Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJordan Whitney Inc
IN THE NEWS

Jordan Whitney Inc

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 27, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From his easy chair or the treadmill nearby, John Kogler watches half a dozen televisions at once, all showing infomercials from VCRs in fast-play mode--and can spot changes from previous versions in any of those 30-minute commercials. He and his wife, Clare, also view new infomercials in so-called real time, the same half hour it takes anyone to watch them, and they put their observations in a weekly report dubbed the Green Sheet, because of the color of its hard-to-photocopy pages.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 27, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From his easy chair or the treadmill nearby, John Kogler watches half a dozen televisions at once, all showing infomercials from VCRs in fast-play mode--and can spot changes from previous versions in any of those 30-minute commercials. He and his wife, Clare, also view new infomercials in so-called real time, the same half hour it takes anyone to watch them, and they put their observations in a weekly report dubbed the Green Sheet, because of the color of its hard-to-photocopy pages.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 17, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jan West holds a piece of paper at arm's length and wrinkles her nose as if the paper stinks. That's how most advertising agencies look at the infomercial, says West, who buys TV time for the medium. "They think it's sleazy. They actually have an attitude." Infomercials--30-minute programs intended mainly to sell a product or service--are the Rodney Dangerfield of television: They get no respect.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1999 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Less than a year ago, Billy Blanks was a $70-an-hour personal trainer with a growing celebrity clientele--not exactly a rare job description in Los Angeles. Today, thanks to the power of video and an oft-aired TV infomercial, Blanks is on the verge of becoming the most popular fitness guru since Jane Fonda.
NATIONAL
July 5, 2005 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
The voice seems inescapable. In the middle of the night, it haunts TV screens. At rush hour, it beckons from the radio dial: "I'm Dr. Greg Cynaumon." For nearly two years, Cynaumon and his diet pill infomercials have saturated the airwaves, proclaiming CortiSlim's ability to slash weight by controlling stress. To some, the pitches have become as obnoxious as Sit 'n Sleep's "You're killing me, Larry" spots.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1994 | MATTHEW HELLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Over the past five years, Mike Levey has filled television air time across the nation, selling everything from car wax to electric juice extractors on 30-minute infomercials. The programs have generated about $20 million in sales for his company, Positive Response Television, and in a good year the company makes 30 cents of profit for every $1 in sales. Along the way, Levey, its chairman and chief executive, has become a TV personality, known for his boyish enthusiasm and garish sweaters.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the middle of the night and the upbeat infomercial host beckons with tales of romances about to happen, careers ready to take off and riches waiting to be discovered. And it be all yours for just $3.99 a minute. Channel hop late at night and it's impossible to miss one of these 900-number psychic phone lines, currently raking in millions of dollars a year.
MAGAZINE
August 9, 1992 | MARGO KAUFMAN, Contributing editor Margo Kaufman's book, "1-800-AM-I-NUTS?," will be published by Random House this winter. The collection of essays has nothing to do with infomercials.
The following story is a paid presentation of the Los Angeles Times Magazine. (Fade in: A stunning reporter in a classic Chanel suit looks up from the computer console in her tastefully decorated writing salon. Her radiant face fills the screen. She speaks.) I'll never forget the first time. I turned on the TV looking for the news and found John Davidson, former Hollywood Square, wearing a three-piece suit and an orchid lei, crooning in front of a lush Hawaiian vista.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|