Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJorge Armando Arroyo Garcia
IN THE NEWS

Jorge Armando Arroyo Garcia

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2006 | Jill Leovy, Times Staff Writer
Jorge "Armando" Arroyo Garcia, the fugitive accused of the killing of a Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy nearly four years ago, was arrested in the state of Jalisco, Mexico, on Thursday, according to Los Angeles County and Mexican authorities. Garcia is alleged to have killed Deputy David March at a traffic stop in Irwindale in April 2002 and has since been at large. His was one of the most high-profile and controversial fugitive cases involving Mexico in recent years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2007 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
A man who fled to Mexico after murdering a Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy during a traffic stop nearly five years ago was sentenced in a Pomona courtroom Friday to life without the possibility of parole. Jorge Arroyo Garcia, 30, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder for shooting Deputy David March during a traffic stop near Irwindale in the San Gabriel Valley in 2002. Garcia was arrested by Mexican authorities at his uncle's ranch outside of Guadalajara a year ago and handed over to the U.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2007 | Sam Enriquez and Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writers
A man suspected of killing a Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy during a 2002 traffic stop was turned over by Mexican authorities Tuesday to face murder charges in Los Angeles. Jorge "Armando" Arroyo Garcia was arrested 11 months ago by Mexican police in the fatal shooting of Deputy David March but had fought extradition. A final court appeal was denied last month. Guarded by a Mexican federal police SWAT team and U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2007 | Sam Enriquez and Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writers
A man suspected of killing a Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy during a 2002 traffic stop was turned over by Mexican authorities Tuesday to face murder charges in Los Angeles. Jorge "Armando" Arroyo Garcia was arrested 11 months ago by Mexican police in the fatal shooting of Deputy David March but had fought extradition. A final court appeal was denied last month. Guarded by a Mexican federal police SWAT team and U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2007 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
A man who fled to Mexico after murdering a Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy during a traffic stop nearly five years ago was sentenced in a Pomona courtroom Friday to life without the possibility of parole. Jorge Arroyo Garcia, 30, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder for shooting Deputy David March during a traffic stop near Irwindale in the San Gabriel Valley in 2002. Garcia was arrested by Mexican authorities at his uncle's ranch outside of Guadalajara a year ago and handed over to the U.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2003 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
A congressman and Los Angeles County's district attorney and sheriff called upon the Bush administration Monday to renegotiate the extradition treaty with Mexico to secure the return of 60 murder suspects, including a man charged with the murder of a sheriff's deputy. Rep.
OPINION
December 16, 2003
David A. Garcia is scheduled to appear in a Los Angeles court next week, charged with murder in the Nov. 15 shooting of Burbank Police Officer Matthew Pavelka. Garcia's arrest in Tijuana followed a two-week manhunt involving 1,000 police officers from agencies on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border. It was a remarkable effort, the kind of cross-jurisdictional cooperation that Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca has been pushing as a response to all violent gang crimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2004 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
The United States must increase pressure on Mexico to improve its economic conditions and discourage illegal immigration, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Rosario Marin said Thursday in her first major policy speech of the campaign. The root cause of such movement has been masked by the contentious debates over immigrant driver's licenses and President Bush's proposal for a temporary guest-worker program, she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2002 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County sheriff's officials on Wednesday named a suspect in the shooting death of a sheriff's deputy Monday: Jorge "Armando" Arroyo Garcia, a 25-year-old illegal immigrant and suspected drug dealer who may have fled back to Mexico. On Wednesday afternoon, Baldwin Park police found the 1989 Nissan Maxima that Garcia drove when he allegedly killed Deputy David March, authorities said. The car was found on the 14100 block of Chilcot Street near Baldwin Park Boulevard, said sheriff's Sgt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2004 | Daren Briscoe, Times Staff Writer
Galvanized by the slaying of a sheriff's deputy whose killer allegedly fled to Mexico, a throng of marchers gathered Saturday in Santa Clarita to demand changes in an extradition treaty between the United States and Mexico that they say allows hundreds of killers to escape justice. Organized by Santa Clarita officials, the "Dave's March for Justice Rally" was named for Deputy David March, who was gunned down during an April 2002 traffic stop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2006 | Jill Leovy, Times Staff Writer
Jorge "Armando" Arroyo Garcia, the fugitive accused of the killing of a Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy nearly four years ago, was arrested in the state of Jalisco, Mexico, on Thursday, according to Los Angeles County and Mexican authorities. Garcia is alleged to have killed Deputy David March at a traffic stop in Irwindale in April 2002 and has since been at large. His was one of the most high-profile and controversial fugitive cases involving Mexico in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2004 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Twelve-year-old Steven Morales was fatally shot while playing baseball with friends. Tiffany Rios, 19, was gunned down as she sat in a car near an East Los Angeles apartment complex. Sheriff's Deputy David March was on routine patrol when he was shot at close range. In all three cases, the suspected killers fled to Mexico, prosecutors said. But because Mexico doesn't extradite suspects facing either the death penalty or life in prison without parole, U.S. authorities say their hands are tied.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2003 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
Officials from throughout California called Monday for a new treaty with Mexico, saying it is needed to secure the return of 360 fugitives wanted for murder and other crimes in the state. From liberals such as U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein to conservatives such as Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley, they said a new agreement is needed to halt the flight of accused criminals to a legal haven across the border.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|