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Jordan Valley

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NEWS
July 2, 1987 | Associated Press
King Hussein took the controls of a camouflaged military helicopter and flew visiting Austrian President Kurt Waldheim on a tour of the Jordan Valley with a clear view of Israel today. The king flew the former U.N. secretary general over Jordan's richest farmland, giving Waldheim a look at Israel and the West Bank that Israel captured from Jordan in 1967.
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WORLD
January 16, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu met Thursday with Jordanian King Abdullah II to discuss developments related to the Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations, according to Petra, Jordan's news agency. Netanyahu's visit to Amman was not announced ahead of time, and was publicly reported from Jordan only after it ended. King Abdullah's talks with Netanyahu follow separate meetings held recently with Secretary of State John F. Kerry and with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas.
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NEWS
April 29, 1990 | ALISTAIR LYON, REUTERS
The fertile hills around the ancient settlement of Pella are yielding traces of a million years of human activity in the Jordan Valley. Archeologists digging here for 12 years under the direction of Prof. Basil Hennessy of Sydney University in Australia have uncovered a record of human existence reaching back to Stone Age hunters and forward to Ottoman times, and most of the years in between.
WORLD
December 12, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM - U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry returned to the Middle East on Thursday for a round of meetings with Israeli and Palestinian leaders in a continuing effort to help reach a peace deal by spring. Kerry met with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank city of Ramallah on Thursday and was expected to meet with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Friday. The peace negotiations, which resumed during the summer with a May goal for a deal, have seen both sides entrenched in their positions.
SCIENCE
June 8, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Israel is referred to repeatedly in the Bible — 17 times, in fact — as the "land of milk and honey," but until three years ago, archaeologists had discovered little firm evidence that beekeeping was ever practiced there. Many scholars, in fact, assumed "honey" referred to a nectar from dates or other fruits. Then, three years ago, researchers found a 3,000-year-old apiary in the Iron Age city of Tel Rehov in the Jordan Valley, the oldest known commercial beekeeping facility in the world, suggesting that the word "honey" likely referred to the real thing.
SPORTS
September 26, 1987
Jeff Foster, 20, a Boise State basketball player from Salinas, Calif., was killed in a traffic accident east of Jordan Valley, Ore., near the Idaho border.
NEWS
October 3, 1995 | From Associated Press
Dozens of Jewish settlers broke through Israeli army barricades and waded across the Jordan River into Jordan on Monday to protest increasing Palestinian autonomy in the West Bank. Two Jordanian army officers arrived at the rocky riverbank but did not interfere. Soaked demonstrators surrounded the officers and shook their hands.
NEWS
June 29, 1987
Syria, aided by the Soviet Union, appears to be engaged in a major project to divert the waters of the Yarmuk River, threatening Jordan's main farming area, Israeli Agriculture Minister Arye Nehemkin said. "If reports . . . are correct, the project poses a grave threat to Jordan because all the agriculture on the Jordanian side of the Jordan Valley is based on water from the Yarmuk," a tributary of the Jordan River, he said on state radio.
OPINION
June 5, 2011 | By Dore Gold
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's recent statement that Israel can't defend itself with borders drawn along pre-1967 lines has been questioned in certain foreign policy circles. These critics have noted that Israel successfully fought two wars, in 1956 and in 1967, while based within those borders. And they have claimed that borders don't matter as much in modern warfare. But Netanyahu is right. The idea that the 1967 line isn't defensible has actually been around for decades. Indeed, the architects of Israel's national security doctrine reached that conclusion soon after the Six-Day War. The main strategic problem that Israel faced at that time was the enormous asymmetry between its small standing army, which needed to be reinforced with a timely reserve mobilization, and the large standing armies of its neighbors, which could form coalitions in times of tension and exploit Israel's narrow geography with overwhelming numbers.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Political pressure mounted Saturday on King Hussein to dismiss his government and delay further IMF-mandated economic reforms following four days of bloody rioting over price increases. Although the capital has been relatively unaffected by the unrest, several thousand heavily armed troops remained deployed throughout Salt, 13 miles northwest of Amman, where rioting overnight left at least 21 people injured and caused widespread damage. Apart from a small and peaceful demonstration by university students in Amman, no further protests were reported Saturday, although the situation in Salt, Maan, Karak and several other riot-torn towns remained extremely tense.
WORLD
December 6, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry, concluding his latest effort to advance Israeli-Palestinian peace talks on Friday, sounding encouraged about progress despite ongoing tension between the parties. "We are closer than we have been in years" to bringing peace to the region, Kerry told the press Friday morning before departing Israel for Washington. After arriving in Israel on Wednesday night, Kerry met with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu three times and once with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.
