aqaba, for lack of ships to take them away.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government Friday formally reopened Jordan's border with Iraq, a frontier it was unable in fact to fully shut down because of the press of refugees fleeing Kuwait who trekked across the desert despite intense heat, lack of water and threat of disease. Jordan announced that it would try to regulate the flow of migrants into the country and keep it at 20,000 a day, but that goal seemed unrealistic.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 5,000 refugees from war-torn Iraq remained trapped Sunday at the Jordanian border, enduring bitter cold on the open desert. Snow fell overnight, and puddles were sheeted with ice on the fifth day since Iraqi officials, without warning or explanation, closed the border crossing point. The few refugees who were permitted to cross into Jordan told reporters that stranded families were sleeping in cars and buses and some were taking shelter under the vehicles.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government Friday formally reopened Jordan's border with Iraq, a frontier it was unable in fact to fully shut down because of the press of refugees fleeing Kuwait who trekked across the desert despite intense heat, lack of water and threat of disease. Jordan announced that it would try to regulate the flow of migrants into the country and keep it at 20,000 a day, but that goal seemed unrealistic.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of refugees stranded in a vast no man's land between the border posts of Jordan and Iraq struggled to continue their arduous journey Thursday in the face of intense heat, a lack of water and food and the tie-up of a border that has been ordered closed. Jordan officially closed its border at midnight Wednesday because huge numbers of refugees, mainly Egyptian, were stacking up at its southern port, Aqaba, for lack of ships to take them away.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overwhelmed by a dramatic wave of refugees fleeing Kuwait, Jordan suddenly closed its borders to them Wednesday night, even as help was reported on the way in the form of a European-sponsored airlift for stranded Egyptians. The closure came as King Hussein, the Jordanian leader, announced that 42,000 refugees, most of them Egyptian migrant workers, had entered Jordan by way of Iraq and Saudi Arabia on Wednesday alone. About 185,000 people have arrived since the invasion of Kuwait on Aug.
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