WORLD
October 11, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- An Israeli man was beaten to death in the backyard of his home in the Jordan Valley overnight, medical and security officials told media early Friday morning. According to his wife, Sariya Ofer was investigating a noise outside the couple's house in the isolated settlement of Brosh Habika when he was attacked by two men who beat him with iron rods and axes. Ofer, 61, was a retired Israeli army colonel. His wife, Monique, called for help and fled through the fields until reaching the main road two hours later.
OPINION
October 10, 2013
Re "The one-state illusion," Opinion, Oct. 6 Jeremy Ben-Ami is correct that a one-state democracy will not provide either Palestinians or Jews with a state to express their national identities, and the only reason that a one-state solution is discussed is because of frustration that no peace agreement has been reached. But Ben-Ami does not identify why 20 years of talks have not been successful: Israel does not want a Palestinian state. Ben-Ami suggests that all can be resolved if President Obama would only set a solution on the table.
WORLD
September 24, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM--The eviction of a tiny Palestinian community has sparked a sharp dispute between Israel and the European Union that is threatening to become a diplomatic crisis over allegations of abusing a French diplomat. Last week, Israeli authorities demolished the homes and structures of Khirbet Makhoul, a Palestinian community of around 20 families in the northern Jordan Valley after a legal ruling determined they were built without permits. A few days later, a group of activists and European diplomats arrived at the ruined site.
OPINION
June 5, 2011 | By Dore Gold
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's recent statement that Israel can't defend itself with borders drawn along pre-1967 lines has been questioned in certain foreign policy circles. These critics have noted that Israel successfully fought two wars, in 1956 and in 1967, while based within those borders. And they have claimed that borders don't matter as much in modern warfare. But Netanyahu is right. The idea that the 1967 line isn't defensible has actually been around for decades. Indeed, the architects of Israel's national security doctrine reached that conclusion soon after the Six-Day War. The main strategic problem that Israel faced at that time was the enormous asymmetry between its small standing army, which needed to be reinforced with a timely reserve mobilization, and the large standing armies of its neighbors, which could form coalitions in times of tension and exploit Israel's narrow geography with overwhelming numbers.
OPINION
December 17, 2010 | By Ali Abunimah
Israel's deputy minister of foreign affairs, Danny Ayalon, paints a picture of an innocent Israel yearning for peace, virtually begging the intransigent Palestinians to come negotiate so there can be a "two-states-for-two-peoples solution" ("Who's stopping the peace process?" Dec. 14). But it's one that bears no resemblance to the realities Palestinians experience and much of the world sees every day. Ayalon claims that the settlements Israel refuses to stop building on occupied land are a "red herring" and present no obstacles to peace because in the "43 years since Israel gained control of the West Bank, the built-up areas of the settlements constitute less than 1.7% of the total area.
WORLD
December 12, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM - U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry returned to the Middle East on Thursday for a round of meetings with Israeli and Palestinian leaders in a continuing effort to help reach a peace deal by spring. Kerry met with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank city of Ramallah on Thursday and was expected to meet with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Friday. The peace negotiations, which resumed during the summer with a May goal for a deal, have seen both sides entrenched in their positions.
NEWS
January 11, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior Israeli military officers said Thursday that the nation's armed forces are in a "stepped-up" state of alert, and they noted that the Jordanian army also appears to have accelerated its activity. The quicker military pace came a day after the failure of the U.S.-Iraqi talks in Geneva to reach any accord on how to avert a military clash in the Persian Gulf. After those talks, Iraqi Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz warned that if war breaks out in the gulf, Iraq will strike Israel.
WORLD
October 7, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Only a month into a new round of peace talks, the Obama administration is drawing criticism from allies and veteran diplomats that it is giving away too much just to keep negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians from collapsing. Administration officials have offered an assortment of inducements to persuade Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to extend a freeze on Jewish construction in the West Bank for two months. Palestinian officials have threatened to break off the talks unless Israel extends the freeze that expired Sept.
SCIENCE
June 8, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Israel is referred to repeatedly in the Bible — 17 times, in fact — as the "land of milk and honey," but until three years ago, archaeologists had discovered little firm evidence that beekeeping was ever practiced there. Many scholars, in fact, assumed "honey" referred to a nectar from dates or other fruits. Then, three years ago, researchers found a 3,000-year-old apiary in the Iron Age city of Tel Rehov in the Jordan Valley, the oldest known commercial beekeeping facility in the world, suggesting that the word "honey" likely referred to the real thing.
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